The sat suite of Assessments professional development module 1 Key Features



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The SAT Suite of Assessments

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Module

1

Key Features

Professional Development Modules for the SAT Suite of Assessments

Module 1 Key Features

Module 2 Words in Context and Command of Evidence

Module 3 Expression of Ideas and Standard English Conventions

Module 4 Math that Matters Most

          • Heart of Algebra
          • Problem Solving and Data Analysis
          • Module 5 Math that Matters Most

          • Passport to Advanced Math
          • Additional Topics in Math
          • Module 6 The SAT Suite of Assessments: Using Scores and Reporting to Inform Instruction

            Module 7 Connecting History/Social Studies Instruction with the SAT Suite of Assessments

            Module 8 Connecting Science Instruction with the SAT Suite of Assessments

            Module 9 The SAT Essay

What is the Purpose of Module 1?

CHAPTER

1

  • Describe the structure and content of the SAT Suite of Assessments
  • Introduce scores and reports
  • Provide information to share with students about practice and preparation

What Do Students Need to Know for Post-High School Success?

The College Board has identified a critical set of knowledge, skills, and understandings that predict student success in college and workforce training programs:

  • Comprehend challenging literary and informational texts
  • Revise and edit extended texts
  • Show command of math, especially algebra and data analysis
  • Use evidence in reading and writing
  • Analyze data
  • Use and understand words in context

The SAT Suite of Assessments: Content and Structure

CHAPTER

2

What Is the Format of the SAT Suite of Assessments?

  • Evidence-Based Reading and Writing Section
  • Reading Test
  • Writing and Language Test
  • Math Section
  • Math Test: Calculator portion
  • Math Test: No-calculator portion
  • SAT only: Optional SAT Essay

Test Length and Timing


Reading Test

Writing and

Language Test

Math Test

Essay

 

 

 

 

Calculator

No Calculator

 

 

Total

Length

Total

Questions

Time Allotted

(in minutes)

Total

Questions

Time

Allotted

(in minutes)

Total Questions

Time Allotted

(in minutes)

Total Questions

Time Allotted

(in minutes)

Total Questions

Time Allotted

(in minutes)

SAT

3 hours

(+50 minutes, optional Essay)



52

65

44

35

38

55

20

25

1

50

PSAT/NMST and PSAT 10

2 hours,

45 minutes



47

60

44

35

31

45

17

25

N/A

N/A

PSAT 8/9

2 hours,

25 minutes



42

55

40

30

25

40

13

20

N/A

N/A

Key Features of the SAT Suite of Assessments

  • Words in Context
  • Command of Evidence
  • Essay Analyzing a Source
  • Math That Matters Most
  • Problems Grounded in Real-World Contexts
  • Analysis in Science and Analysis in History/Social Studies
  • U.S. Founding Documents and the Great Global Conversation
  • No Penalty for Guessing

Which Key Feature will have the most impact on students?

The SAT Suite of Assessments: Content and Sample Questions

CHAPTER

3

Evidence-Based Reading and Writing Overview

  • Evidence-Based Reading and Writing Section comprises the Reading Test and the Writing and Language Test.
  • Text complexity:
    • SAT: range from 9th grade through first year post-high school
    • PSAT/NMSQT and PSAT 10: range from 9th to 10th grade
    • PSAT 8/9: range from 6th to 10th grade
  • Emphasizes source analysis and use of evidence
  • Incorporates data and informational graphics
  • Focuses on words in context and on word choice for rhetorical effect
  • Includes texts in literature, science and social studies

Reading Test Overview

  • The overall aim of the Reading Test is to determine whether students can demonstrate college and career readiness proficiency in comprehending a broad range of high-quality, appropriately challenging literary and informational texts in the content areas of U.S. and world literature, history/social studies, and science.
  • The test comprises a series of passages and associated multiple-choice questions. Some question sets will refer to paired passages, others will refer to only one passage.
  • Students must refer to the specific language in the passages and use careful reasoning to draw supportable inferences.

Reading Test Sample Question – Passage (abbreviated)

1 Today, I am an inquisitor. An hyperbole would not be

fictional and would not overstate the solemnness that I

feel right now. My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is

complete; it is total. And I am not going to sit here and be

5 an idle spectator to the diminution, the subversion, the

destruction, of the Constitution.

“Who can so properly be the inquisitors for the nation

as the representatives of the nation themselves?” “The

subjects of its jurisdiction are those offenses which

10 proceed from the misconduct of public men.”

Reading Test Sample Question


The main rhetorical effect of the series of three phrases in lines 5–6 (“the diminution, the subversion, the destruction”) is to

A) convey with increasing intensity the seriousness of the threat Jordan sees to the Constitution.

