Student research funding and travel support lets you pad your cv by listing awards



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  • - lets you pad your CV by listing awards
  • - fund your own research
  • - attend conferences:
  • - present your research, improve communication skills
  • - meet potential future advisors, reviewers, collaborators
  • - learn about what’s current in your field
  • - get support for attending summer courses, doing summer
  • internships, collecting data off campus, etc
  • Check out:
  • http://www.calstatela.edu/academic/aa/gsr/ssp.php
  • Research Support - CSULA
  • The Office of Graduate Studies and Research accepts
  • applications for the Fund to Support Graduate Students
  • in Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activities (RSCA)
  • in May of the academic year, for up to $750:
  • www.calstatela.edu/academic/aa/gsr/assets/forms/RSCA-description.pdf
  • Applicants must provide (1) an abstract (200 word limit)
  • summarizing the focus of thesis or culminating project,
  • (2) a budget narrative (approximately 300 words) explaining
  • use of and need for requested funds, and (3) a budget request
  • indicating estimated cost of supplies, equipment, & services.
  • You may fill out the form online, print + submit a typed copy.  
  • Office of Graduate Studies and Research website:
  • http://www.calstatela.edu/academic/aa/gsr/ssp.php  
  • Travel Support - CSULA
  • The Office of Graduate Studies and Research accepts rolling
  • applications for to support conference attendance (TSSP):
  • www.calstatela.edu/academic/aa/gsr/assets/forms/travelsupport-description.pdf
  • Applicants must already have an abstract accepted for a
  • presentation to apply for travel funds, which are not guaranteed 
  • Sally Cassanova Fellowships
  • CSU pre-doctoral program provides up to $3,000 for:
  • - summer research internship program at a doctoral-granting
  • institution, to receive exposure to research in a chosen field
  • - visits to doctoral-granting institutions to explore opportunities
  • for doctoral study
  • - travel to a national symposium or professional meeting
  • in a student’s chosen field
  • - membership in professional organizations, journal subscriptions
  • - graduate school application and test fees
  • Application due late Feb
  • www.calstatela.edu/academic/aa/gsr/assets/forms/predoc-announcement.pdf
  • CSUPERB student travel funds
  • (CSU program in education and research in biotechnology)
  • http://www.calstate.edu/csuperb/grants/student-travel-program/
  • Proposal Due Date: October 12, 2015
  • Award Notification: December Maximum Award Amount: $1,500
  • Program Description
  • CSUPERB Student Travel Grant Program supports CSU student
  • travel to biotechnology-related professional meetings or to collect
  • biotechnology-related research data at specialized shared facilities.
  •  grants support travel over a 12 month window
  • CSUPERB plans to issue another RFP in spring 2016 !!
  • (RFP = request for proposals; the official announcement)
  • CSUPERB faculty-student collaborative research
  • (CSU program in education and research in biotechnology)
  • http://www.calstate.edu/csuperb/grants/student-travel-program/
  • Proposal Due Date: February 1, 2016
  • Award Notification: May, 2016 Maximum Award Amount: $15,000
  • Program Description
  • Two programs provide support for (1) new faculty who have not
  • had a major research grant, or (2) established faculty needing to
  • fill gaps in funding for ongoing projects or pilot new, unfunded
  • research directions
  •  provides some salary for the student(s) involved, and research
  • funds for the project
  • COAST summer research funds
  • (Council on ocean affairs, science and technology)
  • http://www.calstate.edu/coast/funding/internal_funding.shtml
  • Proposals for research awards due in October
  • Award Amount: $3,000
  • Program Description
  • Awards made to CSU students working with COAST faculty
  • members on marine and coastal related research projects.
  • Proposals for student travel now open
  • External student travel funds
  • Meetings are sponsored by one or more professional societies
  • Often, that society will have funds for students to attend meetings
  • that you can find on their website and apply for
  • - may require working a desk at the meeting
  • Many small grants are also available for research travel costs
  • through professional societies in a given field
  • Choosing a Meeting
  • Important things to consider:
  • - scope of conference
  • - size
  • - location: costs of travel
  • - when meeting is held (during classes or summer?)
  • - cost of student registration
  • - abstract required?
  • - abstract due dates (may be 6 months in advance)
  • - reputation for being “student-friendly” or not?
  • - who else is attending
  • - special symposia of interest to you
  • - should you give a poster or a talk?
  • Attending a Meeting
  • My suggestions:
  • 1) scan abstracts ahead of time, to know what talks you might be
  • interested in attending – or what talks someone you’d like to
  • meet would probably be attending
  • 2) don’t miss the deadline to book into the hotel!
  • 3) take notes on all talks you attend. It makes you pay attention
  • and guarantees the most bang for your time
  • 4) Know who you are there to meet, and make it happen. Let
  • other people know who you are hoping to meet; faculty know
  • each other and can arrange introductions.
  • Attending a Meeting
  • My suggestions:
  • 5) decide whether you are going to attend one symposium or
  • jump between talks, and figure out where rooms are in
  • advance so you don’t have to rush
  • 6) don’t get drunk and skip the morning talks
  • 7) don’t get drunk and embarrass your advisor
  • 8) do drink strategically if it’s a chance to get to know a potential
  • collaborator or advisor, but within reasonable limits
  • 9) follow up with key people you met
  • Contacting a prospective advisor
  • Faculty (or employers) are extremely busy people who will only
  • a) read short, concise emails or CVs
  • b) take you seriously if you appear to know what you’re doing
  • An initial email to a prospective advisor should precede your
  • application to a Ph.D. program by several months
  • Also, do your research ahead of time: Does the school you are
  • applying to offer any fellowships for which you are qualified?
