The Crucible 9-16 through Mr. Stanberry



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The Crucible

    • 9-16 through
  • Mr. Stanberry
  • English III

Journal Entry : September 8, 2014

  • Copy the Academic Vocabulary terms and definitions.
  • Analysis – the study of a literary work, separating it into parts in order to determine its nature.
  • Argument – a statement or the main point of a piece.
  • Author’s purpose – the reason (s) an author has for writing a piece; to inform, persuade, or entertain.
  • Citation – the acknowledgement of ideas found in outside sources
  • Claim – a statement or assertion presented as fact.

Daily Classwork : 9-8-14

  • Journal Entry / Definitions
  • Read : Life in the New World (Pg. 14)
  • Notes: Presentation Colonization
  • Picture Day
  • Objectives :
  • - Establish formal literary vocabulary.
  • - Discuss the importance of religious beliefs of the early American Settlers.

Puritanism

  • In 1620, after years of separation, the Puritans migrated to the Massachusetts Bay colony.
  • The early settlers created churches that follow the traditional form of theology that was carried over into Plymouth.
  • The church consisted of deacons, preaching elders, and, though not right away, a communion restricted to full church members, or “saints”.
  • These Puritans called themselves “non-separating Congregationalists,” by which they meant that they had not repudiated the Church of England as a false church.

Puritanism / Continued

  • Puritans believed that all members of an immediate family had a specific role.
  • Daily responsibilities for families included: hunting/preparing food (men), making clothes (women) and furniture (men), teaching children how to read/worship (both), maintaining positive social order (all), and being responsible for the well being of one another.
  • The father served as the “head of the household.” Men had a specific skill set or trade that would keep the family financially stable.

Puritanism / Continued

  • The role of women was hindered to the concept of “traditional” female roles in society.
  • Women were not allowed to vote, and they had a very limited role in the community.
  • Most importantly, women (and children) were never allowed to question church doctrine.
  • Clergymen were highly regarded by the community due to their “direct line of contact” with God.

Puritan Communities

  • Community involvement was vital for Puritans.
  • The church served as a sort of checks and balances system for individual families, as well as the children of all families collectively.

Journal Entry : September 9, 2014

  • Copy the Academic Vocabulary terms and definitions.
  • Ethos – The appeal of a speakers own credibility.
  • Logos - The appeal of reason; often made through facts.
  • Pathos - The appeal to common human emotion.
  • Connotative meaning – an association for a word that is implied by the word’s ideas or qualities
  • Imagery - visually descriptive or figurative language
  • Repetition - The return of a word, phrase, stanza form, or effect in any form of literature
  • Allusion - A figure of speech making casual reference to a famous historical or literary figure or event.

Daily Classwork

  • Journal Entry / Discussion
  • Introduction Material / Jonathan Edwards (Pg. 88)
  • Read : Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God (Pg. 90)
  • Answer review questions
  • Today I Learned – Exit Slip
  • Objectives:
  • Relating literature to a historic period / Identifying imagery / Understanding connotation / Identifying allusion / Learn Aristotle’s Appeals (Ethos, Logos, and Pathos)

Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God

  • What is the purpose of the sermon?
  • According to Edwards, how can mankind save itself?
  • Identify some messages, images, or phrases that Edwards repeats frequently. What is the purpose of this repetition? What is the effect?
  • Give 5 examples of imagery from the sermon.
  • What biblical allusion is made in the sermon?
  • Edwards puts emphasis on the “pleasure of God.” How would you define the ‘pleasure of God’? What kind of picture of God does Edwards paint for his listeners when he discusses the ‘pleasure of God’?
  • What does Edwards assume his audience is afraid of? How does he utilize these fears to his advantage? What new fears does he cultivate?

Journal Entry : September 10, 2014

  • Describe how Jonathan Edwards created Aristotle’s Appeals in Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God.
  • Ethos / Logos / and Pathos
  • You can use your definitions for the journal entry.

Daily Classwork

  • Journal Entry / Discussion
  • Vocab Quiz
  • Read : Before the Read / Anne Bradstreet (Pg. 82)
  • Read : Upon the Burning of Our House (Pg. 84) and To My Dear and Loving Husband (Pg. 85)
  • Respond : Questions 1-5 (Pg. 86)
  • Objectives :
  • - Create an inference on the author’s beliefs / Understand culture through literature / Review parts of poetry

Journal Entry : September 11, 2014

  • On this a day of remembrance, discuss the feelings or emotions that you have in relation to “9/11.” (Four sentences)
  • Do you feel safe as a citizen of the U.S. ? Why/why not?

