Teaching Classroom Behaviors and Skills that Encourage Collaboration



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Teaching Classroom Behaviors and Skills that Encourage Collaboration

  • Herrell Chapter 27
  • Main | English
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  •  DeXus - Discourse Nexus 3.0    An international discourse studies  summer school   August 15th-20th, 2005 
  •  Location  Centre for Discourse Studies  Aalborg University Denmark
  •  Invited guests  Jan Blommaert, Institute of Education, University of London Angel Lin, City University of Hong Kong Michael Silverstein, The University of Chicago, USA Terry Threadgold, Cardiff University, Wales
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  • DeXus is the name given to the Discourse Nexus alternative summer school for discourse studies to be held yearly in the Centre for Discourse Studies at Aalborg University. DeXus, which took place very successfully for the first time in August 2003. The code 3.0 signifies the third version, the third actualisation, with progressively refined versions to come. DeXus will focus on innovative research in discourse studies and its application to a variety of settings and data sets, using a mix of lectures, workshops, group work and discussion sessions. 
  • Aalborg University, founded in 1974, has successfully established a progressive pedagogical model as the foundation for its curriculum across all Faculties. Every semester, students at Aalborg form groups and take relevant courses in order to independently solve a problem they themselves have formulated based on their studies. They are officially appointed a vejleder -- a ‘path leader’ or 'wayfinder' -- whose job it is to guide the students to a successful solution to their ‘problem’ over the course of the semester. In conclusion, students write a project report and are assessed on their work in a group discussion/oral exam at the end of the semester.
  • DeXus draws upon this tradition to experiment with a problem-based, project-centred research summer school for postgraduates and scholars in the field of discourse studies. The core concept is the free play of ideas within the thematic context of group-derived problems and reflexive project work developed during the six fruitful days of DeXus — Dissective, Dissensual, Dextrous and Delectable!
  • The goal of DeXus is to create a space in which attendees — invited guests, students, postgrads and established scholars — can discuss the latest moves in discourse studies, apply approaches in discourse studies to ‘real world’ problems, learn hands-on in a positive environment and find new relays between academic work and social change. 
  • We invited a number of guests to play the role of ‘wayfinders’ or 'midwives'. Their job is to provide a range of resources for learning: to give lectures, to hold workshops, to promote discussion and reflection, to clarify methods, and to illustrate analysis.
  • Following the first day of keynote lectures by the invited guests, which will establish a common framework, there are parallel workshops on the second day.
  • Descriptions of the LECTURES AND WORKSHOPS are now online!
  • At the end of the first and second days, and for the following two whole working days, we concentrate on group work. Each group will work on a set of problems that are to be decided by the groups themselves, which may or may not be derived from the lectures and workshops on the first two days. Furthermore, the wayfinders are assigned in pairs to work with a specific thematic group on each of days 2, 3 and 5. We trust that the pairings of wayfinders from different disciplinary backgrounds generates novel ideas and fruitful challenges that benefit the problem-based learning. On the last day, all groups come together to report on their findings, solutions and applications, with commentary and discussion from the wayfinders.
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  • The poster session on the first day is for those who wish to present their research publicly.
  • The summer school is international and open to all scholars, researchers and PhD                                                               students. Student helpers from our own programmes will be taking part to assist participants.
  • DeXus will interest students and scholars who work in the diverse fields of discourse studies, particularly mediated discourse analysis, critical discourse analysis, interactional sociolinguistics, linguistic anthropology, multimodal discourse analysis, educational discourse analysis, social semiotics, practice theory, identity and discourse, gender and discourse.
  • In relation to theorising and analysing discourse, DeXus themes this year include: 
  • Globalisation/Localisation
  • Belonging/Citizenship/Linking/Relationality
  • Change/Intervention/Critique
  • Identity/Gender/'Race'/Ethnicity/Kinship
  • Mediation/Modality/Action/Practice
  • Structure/Ordering/Organisation
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  • Wireless LAN facilities are offered on campus during Dexus. Bring your laptop computer with an installed wireless 802.11b Wi-Fi card (or MAC Airport), and you can be mobile and surf the web, read email, take part in web chat, and so on. We integrate Wi-Fi into the DeXus group work by using open source social software (such as wiki's, blogs and Skype), which enables us to chat, share files and collaborate on discussion topics. Internet-connected PCs will be available in each room, and extra laptops will be available for groups to use. Multimedia equipment, such as digital video cameras, microphones, video players, projectors and televisions, will also be available for use.
