The Board of Regents Progress Report



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The Board of Regents Progress Report

on

The Statewide Plan for Higher Education,

2004-2012

The University of the State of New York

The State Education Department

Albany, New York 12234

December 2008

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK
Regents of The University
Robert M. Bennett, Chancellor, B.A., M.S. Tonawanda

Merryl H. Tisch, Vice Chancellor, B.A., M.A., Ed.D. New York

Saul B. Cohen, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. New Rochelle

James C. Dawson, A.A., B.A., M.S., Ph.D. Peru

Anthony S. Bottar, B.A., J.D. Syracuse

Geraldine D. Chapey, B.A., M.A., Ed.D. Belle Harbor

Arnold B. Gardner, B.A., LL.B. Buffalo

Harry Phillips, 3rd, B.A., M.S.F.S. Hartsdale



Joseph E. Bowman, Jr., B.A., M.L.S., M.A., M.Ed., Ed.D Albany

James R. Tallon, Jr., B.A., M.A. Binghamton

Milton L. Cofield, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D. Rochester

Roger B. Tilles, B.A., J.D. Great Neck

Karen Brooks Hopkins, B.A., M.F.A. Brooklyn



Charles R. Bendit, B.A. Manhattan

Betty A. Rosa, B.A., M.S. in Ed., M.S. in Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D…………………………. Bronx

Lester W. Young, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ed. D ……………………………………………….. Oakland Gardens


President of The University and Commissioner of Education

Richard P. Mills


Senior Deputy Commissioner of Education, P-16

Johanna Duncan-Poitier


Associate Commissioner for the Office of Higher Education

Joseph P. Frey

  The State Education Department does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, religion, creed, disability, marital status, veteran status, national origin, race, gender, genetic predisposition or carrier status, or sexual orientation in its educational programs, services and activities. Portions of this publication can be made available in a variety of formats, including braille, large print or audio tape, upon request. Inquiries concerning this policy of nondiscrimination should be directed to the Department’s Office for Diversity, Ethics, and Access, Room 530, Education Building, Albany, NY 12234. Requests for additional copies of this publication may be made by contacting the Publications Sales Desk, Room 309, Education Building, Albany, NY 12234.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Letter of Transmittal 7
Summary of Findings 9
Introduction 17


  1. Maximizing Success for All Higher Education Students 19




  1. High Educational Quality 19

  2. Articulation 34

  3. Affordability 41

  4. Closing Performance Gaps 54

  5. Students with Disabilities 69




  1. Smooth Student Transition from PreK-12 to Higher Education 75




  1. Preparation for College 75

  2. Information and Assistance in Preparing for College 85




  1. Meeting New York’s Needs through Graduate Programs

and through Research 92


  1. Strong Graduate Programs to Meet the State’s Needs 92

  2. Creation of New Knowledge through Research 100




  1. Qualified Professionals for Every Community throughout the State 106




  1. An Adequate Supply of Qualified Professionals 106

  2. An Adequate Supply of Qualified Teachers, School Leaders,

and other School Professionals 110



  1. A Balanced and Flexible Regulatory Environment to Support

Excellence 127


  1. Encouraging a Highly Effective System 127

  2. Funding a Highly Effective System 137

Figures and Tables
Page
Figure 1. NYS 6-Year Baccalaureate Graduation Rates by Race/Ethnicity,

All Students 57

Figure 2. NYS 6-Year Baccalaureate Graduation Rates by Race/Ethnicity,

Opportunity Program Students 58

Figure 3. Liberty Partnership Program Data 84
Table 1. Fall Degree-Credit Enrollment in Institutions of Higher Education 18

Table 2. New York State: Racial/Ethnic Distribution of Population, 2006;

2005-06 High School Graduates; and Fall 2006 Higher Education

Enrollment 18

Table 3. First-Time Students in Baccalaureate Programs at Four-Year

Institutions Persisting from their First to Second Year, Fall 2004 to

Fall 2005, Fall 2005 to Fall 2006, and Fall 2006 to Fall 2007, by

Sector 22

Table 4. First-Time Students in Associate Degree Programs at Two-Year

Institutions Persisting from their First to Second Year, Fall 2004 to

Fall 2005, Fall 2005 to Fall 2006, and Fall 2006 to Fall 2007, by

Sector 22

Table 5. Proportion of First-Time Entrants Earning Baccalaureate Degrees

from the Same Institution in Six Years, by Sector 23

Table 6. Proportion of First-Time Entrants Earning Associate Degrees from

the Same Institution in Three Years, by Sector 23

Table 7. First-Time Entrants Earning Degrees from Some Institution, including

Transfers to Another New York Institution 24

Table 8. State University of New York, Baccalaureate Graduation Rate for All

Matriculated Entering Students, 2004 – 2007 26

Table 9. Placement of Graduates of Occupational Associate Degree and

Certificate Programs, Institutions Aided under the Carl D.