B) clarify that Jordan believes the Constitution was first weakened, then sabotaged, then broken.

C) indicate that Jordan thinks the Constitution is prone to failure in three distinct ways.



D) propose a three-part agenda for rescuing the Constitution from the current crisis.

Content: Rhetoric / Analyzing word choice

Objective: Students must determine the main rhetorical effect of the speaker’s choice of words.

Reading Test Sample Question Explanation

A) convey with increasing intensity the seriousness of the threat Jordan sees to the Constitution. Choice A is the best answer because the quoted phrases — building from “diminution” to “subversion” to “destruction” — suggest the increasing seriousness of the threat Jordan sees to the Constitution.

Writing and Language Test Overview

  • Assesses college and career readiness proficiency in revising and editing a range of texts.
  • Does not require students to provide written responses -- multiple-choice questions only.
  • Attends to a core set of standard English language conventions and to effective written expression.
  • Some passages and/or questions will be accompanied by representations of data — tables, charts, graphs, etc.
  • All passages will be written specifically for the test.
  • The most common question format will require students to choose the best of three alternatives to an indicated part of the passage (often an underlined portion) or to determine that the version presented in the passage is the best option.

Writing and Language Test Sample Question

A 1954 documentary about renowned watercolor painter Dong Kingman shows the artist sitting on a stool on Mott Street in New York City’s Chinatown. A crowd of admiring spectators watches as Kingman squeezes dollops of paint from several tubes into a tin watercolor [2] box, from just a few primary colors, Kingman creates dozens of beautiful hues as he layers the translucent paint onto the paper on his easel. Each stroke of the brush and dab of the sponge transforms thinly sketched outlines into buildings, shop signs, and streetlamps. The street scene Kingman begins composing in this short film is very much in keeping with the urban landscapes for which he is best known.

2.

A) NO CHANGE

B) box. From just a few primary colors,

C) box from just a few primary colors,

D) box, from just a few primary colors

Content: Standard English Conventions/Conventions of Punctuation

Objective: Students must create two grammatically complete and standard sentences.

Writing and Language Test Sample Question Explanation

B) box. From just a few primary colors,

Choice B is the best answer because it provides punctuation that creates two grammatically complete and standard sentences.

Optional Essay Overview

  • Students who opt to take the SAT Essay are required to make purposeful, substantive use of textual evidence in a way that can be objectively evaluated.
  • The essay is not designed to elicit students’ subjective opinions.
  • The prompt will remain consistent for all administrations of the SAT; only the writing passages will change.
  • Students will receive three scores of 2-8 in Reading, Writing, and Analysis.

Optional Essay Prompt


As you read the passage below, consider how [the author] uses
  • evidence, such as facts or examples, to support claims.
  • reasoning to develop ideas and to connect claims and evidence.
  • stylistic or persuasive elements, such as word choice or appeals to emotion, to add power to the ideas expressed.

Source Text

Write an essay in which you explain how [the author] builds an argument to persuade [his/her] audience that [author’s claim]. In your essay, analyze how [the author] uses one or more of the features listed above (or features of your own choice) to strengthen the logic and persuasiveness of [his/her] argument. Be sure that your analysis focuses on the most relevant aspects of the passage. Your essay should not explain whether you agree with [the author’s] claims, but rather explain how [he/she] builds an argument to persuade [his/her] audience.


Math Test Overview

  • Focus on content that matters most for college and career readiness:
  • Assesses fluency with, understanding of, and ability to apply mathematical concepts
  • Algebra and linear equations
  • Problem solving and data analysis
  • Advanced mathematical practices
  • Certain key elements are woven throughout the Math Test:
  • Emphasis on mathematical application and reasoning
  • Problems from a range of disciplines addressing real-world problems drawn from science, social studies, and careers
  • Inclusion of both calculator and no-calculator portions as well as attention to the use of a calculator as a tool
  • Includes both multiple choice questions and student-produced response questions

Math Test Sample Question (No Calculator portion)

What is one possible solution to the equation

This example, from the no-calculator portion of the test, requires students to look at the structure of the expression and find a way to rewrite it, again showing the link between fluency and mathematical practices. The student must transform the expression without a calculator, for example by multiplying both sides of the equation by a common denominator as a first step to find the solution.

*This is an example of a “Student-Produced Response” or grid-in question. Students will not be given answer choices. Instead, they fill in the grid with their answers. Approximately 20% of the math test contains student-produced response questions.

Content: Passport to Advanced Math

Math Test Sample Question - Solution (No Calculator portion)

In this problem, multiplying both sides of the equation by the common denominator

(x + 1)(x − 1) yields 24(x − 1) − 12(x + 1) = (x + 1)(x − 1). Multiplication and simplification then yields

12x − 36 = x2 − 1, or

x2 − 12x + 35 = 0.