  • For more academic information, contact Paul McIlvenny or Pirkko Raudaskoski.
  • Registration for DeXus 3.0 can be completed online. The registration deadline is 15th June 2005. After registration you will immediately be sent an invoice with which you can pay the fee using your local banking system. Payment of the fee should be received by 15th July at the latest. 
  •   Registration is closed   
  • The participation fee is 3000 Danish kroner (approx. 400 Euro),  which covers administrative costs, tea/coffee and lunches every working day, and one evening drinks reception (Monday) and one evening dinner (Thursday). 
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  • Payment of the fee secures your registration. Please contact Bente Vestergaard if you need further assistance with registration and other practicalities.
  • Under special circumstances (eg. students or scholars travelling from the Global South) a reduced fee can be offered (please apply directly to the secretariat and an application form will be sent). 
  • Location, travel and accommodation information is available on this web site. Travel and accommodation is the responsibility of the participant.
  • A poster (PDF) for DeXus 3.0 is available. Please download, print, post and redistribute...
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  • Note: PDF files require Acrobat Reader.                                        
  • The summer school is supported by the Centre for Discourse Studies and the Doctoral School in Human Centred Informatics.
  • Provisional schedule
  • The summer school will run daily from 9:00 to 17:00 (Monday to Friday) and 9:00 to 16:00 on Saturday. The precise schedule may be altered. Unless otherwise stated, coffee/tea, lunches and reception drinks on Monday plus evening dinner on Thursday are included in the registration fee.
  • Invited Guests
  • Jan Blommaert
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  • Jan Blommaert is currently Professor of African Linguistics and Sociolinguistics in the Department of African Languages and Cultures at Ghent University, Belgium. He will be starting a new post as Professor and Chair of Languages in Education at the Institute of Education at the University of London in the Autumn.
  • He is currently coordinating an international research group sponsored by the Belgian National Science Foundation (Flanders) on 'language, power and identity'. The activities of the LPI group are aimed at deepening theoretical and empirical understandings of language in social life, focused on inequality and on a materialistic view of language as a resource in people's lives. Jan is also intensively involved in analyses of African asylum seekers' narratives (together with Katrijn Maryns) and on grassroots literacy in the Congo. Both projects can be connected to his longstanding interest in 'impurity' in language, eg. code-switching and mixing. Both projects have also generated a keen interest in narrative. Less intensive but nevertheless substantial is his interest in popular culture in Africa, specifically the way in which this popular culture transpires through all sorts of linguistic and broader semiotic phenomena. A theoretical spin-off of his work is language ideologies. He has compiled a series of                                    studies on 'language ideological debates' in 1999 (Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter), in an attempt to formulate some ways in which sociolinguistics and history could be blended in analyses of language-ideological processes. He is also keenly involved in issues of migration and (more recently) asylum. He is currently exploring the possibilities of a project on the relation between space (neighbourhoods, cities) and ideologies in the field of migration.
  • His new book is entitled Discourse: A Critical Introduction, published in 2005 by Cambridge University Press.
  • Publications include:
  • Blommaert, Jan & Verschueren, Jef (Eds.) (1991). The Pragmatics of Intercultural and International Communication. Amsterdam: Benjamins.
  • Blommaert, Jan (1991). How Much Culture Is There in Intercultural Communication? In Blommaert, J. & Verschueren, J. (Eds.), The Pragmatics of Intercultural and International Communication, Amsterdam: Benjamins.
  • Verschueren, Jef, Östman, Jan-Ola & Blommaert, Jan (Eds.) (1995). Handbook of Pragmatics: Manual. Amsterdam: Benjamins.
  • Blommaert, Jan & Bulcaen, Chris (Eds.) (1998). Political Linguistics. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  • Blommaert, Jan (1998). Introduction: Language and Politics, Language Politics and political linguistics. In Blommaert, Jan & Bulcaen, Chris (Eds.), Political Linguistics, Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  • Blommaert, Jan & Verschueren, Jef (1998). Debating Diversity: Analysing the Discourse of Tolerance. London: Routledge.