Perkins Vocational-Technical Education Act, 2003 – 2005 27

Table 10. Ratio of Full-Time Undergraduate Transfers from Two-Year Colleges

to Full-Time Undergraduate Enrollment at Two-Year Colleges in the

Preceding Year, 2003, 2005, 2007 35

Table 11. State University of New York, Ratio of Full-Time Undergraduate

Transfers to Full-Time Undergraduates at Two-Year Colleges the Year

Before, Fall 2003 – Fall 2007 35

Table 12. Full-Time Undergraduates Enrolled at New York Four-Year

Institutions who Transferred from New York Two-Year Institutions 36

Table 13. State University of New York, Students Transferring into SUNY

Four-Year Institutions fro Two-Year Institutions, Fall 2002 – Fall 2007 38

Table 14. Full-Time Undergraduate Transfers from Institutions Outside the State,

2005 and 2007, by Sector and Level of New York Institution 40
Table 15. Annual Undergraduate Tuition and Fees, by Sector,

2001-02 – 2008-0940 43

Table 16. Percent Change in Undergraduate Tuition and Fees, by Sector,

2001-02 – 2008-09 44

Table 17. Proportion of Undergraduates Receiving TAP Awards or Pell

Grants, 2003-04 and 2005-06, by Level and Sector of Institution 46

Table 18. Student Financial Aid at New York Colleges and Universities

2003-04 – 2005-06 48

Table 19. Undergraduate Need-Based Grants Provided by Selected States,

FTE Undergraduate Enrollment, and Average Grant per FTE,

2006-07 51

Table 20. Matriculated Full-Time Entrants Earning Baccalaureate Degrees

in 6 years from Institution Originally Entered, by Racial/Ethnic Category,

2003 – 2007 56

Table 21. Matriculated Full-Time Entrants through Opportunity Programs

Earning Baccalaureate degrees in 6 Years from the Institution Originally

Entered, by Racial/Ethnic Category, 2003 – 2007 56

Table 22. Matriculated Full-Time Entrants Earning Associate degrees in 3

Years from Institution Originally Entered, by Racial/Ethnic Category,

2003 – 2007 58

Table 23. Matriculated Full-Time Entrants through Opportunity Programs

Earning Associate degrees in 3 years from the Institution Originally

Entered, by Racial/Ethnic Category, 2003 – 2007 59

Table 24. State University of New York EOP Graduation Rates, 2001 – 2005 60

Table 25. First-Time Baccalaureate Students Persisting from their First to

Second Year, Fall 2004 to Fall 2005, Fall 2005 to Fall 2006, and Fall

2006 to Fall 2007, by Racial/Ethnic Category 60

Table 26. First-Time Baccalaureate Students Admitted through Opportunity

Programs Persisting from their First to Second Year, Fall 2004 to

Fall 2005, Fall 2005 to Fall 2006, and Fall 2006 to Fall 2007, by

Racial/Ethnic Category 61

Table 27. First-Time Associate Degree Students Persisting from their First to

Second Year, Fall 2004 to Fall 2005, Fall 2005 to Fall 2006, Fall 2006

to Fall 2007, by Racial/Ethnic Category 61

Table 28. First-Time Associate Degree Students Admitted through

Opportunity Programs Persisting from their First to Second Year,

Fall 2004 to Fall 2005, Fall 2005 to Fall 2006, Fall 2006 to Fall 2007,

By Racial/Ethnic Category 62

Table 29. Time to Baccalaureate Degree, by Racial/Ethnic Category of Recipient,

2003 – 2007 67

Table 30. Enrollment of Students with Disabilities, 2003 – 2007 70

Table 31. State University of New York, Students with Disabilities Transferring

into Four-Year Campuses from Two-Year Institutions, 2003 – 2007 71

Table 32. Graduation Rates of First-Time Students with Disabilities Compared to

All First-Time Students, 2004 – 2007 71
Table 33. Number of Pupils Scoring 65 or Higher on Selected Regents

