The classroom is a small resource room setting. The room is a converted copy room and therefore lacking in space. It is located next to the school gymnasium and can get very noisy



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Context

The classroom is a small resource room setting. The room is a converted copy room and therefore lacking in space. It is located next to the school gymnasium and can get very noisy. There is a table in the middle which seats six. The maximum capacity for a class is five students. There are two computers available. There is no Smartboard or wall fastened whiteboard. The whiteboard used is on a stand, and mini whiteboards are used for more intensive instructional purposes. Despite a lack of space, the room is adorned from floor to ceiling with warm, welcoming, and instructive decorations. Reference materials on the wall include foundational skills for math, science, social studies, and ELA for grades 1-5. The bulletin board displays student work from throughout the year. The teacher's desk is situated in a corner and rarely used. There is also an expansive classroom library with books for every reading level. There is significant traffic from other teachers on a daily basis. The energy of the room is fun, engaging, welcoming, instructive, and disciplined.

There are 14 students altogether and five groups. One group consists of two, third grade boys, both with learning disabilities. Another group consists of two, fourth grade girls, one with a learning disability and one with a speech and language classification. Another group consists of two fourth graders, a boy and a girl. The boy is classified ADHD and has a seizure disorder, the girl is classified LD. Another group consists of five, fifth graders. There are three girls and two boys in this group. Two have learning disabilities, two are classified ADHD, and one is classified speech and language. The last group consists of two boys and one girl, all in fifth grade. One has a learning disability, one is classified ADHD, and the other is classified ADHD and ODD. Ten of the students are Caucasian, one is Asian, two are Hispanic, and one is Multiracial. Twelve of the students attend resource four times a week for 45 minute periods, one attends three times a week for a 45 minute period, and one attends two times a week for a 45 minute period.

Many times the students come to the resource room with curriculum work from their classroom. When this is the case, the resource room teacher and student teacher work to integrate IEP goals into the curriculum work. When the students don't come down with specific work, IEP goals are worked on more intensively as well as each student's area of struggle. Reading comprehension, writing skills, and word problems are worked on often as they seem to be the most universal areas of struggle. Unit plans are not implemented due to the varied needs of the students attending resource room. However, writing/essay writing activities extend over a period of time and are implemented when students come to resource room without any curriculum work.



Student Profile

The student being assessed in this sample is an eight year old, Caucasian male classified as having a Learning Disability. He attends a regular education classroom for most of the day and receives reading services as well as resource room services. He attends resource room four days a week for 45 minute periods. There are two other students in his resource room group. The student is social and outgoing and works well with his peers. He enjoys competitive activities, and often volunteers ideas, especially when confident about a topic. He does well in a small group setting but struggles to stay on task when concepts become challenging. Math is an area of strength, but he struggles significantly with organized writing, spelling, and generating ideas. For this reason, a unit on narrative essay writing was prepared.



CCSS Writing Unit ELA Grade 3

Writing




Unit: Narrative Essay Writing



Unit Objectives:

  • Write a quality narrative essay as assessed by CCSS and IEP goals.


Writing Objectives:

  • Write a cohesive, narrative essay with an appropriate introduction, middle, and end.

  • Use supporting details to enhance writing.

  • Practice planning, revising, editing, and rewriting to strengthen writing.


Common Core Writing Standards:

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.1a Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.1b Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.1d Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.1d Provide a concluding statement or section.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.3b Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations,

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.3d Provide a sense of closure.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.1a Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.4 With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.8 Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.3c Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.3a Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.2a Capitalize appropriate words in titles.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.3 Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.


Build Understanding


Introduce:

  • Students will spend two lessons working on descriptive writing skills and understanding and writing quality conclusions.


Phase 1 Brainstorming

(1-2 days)



Four-Square Brainstorming:

Students will fill out their four-square graphic organizers to brainstorm topics to be used in their essay.



Structure:

Guidance:

Teacher will make suggestions to help students better organize their writing plan. Suggestions will be made concerning:



  • Structure

  • Details

  • Characters

  • Transition

Phase 2

Writing

(4-5 days)



Writing


  • Students will work independently on the first drafts of their essay, using their four-square organizers for guidance.

  • Teacher will read each paragraph as it's finished and make suggestions.