  • Blommaert, Jan (Ed.) (1999). Language Ideological Debates. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
  • Blommaert, Jan (1999). Reconstructing the Sociolinguistic Image of Africa: Grassroots Writing in Shaba (Congo). Text 9(2): 175-200.
  • Blommaert, Jan (2000). Speech Genres and Other Questions on Fusion. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 3(2): 109-111.
  • Blommaert, Jan & Bulcaen, Chris (2000). Critical Discourse Analysis. Annual Review of Anthropology 29: 447-466.
  • Blommaert, Jan & Slembrouck, Stef (2000). Data Formulation as Text and Context: The (Aesth)ethics of Analysing Asylum Seekers' Narratives. Report LPI Working Paper nº 2: University of Gent. [Online]. Available: .
  • Blommaert, Jan (2001). Investigating Narrative Inequality: African Asylum Seekers' Stories in Belgium. Discourse & Society 12(4): 413-449.
  • Blommaert, Jan (2001). The Asmara Declaration as a Sociolinguistic Problem: Reflections on Scholarship and Linguistic Rights. Journal of Sociolinguistics 5(1): 131-142.
  • Blommaert, Jan (2001). Context is/as Critique. Critique of Anthropology 21(1): 13-32.
  • Blommaert, Jan (2001). Discourse and Critique: Part One. Critique of Anthropology 21(1): 5-12.
  • Maryns, Katrijn & Blommaert, Jan (2001). Stylistic and Thematic Shifting as a Narrative Resource: Assessing Asylum Seekers' Repertoires. Multilingua 20(1): 61-84.
  • Maryns, Katrijn & Blommaert, Jan (2002). Pretextuality and Pretextual Gaps: On De/Refining Linguistic Inequality. Pragmatics 12(1): 11-30.
  • Blommaert, Jan, Collins, James, et al. (2003). Introduction to special issue Ethnography, Discourse, and Hegemony. Pragmatics 13(1): 1-10.
  • Blommaert, Jan (2003). Commentary: A Sociolinguistics of Globalisation. Journal of Sociolinguistics 7(4): 607-623.
  • Blommaert, Jan (2005). Discourse: A Critical Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Angel Lin
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  • Dr Angel Lin is Associate Professor at City University of Hong Kong in the Department of English and Communication.
  • Her research and teaching have been centred on the connections between local face-to-face interactions and the larger sociocultural, historical, socioeconomic, institutional and political contexts in which they are situated. Broadly speaking, she works in the areas of discourse analysis, school ethnography, sociolinguistics, bilingual education, second language learning, teacher education as well as feminist cultural studies. With a background in ethnomethodology, conversation analysis and social theories, her theoretical orientations are phenomenological, sociocultural and critical. Her aim is to work towards more interaction and collaboration among researchers from different disciplines. Currently she is engaged in collaborative research projects with colleagues from the disciplines of political science, cultural studies, social work, psychology, and education.
  • Publications include:
  • Lin, A. M. Y. (1996). Engagement or immersion? Chaos or lack of capital? African-American children in whole language classrooms. [A book review of: Engaging children: community and chaos in the lives of young literacy learners]. Curriculum Inquiry: 26(3), 342-349.
  • Lin, A. M. Y. (1996). Bilingualism or linguistic segregation? Symbolic domination, resistance and code-switching in Hong Kong schools. Linguistics and Education: 8(1), pp. 49-84.
  • Lin, A. M. Y. (1997). Analysing the “language problem” discourses in Hong Kong: How official, academic and media discourses construct and perpetuate dominant models of language, learning and education. Journal of Pragmatics: 28, 427-440.
  • Lin, A. M. Y. (1997). Hong Kong children's rights to a culturally compatible English education. Hong Kong Journal of Applied Linguistics: 2(2), 23-48.
  • Lin, A. M. Y. (1997). The-child-in-the-world-with-others: Re-visioning Lensmire's critical re-visions of the writing workshop. Curriculum Inquiry: 27(4), 501-507.
  • Lin, A. M. Y. (1999). Doing-English-lessons in the reproduction or transformation of social worlds? TESOL Quarterly: 33(3), 393-412.