Factoring the quadratic gives (x − 5)(x − 7) = 0, so the solutions occur at x = 5 and x = 7, both of which should be checked in the original equation to ensure that they are not extraneous. In this case, both values are solutions.

Scores and Reporting

CHAPTER

4


For more information about SAT Suite scores and reports:

Professional Development Module 6 – Using Scores and Reporting to Inform Instruction



SAT Suite of Assessments: Using Scores and Reporting to Inform Instruction

Score Reporting on the SAT Suite of Assessments


Score ranges on this table are for SAT only.

Scores and Score Ranges Across the SAT Suite of Assessments

How Does the SAT Suite Relate to Instruction in Science and History/ Social Studies Courses?

  • Cross-test scores include scores for Analysis in Science and Analysis in History/Social Studies.
  • Some passages used for analysis on the Reading Test and the Writing and Language Test have foundations in science and history/social studies.
  • One passage used on the Reading Test will be a U.S. founding document or from the great global conversation.
  • Tables, graphs, and data accompanying some passages relate to topics science and/or history/social studies.
  • Some math questions will have science or social science contexts.

Standard Reporting for the SAT Suite


Standard Reports 

Report Content

Scores by Institution Report

Provides aggregate scores for your school as well as scores for all students in your school for each assessment, test administration or cohort, and grade.

Benchmarks by Institution Report (by school/district and by demographic groups

Lists overall district/school benchmark performance.

Scores by Demographics Report

Provides aggregate scores for demographic groups of students in your school for each assessment, administration or cohort, and grade

Question Analysis Report

Provides information about correct and incorrect answers selected by individual students.

Compares students’ performance on a given question to the performance of all students in the .state or nation.

Instructional Planning Report

Compares the subscore performance among user-created groups

Mapped to state standards and linked to the actual assessment questions.

K–12 Assessment Reporting Tool

  • Accesses a wide array of standard reports.
  • Provides benchmarks and consistent feedback to help teachers encourage and accelerate students over time.
  • Allows educators to drill down to the student level.
  • Can be configured to create personalized reports
    • Filter by student-provided information
    • Create reporting groups based on user criteria

How To Help Students Prepare for the SAT

CHAPTER

5

Practice with Khan Academy®

  • The College Board and Khan Academy have partnered to provide online SAT practice resources entirely free of charge.
  • Features include:
  • Thousands of practice problems
  • Personalized tutorials on test content
  • Official SAT practice questions and full-length tests
  • Comprehensive reporting for students
  • Access anytime, anywhere — for free
  • The College Board is working with educators, community groups, college access organizations, and parents to provide the necessary resources to propel students to college success.
  • Practice programs are individually targeted to address each student’s greatest areas of need (based on diagnostic assessment on khanacademy.org).
  • www.satpractice.org

So What? / Now What? Making Information Work for You and Your Students

  • Determine students’ current status
  • Set attainable goals with intermediate targets
  • Guide students to targeted practice
  • Measure progress
  • Meet the benchmark

Top 10 Things to Tell Students About the SAT

  • Register/sign up for Khan Academy.
  • Use evidence to support your arguments.
  • Build your reading stamina.
  • Always analyze the informational graphics.
  • Get excited about the U.S. Founding Documents.
  • Practice editing.
  • Put away the calculator (some of the time).
  • Check your answers.
  • Answer every question on the test.
  • Take the SAT!

Self Assessment/Reflection

  • What are you doing/can you do in your classroom to help students understand what they’ll see on the SAT?
  • Which Key Feature is most aligned with your current instruction?
  • Which Key Feature is most challenging to incorporate into your lesson planning?
  • What do you need to know to begin using Khan Academy with your students?
  • What is the first/best point of entry for including Khan Academy in your curriculum map/lesson plans?
  • How can you help students keep track of their own progress toward meeting the college and career ready benchmark?

Redesigned SAT Teacher Implementation Guide

CHAPTER

6


See the whole guide at collegereadiness.collegeboard.org

What’s in the Redesigned SAT Teacher Implementation Guide?

  • Information and strategies for teachers in all subject areas
  • Overview of SAT content and structure
  • Test highlights
  • General Instructional Strategies
  • Sample test questions and annotations
  • Skill-Building Strategies for the classroom
  • Keys to the SAT (information pertaining to the SAT structure and format)
  • Rubrics and sample essays
  • Scores and reporting
  • Advice to share with students

Questions or comments about this presentation or the SAT Suite of Assessments?

Email: SATinstructionalsupport@collegeboard.org

Exit Survey

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/PD_Module_1



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