The following prompts each go into major characters or themes of the stories. For you essay, you’ll pick one. You will need to use evidence and quotes from the texts to support your ideas



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The third quarter essay for Survey of Literature will ask students to compare and contrast big ideas from the last two works we have read: 12 Angry Men and To Kill a Mockingbird. The following prompts each go into major characters or themes of the stories. For you essay, you’ll pick one. You will need to use evidence and quotes from the texts to support your ideas. This wraps up all of the work we have done so far this year in relation to essay writing and literary analysis.

1. -Compare and contrast Tom Robinson from To Kill a Mockingbird and the boy from 12 Angry Men. What do we know about each one? How does prejudice factor into their trials? In your analysis of these two characters find and elaborate on meaningful similarities and differences, not just surface level stuff.


2. -How does the theme of justice (or prejudice) develop in TKAM and 12 Angry Men? Which representation/development do you think is more realistic/accurate? Why? What do these two works of literature demonstrate to readers about justice and prejudice? Also, how does bias play a role in the in each author’s development of these ideas? Compare and contrast the two works in relation to these ideas.

3. Compare and contrast Juror 3 from 12 Angry Men to Bob Ewell from To Kill a Mockingbird. In your analysis of these two characters find and elaborate on meaningful similarities and differences, not just surface level stuff.

4. Compare and contrast Atticus Finch from To Kill a Mockingbird to Juror 8 from 12 Angry Men. What is similar about them? Point out a couple of key similarities and use evidence and examples to demonstrate them. Also, point out a couple of key differences and explain why they are important for the stories in which each character functions.

12 Angry Men Quotes:

Judge:
It now becomes your duty to separate the facts from the fancy. One man is dead. The life of another is at stake. I urge you to deliberate honestly and thoughtfully. If there is a reasonable doubt – then you must bring me a verdict of “not guilty.” If, however, there is no reasonable doubt – then you must, in good conscience, find the accused guilty.” (Act 1, page 6)

When voting in the very beginning: Seven or eight hands go up immediately. Several others go up more slowly. Everyone looks around the table as the foreman rises and begins to count hands. The 9th juror’s hand goes up now, and all hands are raises except the 8th juror’s…. (Act 1, narrative/stage directions)

8th juror (defending his decision to vote “not guilty” in the beginning): there were eleven votes for “guilty.” It’s not easy for me to raise my hand and send a boy off to die without talking about it first.

10th juror: I don’t mind telling you this, mister. We don’t owe him a thing. He got a fair trial, didn’t he? What d’you think the trial cost? He’s lucky he got it. Know what I mean? [He rises and looks around at the others.] Look, we’re all grown-ups here. We heard the facts, didn’t we? Now you’re not going to tell us that we’re supposed to believe that kid, knowing what he is. Listen, I’ve lived among ‘em all my life. You can’t believe a word they say. I mean, they’re born liars. (Act 1 – page 13)

3rd juror (talking about his son): Yeah, well I’ve got one. He’s twenty. We did everything for that boy, and what happened? When he was nine he ran away from a fight. I saw him. I was so ashamed I almost threw up. So I told him right out. “I’m gonna make a man outa you or I’m gonna bust you in half trying.” Well, I made a man outa him all right. When he was sixteen we had a battle. He hit me in the face. He’s big y’know. I haven’t seen him in two years. Rotten kid. You work your heart out… [He breaks off. He has said more than he intended. He is embarrassed.] All right. Let’s get on with it.

10th juror [interrupting]: Brother, you can say that again. The kids who crawl outa those places are real trash. I don’t want any part of them, I’m telling you.

Mockingbird quotes:

Chapter 10: (page 90) – “I’d rather you shoot at tin cans in the backyard, but I know you’ll go after birds. Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit em’, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.”

Page 219 (bottom): I know, and lots of ‘em probably deserve it, too (and rest of paragraph into page 220- about reasonable doubt)

Page 220 (middle): “So far nothing in our life has interfered with your reasoning process. Those are twelve reasonable men in everyday life, Tom’s jury, but you saw something come between them and reason. You saw….. (rest of paragraph – bias)

Page 225 (top): She took off her glasses and stared at me. “I’ll tell you why,” she said. “Because – he – is – trash, that’s why you can’t play with him. I’ll not have you around him, picking up his habits and learning Lord-knows- what. (bias)

Page 227: bottom (end of ch.23) “That’s what I thought, too,” he said at last, “when I was your age. If there’s just one kind of folks, why can’t they get along with each other? If they’re all alike, why do they go out of their way to despise each other? Scout, I think I’m beginning to understand something. I think I’m beginning to understand why Boo Radley’s stayed shut up in the house all this time… it’s because he wants to stay inside.”

230 – 234: review these section/read aloud- woman’s missionary/church meeting – hypocrisy – powerful section –lots of potential for quotes for essay

Modern lit unit:

You are what you eat

Blood Child – Octavia Butler

Excerpts from Part Time Indian – Sherman Alexie

Poetry –



Excerpts from Perks of Being a Wallflower

David Sedaris


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