  • Lin, A. M. Y. (2000). Resistance and creativity in English
  • reading lessons in Hong Kong. Language, Culture and Curriculum: 12(3), 285-296.
  • Lin, A. M. Y. (2000). The personal is political: What Natasha Lvovich and Karen Ogulnick's personal stories tell us about identity, language learning, and sociocultural positioning. Linguistics and Education: 11(2), 169-173.
  • Lin, A. M. Y. (2000). Lively children trapped in an island of disadvantage: Verbal play of Cantonese working class schoolboys in Hong Kong. The International Journal of the Sociology of Language: 143, 63-83.
  • Lin, A. M. Y. (2001). Resistance and creativity in English reading lessons in Hong Kong. In Comber, B., & Simpson, A. (Eds.), Negotiating critical literacies in classrooms. Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Lin, A. M. Y. (2002). Genres of symbolic violence: Beauty
  • contest discourse practices in Hong Kong. In Li, D. C. S. (Ed.), Discourses in search of members. New York: American University Press.
  • Lin, A. M. Y. (2001). Symbolic domination and bilingual classroom practices in Hong Kong. In Heller, M., & Martin-Jones, M., (Eds.) Voices of authority: Education and linguistic difference. West Port, Connecticut: Ablex.
  • Lin, Angel M. Y. (2002) Modernity and the self: Explorations of the (Non-) Self-determining subject in South Korean TV dramas . M/C: A Journal of Media and Culture: 5(5). .
  • Lin, A. M. Y., Wang, W., Akamatsu, A., & Riazi, M. (2002). Appropriating English, expanding identities, and re-visioning the field: From TESOL to Teaching English for Glocalized Communication (TEGCOM). Journal of Language, Identity and Education: 1(4), 295-316.
  • Lin, A. M. Y., & Luk, J. (2002). Beyond progressive liberalism and cultural relativism: Towards critical postmodernist and sociohistorically situated perspectives in ethnographic classroom studies. Canadian Modern Language Review: 59(1), 97-124.
  • Lin, A. M. Y. et al. (2004). Women faculty of color in TESOL: Theorizing our lived experiences. TESOL Quarterly: 38(3), 487-504.
  • Lin, A. M. Y. (2004). Introducing a critical pedagogical curriculum: A reflexive account from feminist perspectives. In Norton, B., & Toohey, K. (Eds.), Critical pedagogies and language learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Lin, A. M. Y., & Lo, T. W. (2004). Discursive construction of knowledge and narratives about gangster youth: A critical discourse analysis of social work research interviews. In S. H. Ng, C. N. Candlin, & C. Y. Chiu (Eds.), Language matters: Communication, culture, and identity. Hong Kong: City University of Hong Kong Press.
  • Lin, A. M. Y., & Luk, J. C. M. (2005). Local creativity in the face of global domination: Insights of Bakhtin for teaching English for dialogic communication. In J. K. Hall, G. Vitanova, & L. Marchenkova. (Eds.), Dialogue with Bakhtin on second and foreign language learning: New Perspectives. Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Lin, A. M. Y. (2005). Developing critical, trans-disciplinary approaches to research on language in education. In Davison, C., & Cummins, J. (Eds.), Handbook of English language teaching. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  • Lin, A. M. Y., Wang, W., Akamatsu, A., & Riazi, M. (2005). Transnational TESOL Professionals and Teaching English for Glocalized Communication. In Canagarajah, A. S. (Ed.), Negotiating the global and local in language policy and practice. Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Lin, A. M. Y. (2005). Doing verbal play: Creative work of Cantonese working class schoolboys in Hong Kong. In, Abbas, A., & Erni, J. (Eds), Internationalizing cultural studies: An anthology. Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Lin, A., Kubota, R., Motha, S., Wang, W., & Wong, S. (2005). Theorizing experiences of Asian women faculty in second and foreign language education. In G. Li, & G. Beckett (Eds.), “Strangers” of the academy: Asian female scholars in higher education. Virginia: Stylus Publishing.
  • Luk, J. C. M., & Lin, A. M. Y. (2005) Classroom interactions as cross-cultural encounters. Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum
  • Lin, A. M. Y. (Ed.). (2005). Gender, ethnicity and identity: Symbolic struggles of everyday worlds. Mahweh: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Lin, A. M. Y., & Martin, P. (Eds.) (2005). Decolonization, globalization: Language-in-education policy and practice. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.
