The purpose of this course is for students to analyze fiction and non-fiction texts in greater depth and produce complex writing



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10th Grade Curriculum Overview Manual Arts High School SMART SLC 2014-2015b
Course Description: The purpose of this course is for students to analyze fiction and non-fiction texts in greater depth and produce complex writing. Students will apply the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier grades with more refinement, depth and sophistication with grade-level appropriate material. The California Reading/Language Arts Framework states that students in the tenth grade are expected to read 1-1.5 million words annually on their own, including a good representation of classic and contemporary literature, magazines, newspapers, and online articles. Students will apply and refine their command of the writing process and writing conventions to produce argumentative, expository, and descriptive texts of at least 1,500 words each.
FALL

Focus Common Core State Standards

Demonstration of Mastery
Learning Objectives: Skills & Concepts

Essential Questions & SWBAT



Resources

Textbooks & Supplements



Assessments

Formative & Summative



Timeline

W.9-10.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.



“A life without cause is a life without effect” -Barbarella
EQ:

How can you solve problems in your community?

What are the causes of world hunger? What are the effects of world hunger?

How can you decrease the negative causes or effects of world hunger?


SWBAT:

Write a clear claim.

Write a logically organized essay for an intended audience.

Use varied and vetted evidence to support his/her claim.

Include a counterclaim and rebuttal in his/her writing.
Support Standards:

RI.9-10.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

RI/L.9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).


CAHSEE Argumentative Test Question

Cornell Notes

Brutus and Antony’s speeches in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar

TED Talk “Save the Oceans, Feed the World” Savitz

Resear

Defunct LAUSD SPA Tests



From: Perspectives in Multicultural Literature (Multicultural) and in Prentice Hall Literature; Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes; Platinum Level (Timeless)

“If Decency Doesn’t, Law Should Make Us Samaritans” Allred and Bloom

“Good Samaritans U.S.A. Are Afraid to Act” Sjoerdsma

“The Parable of the Good Samaritan” King James Bible

“A State Championship Versus Runner’s Conscience” Hoyle

“Dear Folks” Bagby




FA:

Exit Slips

Quick Writes

Pair Shares

Round Robins

Writing Graphic Organizers

Timed CAHSEE Style Essays
SA:

Writing Graphic Organizers

Timed CAHSEE Style Essays


September-November

RI/L.9-10.2 Determine a theme/central idea of a text and analyze (in detail) its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges (is developed) and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text

EQ:

What is the purpose of this text?

How does the author convey his purpose to his audience?

What are cultural differences/similarities?


SWBAT:

RI/L.9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).



Multicultural Folk Tales and Poetry found in various picture book and folk tale anthologies

FA:

Exit Slips

Quick Writes

Pair Shares

Round Robins

Reading Graphic Organizers

Annotation Notes

Active Reading Question Notes

Socratic Circles

CAHSEE Style Questions


SA:

Reading Graphic Organizers

Socratic Circles

CAHSEE Style Assessments



November-December

SPRING


Focus Common Core State Standard

Demonstration of Mastery

Learning Objectives: Skills & Concepts

Essential Question & SWBAT


Resources

Textbooks & Supplements



Assessments


Timeline

W.9-10.2 Write informative/ explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

b. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.

e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).


“If there is no struggle, there is no progress . . .” Frederick Douglass
EQ:

How do you read and write an informative/expository text?

What are the steps you need to take to implement a successful expository presentation/text?

SMART Symposium: What are the impacts of human development on the planet and its inhabitants?


SWBAT:

Write an expository text that answers the prompt.

Use multiple rhetorical techniques to reach his/her intended audience.


Cornell Notes

CAHSEE Questions


From: Multicultural

“Superman and Me” Sherman Alexie

“Theme for English B”
Warriner’s English Grammar and Composition
From: Timeless

Writing Workshops

Reading Informational Materials

“Lightning and Thunder”

“There Will Come Soft Rains” Ray Bradbury


FA:

Exit Slips

Quick Writes

Pair Shares

Round Robins

(& Other Kagan Strategies)

Writing Graphic Organizers

Timed CAHSEE Style Essays


SA:

Writing Graphic Organizers

Timed CAHSEE Style Essays


January-March

RI/L.9-10.6 Determine an author’s point of view/purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view/purpose.

EQ:

What is the purpose of this text?

How does the author convey his purpose to his audience?
SWBAT:

Identify (the central idea/the theme/) the purpose of the text.

Identify how the author develops his/her (central idea/theme/) purpose through the use of rhetoric in the text.


From: Multicultural

Coming of Age texts

Poetry
From: Timeless

Multicultural Poetry

Short Stories
Lord of the Flies William Golding


FA:

Exit Slips

Quick Writes

Pair Shares

Round Robins

(& Other Kagan Strategies)

Reading Graphic Organizers

Socratic Circles


SA: Reading Graphic Organizer

Socratic Circles



March-April

SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.

c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.


EQ:

What type of language influences the audience in a positive manner?

What are credible arguments for or against a position?

What kinds of texts are useful to create credible arguments?

What kinds of questions can be asked to further a position?

What kinds of questions can be asked to reveal the fallacies of a conflicting position?

SWBAT:

Use Costa’s Levels of Questions to further discussions on specific topics/texts.



Come to discussions prepared to speak politely on the topics.

Supporting Standards:

RI.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.



Table Top Topics

AVID Topics



FA:
Quick Writes

Pair Shares

Rally Robins

(& Other Kagan Strategies)

Socratic Circles

Philosophical Chairs

SA:

Pair Shares



Socratic Circles

April- May
(Also

Included in

Most Spring

Semester


Instruction)

OPTIONAL: FALL 2015



Focus Common Core State Standards

Demonstration of Mastery
Learning Objectives: Skills & Concepts

Essential Questions & SWBAT



Resources

Textbooks & Supplements



Assessments

Formative & Summative



Timeline

W.9-10.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.



“A life without cause is a life without effect” -Barbarella
EQ:

How can you solve problems in your community?

What are the causes of world hunger? What are the effects of world hunger?

How can you decrease the negative causes or effects of world hunger?


SWBAT:

Write a clear claim.

Write a logically organized essay for an intended audience.

Use varied and vetted evidence to support his/her claim.

Include a counterclaim and rebuttal in his/her writing.
Support Standards:

RI.9-10.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

RI/L.9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).


From: Multicultural

“Declaration of the Rights of Women” Susan B. Anthony

“Ain’t I A Woman?” Sojourner Truth

To Kill A Mockingbird Harper Lee

“I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” Martin Luther King Jr.

“What the future Holds for Farm Workers and Hispanics” Cesar Chavez

“Remarks to the Convocation of the Church of Christ in God” William J. Clinton




FA:

Exit Slips

Quick Writes

Pair Shares

Round Robins

(& Other Kagan Strategies)

Writing Graphic Organizers

Timed CAHSEE Style Essays


SA:

Writing Graphic Organizers



Timed CAHSEE Style Essays

September-November


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