Daily Classwork

  • Journal Entry / Discussion
  • Review : Upon the Burning of Our House
  • Read : Background Information (Pg. 74)
  • Read : A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (Pg. 76)
  • Objectives :
  • Analyze the historical conflict between Native Americans and Europeans. / Acknowledge and identify the use of allusion.

Journal Entry : September 12, 2014

  • It’s Free Write Friday,
  • This is haiku poetry,
  • You can haiku too!

Daily Classwork

  • Journal Entry / Discussion
  • Read : The Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (Continued)
  • Read : (Independent Reading) The Life of Oloudah Equiano (Pg. 68)
  • Assignment : Handout / Written Response
  • Objectives:
  • - Responding personally, critically, and analytically to non-fiction texts / Compare and contrast like works of non-fiction. / Continue learning the form of non-fiction known as slave narratives.
  • Journal Entry / Summary
  • Complete Act I
  • Act I Review
  • Objectives:
  • CCS:
  • Daily Classwork

For today's bell work, select the character that you will use for the Character Analysis assignment.

  • For today's bell work, select the character that you will use for the Character Analysis assignment.
  • In your journal, write your selected character’ s name and a brief rationale about why you selected him/her.
  • Upon completion of this task, take the first 10 minutes of class to gather information (quotes, character description, etc.) for your chart. Please do so independently.
  • Journal Entry : 9-17-13
  • Journal Entry / Character Selection
  • Classroom Assignment
  • Character Maps
  • Objectives:
  • CCS:
  • Daily Classwork

The Crucible Vocabulary Pt. 1

  • The Crucible Vocabulary Pt. 1
  • Copy the terms and the definitions.
  • Dissembling- to disguise or conceal behind false appearance.
  • Conjure- to summon (devil/spirits) by magical or supernatural power.
  • Vindictive- disposed to seek revenge; revengeful
  • Propriety- the state of conforming to conventionally accepted standards of behavior or morals.
  • Diametrically- completely; directly
  • Use one of the terms above in a complete sentence.
  • Journal Entry : 9-18-13
  • Journal Entry
  • Act I Review : Take 2! : Literature Book Pg. 1045 Questions 1-8 & 1-2 Dialogue (20 minutes)
  • TPCASTT Poetry Analysis Introduction / Example
  • “Upon the Burning of our House” Pg. 84 (Literature Book)
  • “Half-Hanged Mary”
  • Questions / Discussion
  • Objectives:
  • CCS:
  • Daily Classwork

The Crucible Vocabulary Pt. 2

  • The Crucible Vocabulary Pt. 2
  • Copy the terms and definitions.
  • Defamation- the action of damaging the good reputation of someone : slander or libel
  • Malign- evil in disposition, nature, or intent
  • Fiend- an evil spirit or demon
  • Iniquity- immoral or grossly unfair behavior
  • Malevolence- having or showing a wish to do evil to others
  • Use one of the words above in a complete sentence.
  • Journal Entry : 9-19-13
  • Journal Entry
  • Begin Act II
  • Objectives:
  • CCS:
  • Daily Classwork

It's yet again time for Free Write Friday!

  • It's yet again time for Free Write Friday!
  • If you prefer a topic, make your prediction for the Battle of the Big Cats! Write about your excitement for tonight's game.
  • Once you have finished, review the vocabulary terms from Wednesday and Thursday. It’s vocab quiz time!!
  • Journal Entry : 9-20-13
  • Journal Entry
  • Finish Act II
  • Objectives:
  • CCS:
  • Daily Classwork

22nd Hour Questions

  • Briefly discuss the lie told by John Proctor to his wife Elizabeth.
  • Explain what was meant in the narration “she has suddenly lost all faith in him”
  • Does Elizabeth have just reasoning for her frustration?
  • Discuss the shift of the conversation. How does John Proctor regain the upper hand?
  • Describe Mary Warren’s character as she arrives home.
  • What “gift” does she bring? Who does she give it to?
  • The number of accused went from ____ to ____.
  • What is Goody Proctor accused of? (Don’t write witchcraft Kody)
  • What was Sarah Good accused for?
  • What was the justification of the court?
    • 1.
    • 2.
    • 3.
    • 4.
  • Journal Entry: 9-23-13
    • We finished Act II of The Crucible on Friday. Complete the chart below using the chain of events from Act II. Use FOUR key events in chronological order.
  • Journal Entry / Chain of Events
  • Act I & II Review
  • Begin Act III
  • Objectives:
  • CCS:
  • Daily Classwork

The Crucible Vocab. Pt. 3

  • The Crucible Vocab. Pt. 3
  • Copy the terms and definitions.
  • Inert – lacking the ability or strength to move.
  • Anarchy –  A state of disorder due to absence or lack of recognition to authority.
  • Prodigious – unnatural or abnormal.
  • Calumny – the making of false and defamatory statements in order to damage someone's reputation
  • Faction – a small, organized, dissenting group within a larger one
  • Use one of the terms above in a complete sentence.
  • Journal Entry : 9-24-13