  • Lin, A. M. Y., & Man, E. Y. F. (to appear in 2006). Bilingual education: South East Asian perspectives. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.
  • Michael Silverstein
  •                          
  • Professor Michael Silverstein is currently the Charles F. Grey Distinguished Service Professor of Anthropology, of Linguistics, and of Psychology and in the Committee on Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities at The University of Chicago, USA.
  •                     He studies problems of language structure and function, language history and prehistory, the anthropology of language use, sociolinguistics, semiotics, language and cognition (and their development), and history of linguistic and ethnographic studies. His fieldwork in northwestern North America and northwestern Australia has been the basis of various descriptive, theoretical and generalizing contributions. He is also investigating language use and textuality as sites of contestation and transformation of cultural value in contemporary American society, rereading social and rhetorical theory in light of the anthropology of communication.
  • Publications include:
  • Silverstein, Michael (1992). The Uses and Utility of Ideology: Some Reflections. Pragmatics 2(3): 311-323.
  • Silverstein, Michael (1996). The Secret Life of Texts. In Silverstein, Michael & Urban, Greg (Eds.), Natural Histories of Discourse, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.
  • Silverstein, Michael & Urban, Greg (Eds.) (1996). Natural Histories of Discourse. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.
  • Silverstein, Michael (1996). Dynamics of Recent Linguistic Contact. In I. Goddard, ed., Handbook of North American Indians vol. 17, Languages. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, pp. 117-136.
  • Silverstein, Michael (1998). The Improvisational Performance of Culture in Realtime Discursive Practice. In K. Sawyer, ed., Creativity in Performance. Greenwich, CT: Ablex Publishing Corp., pp. 265-312.
  • Silverstein, Michael (1998). Contemporary Transformations of Local Linguistic Communities. Annual Review of Anthropology, 27:401-26.
  • Silverstein, Michael (1998). The Uses and Utility of Ideology. A Commentary. In B. Schieffelin, K. Woolard, P. Kroskrity, eds., Language Ideologies: Practice and Theory. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 123-145.
  • Silverstein, Michael (2000). Whorfianism and the Linguistic Imagination of Nationality. In P. Kroskrity, ed., Regimes of Language: Ideologies, Polities, and Identities. Santa Fe: School of American Research Press, pp. 85-138.
  • Silverstein, Michael (2003). Talking Politics: The substance of style from Abe to “W.” Chicago: Prickly Paradigm Press.
  • Silverstein, Michael (2003). Indexical order and the dialectics of sociolinguistic life. Language and Communication 23(3-4): 193-229 [Special issue on the work of M. Silverstein and students: Words and Beyond: Linguistic and Semiotic Studies of the Sociocultural Order. ed. P. Manning.]
  • Silverstein, Michael (2003). The whens and wheres – as well as hows – of ethnolinguistic recognition. Public Culture 15(3): 531-57.
  • Silverstein, Michael (2004). Boasian Cosmographic Anthropology and the Sociocentric Component of Mind. In R. Handler, ed., Significant Others. (History of Anthropology, Vol. 10) Univ. of Wisconsin Press, pp. 131-57.
  • Silverstein, Michael (2004). Languages/Cultures are dead! Long live the linguistic-cultural! In D. Segal & S. Yanagisako, eds., Unwrapping the Sacred Bundle. Durham: Duke University Press.
  • Silverstein, Michael (2004). 'Cultural' concepts and the language-culture nexus. Current Anthropology 45(5).
  • Silverstein, Michael (2004). Axes of –evals: Token vs. type interdiscursivity. Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 15(1).
  • Silverstein, Michael (forthcoming). The Life and Metalife of Language: Discursive Semiosis and Sociocultural Formations.
  • Terry Threadgold
  •                           
  • Professor Terry Threadgold is currently Head of the Cardiff School of Journalism Media & Cultural Studies at Cardiff University, Wales, and Director of the Migration Asylum and Refugee Group.
