Summarizing and responding how Do I summarize?



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SUMMARIZING AND RESPONDING

How Do I Summarize?

  • Read, Highlight, Annotate
  • What’s the Essay About? (1-3 words=Topic)
  • How does the author feel about it? (Main Idea)
    • Look for key sentences that contain

Summarizing

  • Locate Major Details and Lesser Details
  • MAJOR DETAILS (Supporting Points)
  • LESSER DETAILS
  • MAIN IDEA

Summarizing

  • Separate MAJOR DETAILS from LESSER DETAILS
      • examples
      • Illustrations
      • narratives used as examples

Summaries

  • Introduction
  • Body
  • Conclusion
  • Introduce author, article title, author’s thesis.
  • Author’s main points. How does he or she support the thesis?
  • Any other information that the reader needs to know to clarify the main points.
  • Conclude your summary using the author’s conclusion. How does the author conclude the essay? Do they state the importance of their argument?

A Good Summary

  • Contains major details
  • Is in your own words, perhaps using a key phrase or two from the text
  • Put quotation marks “ ” around 3 words or more taken from the article
  • Contains any explanation to clarify major details

Responding Guide

  • RESPONDING TO A TEXT
  • 1. Summarize to check your understanding
  • 2. Link the reading to your own experience
  • 3. Analyze the reading
  • Devise critical questions
  • Use annotation
  • Keep a response journal
  • Use a reading response worksheet

Responding Guide

What is Personal Experience?

  • age
  • experiences
  • gender
  • location
  • political beliefs
  • influence of parents and peers
  • education
  • past experience
  • culture/subculture
  • expectations
  • social class
  • Our reading & writing is shaped by who we are.

Responding Guide

  • 2. Link the reading to your own experience
  • Look for info in the text that can be related to other life experiences. Think of other familiar situations or examples.
  • Think BEYOND the reading.
  • Use key-word response method for generating ideas
  • What was you initial response? Anger? Shock? Annoyance? This is how your opinion is formed.

Responding Guide

Responding Guide

  • 3. Analyze the text
  • Analysis of a text is our opportunity to communicate an aspect of the essay, such as the author’s fairness or accuracy, his or her method of presentation, the quality of the supporting evidence or the intended audience.

Responding Guide

  • 3. Analyze the text
  • Methods of analysis
  • Devise critical questions and then answer them
  • Use annotation. As you read, record your reactions.
  • Keep a response journal to record questions and reactions to the reading. This can be done by way of outlines, diagrams, drawings, lists, columns,
  • paraphrasing. There is no right or wrong way.

Responding Guide

  • 3. Analyze the Text
  • Use a Reading Response Worksheet
  • Title:
  • Author:
  • First Impression:
  • Summary:
  • Connections to your own experience:
  • Analysis (issue, aspect, feature, problem):

Responding

  • Section 1: The introductory paragraph is a summary of the article with a response-based thesis (main idea statement) at the end.
  • Section 2: The body paragraphs will:
    • Begin with topic sentences that defends your thesis by linking an idea from the text to an idea of your own.
    • Include personal experience connections
    • Include textual evidence to support your opinions
  • Section 3: The conclusion will review your main ideas and thesis.

Sample Response Ideas

  • Sample Thesis: I think Merline is right to argue that SUVs are a good idea for some people and that they are being overly criticized.
  • Topic Sentence: I agree with Merline that SUVs’ safety features are a much bigger advantage than the disadvantages of roll-over issues.

Using Textual Evidence

  • Textual Evidence: The most compelling evidence Merline offers is that the “fatality rate on the highways has dropped 27.4 percent” since SUVs started becoming popular (546).
  • Incorporate the mini-quote into your own sentence.
  • Use quotation marks and a page number.
    • Why does this make you feel that way: If people are buying more SUVs and dying less often, to my mind that has to be a good thing. I know that when I’m buying a car, my own safety is one of the biggest things I’m concerned about.

Sample 1st paragraph (Summary)

  • In Why Consumers Have Been Choosing SUVs” by John Merline, the author argues that SUVs are not the polluting and dangerous vehicles the critics claim they are. Even though SUVs are criticized for their weight and structure which cause accidents, they protect people better than cars. SUVs consume a lot of gas, but there are plenty that use fuel more effectively and economically. SUVs are charged with causing global warming; however they are not a major contributing factor. Despite some disadvantages of SUVs, Merline argues that consumers know which are best for them and their needs. I think Merline is right to argue that SUVs are a good idea for some people and that they are being overly criticized.
  • Summary
  • Thesis

Sample response paragraph

  • I agree with Merline that SUVs’ safety features are a much bigger advantage than the disadvantages of roll-over issues. The most compelling evidence Merline offers is that the “fatality rate on the highways has dropped 27.4 percent” since SUVs started becoming popular (546). If people are buying more SUVs and dying less often, to my mind that has to be a good thing. I know that when I’m buying a car, my own safety is one of the biggest things I’m concerned about. Currently, I drive a tiny little Toyota and have been considering trading it in for an SUV so that I’m safer on the road. It’s not just that my car is poor in the winter, but that semis and other large vehicles have a hard time seeing me. If I drove an SUV I’d be easier to see and it’d be easier to see what was going on around me.
  • Topic Sentence
  • Textual Evidence
  • Personal Experience

Response Essay Structure

  • Summary
  • Response
  • Introduce the essay, author and main idea
  • Present Major Details from the article
  • Conclues with a personal thesis.
  • -Present Personal Experience
  • -Explain why the evidence makes you feel that way or why your personal experience relates to main idea
  • -Present Textual Evidence


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