The Crucible Vocab. Pt. 4

  • The Crucible Vocab. Pt. 4
  • Copy the terms and definitions.
  • Pallor – an unhealthy pale appearance
  • Base – without moral principles
  • Condemnation –the expression of very strong disapproval
  • Daft – silly; foolish
  • Anonymity- the condition of being anonymous
  • Use one of the terms above in a complete sentence.
  • Journal Entry : 9-25-13

Journal Entry 9/26/13

  • Write a brief summary of yesterday’s reading.

Journal Entry : 9/27/13

  • You know what to do; for it is Friday…
  • If you prefer a topic, briefly discuss what you are looking forward to doing this weekend.
  • Or, you could write about your favorite character in The Crucible.

Archetypal Tragic Hero

  • Noble Stature: since tragedy involves the "fall" of a tragic hero, one theory is that one must have a lofty position to fall from, or else there is no tragedy (just pathos). Another explanation of this characteristic is that tragedies involving people of stature affect the lives of others.
  • Tragic Flaw (Hamartia): the tragic hero must "fall" due to some flaw in his own personality. The most common tragic flaw is hubris (excessive pride). One who tries to attain too much possesses hubris.
  • Free Choice: while there is often a discussion of the role of fate in the downfall of a tragic hero, there must be an element of choice in order for there to be a true tragedy. The tragic hero falls because he chooses one course of action over another.
  • The Punishment Exceeds the Crime: the audience must not be left feeling that the tragic hero got what he deserved. Part of what makes the action "tragic" is to witness the injustice of what has occurred to the tragic hero.
  • Hero has Increased Awareness: it is crucial that the tragic hero come to some sort of an understanding of what went wrong or of what was really going on before he comes to his end.
  • Produces Catharsis in Audience: catharsis is a feeling of "emotional purgation" that an audience feels after witnessing the plight of a tragic hero: we feel emotionally drained, but exultant.

Journal Entry: 9/30/13

  • Tell me about your project.
  • Which project did you choose?
  • How is your project coming along?
  • Tell me a difference between the movie and the book version.

Journal Entry : 9/30/13

  • Grammar Review / Subject Verb Agreement
  • 1. Everyone (has/have) done his or her homework.
  • 2. Each of the students (is/are) responsible for doing his or her work.
  • 3. Either my father or my brothers (is/are) going to sell the car.
  • 4. Neither my sisters nor my mother (is/are) going to sell the house.
  • 5. The samples on the tray in the lab (need/needs) testing.
  • 6. Mary and John usually (plays/play) together.
  • 7. Both of the dogs (has/have) collars.
  • 8. Neither the dogs nor the cat (is/are) very hungry.
  • 9. Either the girls or the boy (walk/walks) in the evening.
  • 10. Either the boy or the girls (walk/walks) in the evening.

Answers

  • 1. Everyone has done his or her homework.
  • 2. Each of the students is responsible for doing his or her work.
  • 3. Either my father or my brothers are going to sell the car.
  • 4. Neither my sisters nor my mother is going to sell the house.
  • 5. The samples on the tray in the lab need testing.
  • 6. Mary and John usually play together.
  • 7. Both of the dogs have collars.
  • 8. Neither the dogs nor the cat is very hungry.
  • 9. Either the girls or the boy walks in the evening.
  • 10. Either the boy or the girls walk in the evening.

Journal Entry: 10-1-13

  • Fix the run-on sentences.
  • 1. The woman’s skills are perfect for the new position we intend to promote her.
  • 2. The team lost seven games in a row, consequently, the coach was fired.
  • 3. Here is the chief administrator, he will solve our problems.
  • 4. He phoned his fiancée repeatedly but she refused to return his calls.
  • 5. I have good ideas I can’t put them into a sentence.

Answers

  • The woman’s skills are perfect for the new position, so we intend to promote her.
  • The team lost seven games in a row; consequently, the coach was fired.
  • Here is the chief administrator; he will solve our problems.
  • He phoned his fiancée repeatedly, but she refused to return his calls.
  • I have good ideas, yet I can’t put them into a sentence.

Journal Entry: 10-2-13

  • Provide an example of the following types of figurative language:
  • 1- simile
  • 2- metaphor
  • 3- hyperbole
  • 4- personification
  • 5- allusion

Journal Entry: 10-4-13

  • It is Friday; enjoy the free-write!
  • If you would like a topic, tell me you concerns with essay writing.
  • Or, tell me about the process of creating your project.
  • Write for the first five minutes of class.


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