  •                                           She has published widely in the areas of postructuralist feminist discourse analysis, performance studies, feminist legal studies and on race, identity and nation in contexts of globalisation. She has also worked and published in the areas of postgraduate pedagogy and literacy and has a continuing interest in her current position in the training of journalists, journalism studies and media studies. Her current research interests include: media, representation and asylum; asylum, gender and citizenship and journalism and conflict.
  • She is General Editor of the international peer-reviewed journal Social Semiotics.
  • Publications include:
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  • DAY 1 15.8
  • 8:00-9:00
  • 9:00-9.15
  • 9:15-10:30
  • 10:30-10.45
  • 10.45-12.00
  • 12:00-13:00
  • 13.00-14.15
  • 14.15-14.30
  • 14.30-15.45
  • 15.45-16.30
  • 16.30-18.00
  • 18.00
  • 19:30
  • DAY 2 16.8
  • 9:00-12.00
  • 10.15-10.30
  • 12:00-13:00
  • 13.00-16.00
  • 14.15-14.30
  • 16:00-17:00
  • 19:00
  • DAY 3 17.8
  • 9:00-12.00
  • 10.15-10.30
  • 12:00-13:00
  • 13.00-17.00
  • 15.00-15.15
  • 19:00
  • DAY 4 18.8
  • Free day
  • 19:30
  • DAY 5 19.8
  • 9:00-12.00
  • 10.15-10.30
  • 12:00-13:00
  • 13.00-17.00
  • 15.00-15.15
  • 19:00
  • DAY 6 20.8
  • 8:30-12.00
  • 10.30-10.45
  • 12:00-13:00
  • 13.00-14.00
  • 14:00-16:00
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  • 16:00
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  • Ross Steele and Terry Threadgold, eds., (1988). Language Topics: Essays in Honour of Michael Halliday. 2 Volumes. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1988). 'Language and Gender', Australian Feminist Studies, Vol.3, pp. 41-70.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1988). 'The Genre Debate.', Southern Review, Vol. 21, Number 3, November 1988, pp.315-30.
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  • Terry Threadgold and Gunther Kress (1988). 'Toward a Social Theory of Genre.' Southern Review, Vol.21, Number 3, November 1988, pp.215-243.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1989). 'Talking about Genre: Ideologies and Incompatible Discourses.' Journal of Cultural Studies , Vol.3, No. 3, January 1989. pp.101-127.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1989). 'Paradigms of Culture and Semiosis: Grammatics for Cryptogrammars or Metalanguage for the Ineffable?' In Walter A. Koch ed., Evolution of Culture - Evolution der Kultur, proceedings of the International and Interdisciplinary Symposium, September 19-23,1988, Loveno di Menaggio, Italy. Bochum: Brockmeyer. pp. 157-224.
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  • Terry Threadgold and Anne Cranny-Francis eds., (1990). Feminine/Masculine and Representation. Sydney: Allen and Unwin.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1991). "Postmodernism, Systemic-Functional Linguistics as Metalanguage and the Practice of Cultural Critique". In: Frances Christie ed., Literacy in Social Processes: Proceedings from the Inaugural Australian Functional linguistics Conference held at Deakin University. Darwin: Centre for Studies in language Education, Northern Territory University.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1991). 'Legal Practice in the Courts: Discourse, Gender and Ethics', Australian Journal of Law and Society: 7: 39-70, Law and Literature Special Issue, ed. Kathe Boehringer and Peter Wilmshurst.