Examinations, 2002-03 – 2006-07 76

Table 34. First-Time Baccalaureate Students Persisting from their First to Second

Year, Fall 2004 to Fall 2005, Fall 2005 to Fall 2006, and Fall 2006 to

Fall 2007, by Number of Remedial Courses Taken 77

Table 35. First-Time Associate Degree Students Persisting from their First to

Second Year, Fall 2004 to Fall 2005, Fall 2005 to Fall 2006, and

Fall 2006 to Fall 2007, by Number of Remedial Courses Taken 78

Table 36. Three-Year Associate Degree Graduation Rates by High School

Grade Point Average, USNY-wide, 2005, 2005, 2006, 2007 78

Table 37. Six-Year Baccalaureate Graduation Rates by SAT/ACT Scores,

USNY-wide, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 79

Table 38. Public High School Graduation Rates, New York State, 2006 – 2007 83

Table 39. Number of Full- and Part-Time Faculty at Four-Year and Higher

Institutions, by Sector and USNY-wide, 2003, 2005, 2007 93

Table 40. Number of Full-and Part-Time Faculty at Two-Year Colleges, by

Sector and USNY-wide, 2003, 2005, 2007 94

Table 41. State University of New York, Share of Faculty Composed of Minority

Group Members, Fall 2003 – Fall 2007 96

Table 42. State University of New York, Share of Faculty that is Female,

Fall 2003 – Fall 2007 97

Table 43. Master’s and Doctoral Degrees Awarded, 2003-04 – 2006-07, by

Sector 97

Table 44. Research and Development Expenditures at Higher Education

Institutions, Selected States, 2002 and 2006 101

Table 45. Change in Research and Development Expenditures at Higher

Education Institutions, Selected States, 2002 – 2006, Total and Per

Capita 102

Table 46. State University of New York, Invention Disclosures, Patents, Royalty

Income and Start-Ups, 2004-05 – 2007-08 103

Table 47. Professional Licensees Registered to Practice in New York State 107

Table 48. Cycle Time for First Teaching Certificates, 2006-07 – 2008-09 115

Table 49. Teacher Certification Examination results, Statewide, 2004-05 –

2006-07 120

Table 50. Review of Proposed CUNY and SUNY Academic Programs by SED 133

Table 51. New York State Expenditures for Higher Education, 2001-02,

2003-04 – 2007-08 138

Table 52. Funding Per Full-Time Equivalent Student, Public Institutions in New

York and Nationwide, 2001-02, 2005-06, and 2006-07 139

Table 53. Invest in CUNY, Invest in New York Campaign 142



THE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT / THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK / ALBANY, NY 12234

SENIOR DEPUTY COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION – P-16

Office of Elementary, Middle, Secondary and Continuing Education

Office of Higher Education


July 1, 2009

The Honorable David A. Paterson

Governor

State of New York

State Capitol

Albany, NY 12224


The Honorable Malcolm A. Smith

Majority Leader

New York State Senate

State Capitol, Room 332

Albany, NY 12247
The Honorable Sheldon Silver

Speaker


New York State Assembly

Legislative Office Building, Room 932



Albany, NY 12246
Dear Governor Paterson, Majority Leader Smith, and Speaker Silver:
On behalf of the Board of Regents and the higher education institutions of The University of the State of New York, I am pleased to send you the Board of Regents Progress Report on implementation of the Statewide Plan for Higher Education, consistent with Section 237 of the Education Law.
In June 2005, the Board adopted a Statewide Plan for the period 2004 through 2012 that reflected both its concerns and priorities and those of our public, independent, and proprietary higher education institutions. The colleges and universities, and the State Education Department, identified their planned actions to address those priorities.
Since then, The City University of New York, the State University of New York, our independent institutions, our proprietary colleges, and the Department have carried out many of those planned actions. In addition, the Statewide Plan for Higher Education will continue to be instrumental as the Board and the Department work with our partners in the higher education community to maximize success for all higher education students, smooth the transition for students from Pre-K – 12 to higher education, meet New York’s needs through graduate education and research, supply qualified professionals for every community, and establish a balanced and flexible regulatory environment to support excellence.
We are proud of the steps the higher education institutions of The University of the State of New York and the Department have taken to address the Board’s priorities and to implement their own long-range master plans.
Respectfully submitted,

Johanna Duncan-Poitier


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