Teacher Suggestions


  • "How can you transition this paragraph into your next one?"

  • "What adjectives can you add to make the paragraph more interesting?

  • "What transition words can you add to make the writing flow better?"




Phase 3

Editing & Revising

(1 day)

Independent Revising

Students will re-read their essays, making a minimum of ten corrections. When ten corrections have been made, they will sit with the teacher for final editing.



Final Editing

Students will sit one-on-one with the teacher while she finalizes corrections and explains each correction made.




Phase 4

Re-Writing

(2-3 days)


Re-Write

Students will spend the next few days rewriting their essay neatly and accurately. Rewriting will be done independently.




Phase 5

Illustration & Whole Class Share

(1 day)

Illustration

Students will illustrate their stories to later be displayed in the classroom.


Oral Reading: Expression

Students will orally read their completed stories to the class to practice oral fluency and presentation skills.


Discussion: Listening

Discuss cooperatively as class what the elements of the presented story were and encourage positive and supportive commentary.





Differentiation,

Modifications or Accommodations


Students with Disabilities Who Struggle to Access Ideas


  • Refer to lesson plans.

Attention to Cultural Diversity


  • For students who do not participate in holiday activities, allow for another topic with suggestions and guidance.

Assessment

Refer to rubrics.



Writing Unit, Grade Three


Lesson 1

Kelley Rattinger                                           11/21/2013



SUBJECT: ELA TOPIC: Descriptive Writing

GRADE LEVEL: 3rd  

COMMON CORE STANDARDS:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.1a Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.1b Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.1c Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.1d Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.

CRITERIA

  • Student will be able to write 5 descriptive sentences with sentence starters and an idea box with 80% accuracy.

MATERIALS NEEDED 

  • Pens or pencils

  • Crayons

  • Worksheets with modifications

  • Monster pictures

  • Drawing paper

  • Whiteboard/markers

  • Pre-prepared non-descriptive story vs. descriptive

  • Pre-drawn monster picture

ANTICIPATORY SET (15 minutes)

  • The teacher will begin the lesson by explaining to students that in 3rd grade, all students become authors. The teacher will briefly review adjectives by pointing out the importance of descriptive words when trying to describe something (an example might be one of the student's hair/eyes). She will then read 2 stories, one without any descriptive writing and one with descriptive writing. She will ask the students which one they liked better, and encourage them to discuss why.

PREREQUISITE SKILLS

  • The student should be able to write in complete sentences.

  • The student should have a basic understanding of what an adjective is.

NECESSARY MODIFICATIONS

  • For students with learning disabilities who sometimes struggle to organizer ideas, sentence starters and an idea box will be provided.

PROCEDURE (70-85 minutes)

  • The teacher will open the lesson with the activity described in the “Anticipatory Set.”

  • The teacher will then hand out blank monsters and crayons and tell the students to first listen to the description of her monster. She will then read the description again sentence by sentence while the students draw what they hear. (20 minutes.)

  • When the students are done, she will reveal the picture of her monster and ask the students to compare their pictures with her. She will lead a discussion about why using descriptive words and adjectives are so important when writing for an audience. (5 minutes)

  • She will then explain to the students that they will be participating in a very fun activity and set up their work stations (folders up). She will hand each of them their own blank monster, and explain in detail the rules of the game. They will color in their own monster however they like. They will then write 5 descriptive sentences about their monsters that they will share with their partner. Their partner will draw what they hear.

  • Students will draw their monsters and write their sentences with guidance provided when necessary. (20 minutes)

  • The teacher will then ask the students to stop and will choose one student to read his description and the other student to draw. Repeat. (20 minutes)

  • The teacher will then tell the students that they can drop their folders and compare their pictures. She will ask students to point out differences from the original picture and discuss what sort of adjectives could have been used to better describe the picture.

CLOSURE 

  • The teacher will end the lesson by asking a few questions from the students. She will ask them why, after doing the activity, they think adjectives and description words are so important when writing.

INDEPENDENT PRACTICE 

  • Students will write their descriptive sentences independently.

EVALUATION 

  • The teacher will evaluate the students’ independent practice and look for 80% accuracy. An accurate sentence will be determined by the presence of at least one adjective.



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