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  • Terry Threadgold, (1992), Christie, Frances, Devlin, Brian, Freebody, Peter, Luke, Allan, Martin, J.R., Threadgold Terry and Christine Walton (1992). Teaching Critical Social Literacy: A Project of National Significance on the Preservice Preparation of Teachers for teaching English Literacy. Report to the Federal Government. Vols. I & II. Canberra: Department of Education, Employment and Training.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1993). 'Performing Genre: Violence, the Making of Protected Subjects, and the Discourses of Critical literacy and Radical Pedagogy.' Plenary paper delivered at the International Domains of Literacy Conference, University of London Institute of Education, September 1992. Published in: Domains of Literacy, Changing English, Volume 1, Number 1, pp. 2-31.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1993). 'Genre', Volume 3, The Encyclopaedia of Language and Linguistics. Pergamon and Aberdeen University Press.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1993). 'Structuralism and Semiotics, Literary', Volume 8, The Encyclopaedia of Language and Linguistics. Pergamon and Aberdeen University Press.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1994). Grammar, Genre and the Ownership of Literacy, Idiom, Vol.XXIX, No.2, August 1994, pp. 20-28.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1994). The Poetics of Child Abuse. In: P. Williams and G. Neville Turner eds, The Happy Couple. Proceedings of the Law and Literature Conference, Monash 1991. Federation Press.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1994). Linguistic Utopias, Political Ventriloquism and ALBE. Fine Print, Vol. 16, No. 4, pp.10 - 16.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1994). ‘Plain English: The Politics of Working on the Margins’, Polemic, October, pp. 70-82.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1997). Narrative and Legal Texts: Telling Stories about Women Who Kill, invited paper presented at the UTS Ultimo Seminar Series in May 1996, UTS Review: Cultural studies and New Writing, Vol. 3, No. 1, May 1997, pp. 56-73.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1997). Cultural Theory, Community Politics and the Media, in Paolo Bartolini, K. Lynch and S. Kendall eds., Intellectuals and Publics: Essays on Cultural Theory and Practice. Melbourne: School of English, Latrobe University, pp. 117-130.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1997). Critical Literacies and the Teaching of English. In: Peter Freebody, Sandy Muspratt and Allan Luke eds., Constructing Critical Literacies: Teaching and Learning Textual Practice, New York: Hampton Press, pp. 353-387.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1997). Regulative Fictions: Translations and Performing Subversions, Law, Text, Culture, Vol. 3, 210-231.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1997). The Social Media of Semiosis. Article 14 In: Roland Posner, Klaus Robering and Thomas A. Sebeok eds., Semiotics: A Handbook on the Sign-Theoretic Foundations of Nature and Culture. Berlin - New York: Walter de Gruyter, pp.384-404.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1997). Performativity, Regulative Fictions, Huge Stabilities - Framing Battered Woman’s Syndrome, Law, Text, Culture, Vol. 3, 1997, pp. 210-231.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1997). An Interview with Terry Threadgold on Critical Discourse Analysis with Barbara Kamler, Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, Vol. 18, No. 3, 437-452.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1997). Feminist Poetics: Poeisis, Performance, Histories. London: Routledge.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1998), ‘ Women and Language’, in Australian Feminism: A Comnpanion, ed., B. Caine, M. Gatens, E. Grahame, J. Larbelestier, S. Watson and E. Webby. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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  • Terry Threadgold (1999). Law as/of Property, Judgment as Dissension: Feminist and postcolonial Inerventions in the Networks, American Journal of Law and Semiotics, 12(4): 1999.
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  • Terry Threadgold (2000). Introduction to Poststructuralism and Language, in Cate Poynton and Alison Lee eds., Culture and Text, Sydney: Allen & Unwin.
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  • Terry Threadgold (2000). ‘Telling Tales out of School’, Studies in the Education of Adults, Spring 2000.
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  • Penny Pether and Terry Threadgold (2000). Feminist Methodologies in Discourse Analysis: Sex, Property, Equity? in Cate Poynton and Alison Lee eds., Culture and Text. Sydney: Allen & Unwin.
  •   
  • Terry Threadgold (2000). Feminist Interpretations and Challenges, Social Semiotics, Vol. 10, No. 1, 2000.
  •   
  • Terry Threadgold (2000). Versions of Multiculturalism: Nation, Race and Risk, Communal/Plural, Vol. 8, No.1.
  •   
  • Terry Threadgold (2000). ‘When Home is always a Foreign Place: Diaspora, Dialogue, Translations’, Communal/Plural, Vol. 8, No. 2, 2000.
  •   
  • Terry Threadgold (2001). Making Theories for Different Worlds: making critical differences, in Peter Freebody, Sandy Muspratt and Bronwyn Dwyer eds., Difference, Silence and Textual Practice: Studies in Critical Literacy. New Jersey: Hampton Press.
  •   
  • Terry Threadgold (2002). ‘Networks of Bodies and Texts: Accidents and/as Social Semiotics’, in Zeichenprocesse in Komplexen Systemen – Sign Processes in Complex Systems. Akten des 7. Internationalen Kongresses der International Association for Semiotic Studies, Ed., Walter Schmitz. Dresden: Thelem. (Dresdner Studien zur Semiotik – Dresden Studies in Semiotics: 350 pp. + CD-Rom).
  •   
  • Terry Threadgold and Barbara Kamler (2003). ‘Translating Difference’ Journal of Intercultural Studies 24(2).
  •   
  • Buchanan, Sara,Grillo Bethan and Terry Threadgold (2003). What’s the Story? Sangatte: A case study of media coverage of asylum and refugee issues. Edited Bethan Grillo and Tom Wengraf. London: Article 19. Summary report.
  •   
  • Buchanan, Sara, Grillo-Simpson, Bethan and Terry Threadgold (2003). What’s The Story? Results from Research into Media Coverage of Refugees and Asylum Seekers in the UK. London: Article 19.
  •   
  • Terry Threadgold (2003), ‘Cultural Studies, Critical Theory and Critical Discourse Analysis: Histories, Remembering and Futures’, LinguistikOnline. Online: .
  •   
  • Terry Threadgold (2004), ‘Epilogue: Writing Cultural Studies Differently’. Special Issue ed., Greg Gow and Amanda Wise, Writing Refugeee Lives: Urban Ethnographies and Affective Communities, Social Analysis: The International Journal of Cultural and Social Practice, Fall Issue, 48(3).
  •   
  • Terry Threadgold (forthcoming 2005), Performing Theories of Narrative: Theorising Narrative Performance, in Joanna Thornborrow and Jennifer Coates Eds., The Sociolinguistics of Narrative. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  •   
  • Book in Preparation: With Justin Lewis, Rod Brookes and Nick Mosdell, The Embedding of Reporters in the Iraq War. Peter Lang Publishers.
  •   
  • Registration (+laptop/network setup)
  •   
  • Opening welcome
  •   
  • Lecture 1 - Professor Jan Blommaert
  •   
  • Coffee, tea, fruit etc.
  •   
  • Lecture 2 - Professor Terry Threadgold
  •   
  • Lunch
  •   
  • Lecture 3 - Professor Michael Silverstein
  •   
  • Coffee, tea, cake etc.
  •   
  • Lecture 4 - Associate Professor Angel Lin
  •   
  • Poster session
  •   
  • Groupwork preparation
  •   
  • Reception (drinks and snacks)
  •   
  • Dinner (not included in fee)
  •   
  • Workshops
  •   
  • Coffee, tea, fruit etc.
  •   
  • Lunch
  •   
  • Workshops
  •   
  • Coffee, tea, cake etc.
  •   
  • Groupwork meeting
  •   
  • Dinner (not included in fee)
  •   
  • Thematic groupwork
  •   
  • Coffee, tea, fruit etc.
  •   
  • Lunch
  •   
  • Thematic groupwork
  •   
  • Coffee, tea, cake etc.
  •   
  • Dinner (not included in fee)
  •   
  •   
  • Trip to Aalborg Art Museum designed by the Finnish architect Alvar Aalto
  •   
  • DeXus Dinner
  •   
  • Thematic groupwork
  •   
  • Individual consultations with guests
  •   
  • Coffee, tea, fruit etc.
  •   
  • Lunch
  •   
  • Thematic groupwork
  •   
  • Coffee, tea, cake etc.
  •   
  • Dinner (not included in fee)
  •   
  • Groupwork presentations
  •   
  • Coffee, tea, fruit etc.
  •   
  • Commentary on presentations (guests)
  •   
  • Lunch
  •   
  • Reflection and action
  •   
  • Discussion and evaluation
  •   
  • Closing of summer school
  • From the first day, the teacher must make her students aware that
  • they are members of a community…for decision making and
  • classroom maintenance…beginning of community building!
  • Step by step:
  • Brainstorm classroom needs
  • Encourage suggestions
  • Make time to evaluate plan
  • Conduct periodic class evaluation
  • discussions
  • Examples:
  • Taking rollpair Emptying sharpenerpair
  • Collecting homeworkpair Cleaning boardteam
  • Taking lunch countpair Emptying trash canspair
  • Filling papersteam Setting up stations/centersteam
  • Distributing materialsteam Putting up chairsteam


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