  • Contacting a prospective advisor
  • An email to a prospective advisor should contain:
  • 1) your name, status (“2nd yr MS student at CSULA”), and that
  • you are inquiring if Dr. X is taking new students in Fall 2017
  • 2) 1-2 sentences summarizing your research experience
  • - don’t use highly specific jargon or names; all marine
  • scientists don’t know what cypriniid ostracods are
  • - it’s not what you have done that matters, it’s showing
  • that you know how to communicate what you’ve
  • done, and how to write about science
  • Contacting a prospective advisor
  • An email to a prospective advisor should contain:
  • 1) your name, status (“2nd yr MS student at CSULA”), and that
  • you are inquiring if Dr. X is taking new students in Fall 2013
  • 2) 1-2 sentences summarizing your research experience
  • 3) statement of what you are interested in studying for a PhD,
  • and why this program + lab are a good fit for your interests
  • - don’t waste time telling someone their research is really
  • interesting, they know that already
  • - a PhD is all about developing your own ideas, so you
  • need to demonstrate that you know this and have some
  • idea what topic or question you’d like to spend 5 yr on
  • Contacting a prospective advisor
  • An email to a prospective advisor should contain:
  • 1) your name, status (“2nd yr MS student at CSULA”), and that
  • you are inquiring if Dr. X is taking new students in Fall 2013
  • 2) 1-2 sentences summarizing your research experience
  • 3) statement of what you are interested in studying for a PhD,
  • and why this program + lab are a good fit for your interests
  • 4) mention any relevant technical skills you have
  • - statistical analyses or modelling you have done
  • - scientific SCUBA dive certified
  • - made a transgenic rat
  • - performed ELISA, western blots, and isolated mRNA
  • Contacting a prospective advisor
  • An email to a prospective advisor should contain:
  • 1) your name, status (“2nd yr MS student at CSULA”), and that
  • you are inquiring if Dr. X is taking new students in Fall 2013
  • 2) 1-2 sentences summarizing your research experience
  • 3) statement of what you are interested in studying for a PhD,
  • and why this program + lab are a good fit for your interests
  • 4) mention any relevant technical skills you have
  • 5) list classes you have taken relevant to the research topic,
  • esp. if they had lab or field components
  • 6) state any conference presentations you have given, and
  • attach an abstract from one talk or poster to the email
  • Contacting a prospective advisor
  • An email to a prospective advisor should contain:
  • 1) your name, status (“2nd yr MS student at CSULA”)
  • 2) 1-2 sentences summarizing your research experience
  • 3) statement of what you are interested in studying for a PhD,
  • and why this program + lab are a good fit for your interests
  • 4) mention any relevant technical skills you have
  • 5) list classes you have taken relevant to the research topic,
  • esp. if they had lab or field components
  • 6) state any conference presentations you have given, and
  • attach an abstract from one talk or poster to the email
  • 7) state that you will be applying for any appropriate fellowships
  • 8) attach a current CV
  • Personal Statement, or Statement of Purpose
  • Many kinds of applications require a statement of purpose, or
  • personal statement
  • ALL students mis-understand this opportunity, and tell (a) their
  • personal journey from birth to present-day wafting aspirations,
  • and (b) massively over-write the essay
  • (a) despite the title of this piece of writing, NO ONE CARES
  • ABOUT YOUR JOURNEY.
  • - a few sentences of personal information to contextualize
  • your decisions and interests is appropriate
  • - what this REALLY is, is a test of whether you can concisely
  • and clearly describe your research experience to date
  • Personal Statement, or Statement of Purpose
  • Many kinds of applications require a statement of purpose, or
  • personal statement
  • ALL students mis-understand this opportunity, and:
  • (a) use most of the space to tell their personal journey from
  • birth to present-day wafting aspirations “.. and that’s why I
  • want to cure cancer..”
  • and
  • (b) massively over-write the essay, using excessively flowery
  • language and hyper-dramatic wording
  • Personal Statement, or Statement of Purpose
  • (a) despite the title of this piece of writing, NO ONE CARES
  • ABOUT YOUR JOURNEY.
  • - a few sentences of personal information to contextualize
  • your decisions and interests is appropriate
  • - this REALLY is a test of whether you can concisely and
  • clearly describe your research experience to date
  • - what is the relevant background to your project(s);
  • why did you undertake this study in the first place?
  • - what were the hypotheses you tested?
  • - what methods did you use, what data did you collect, and
  • how did the analyses of those data let you test hypotheses?
  • Personal Statement, or Statement of Purpose
  • (a) despite the title of this piece of writing, NO ONE CARES
  • ABOUT YOUR JOURNEY.
  • - a few sentences of personal information to contextualize
  • your decisions and interests is appropriate
  • - this REALLY is a test of whether you can concisely and
  • clearly describe your research experience to date
  • - finally, your goals should be both practical, and clearly
  • articulated: why will THIS job / internship / lab / field class
  • better prepare you for your long-term goals?
  • “I hope to help mankind better use the environment in ways
  • that will sustain the human endeavor for millenia” is not a
  • clear or practical goal
  • Personal Statement, or Statement of Purpose
  • (b) do NOT massively over-write the essay, using excessively
  • flowery language and hyper-dramatic wording
  • Everyone does this; don’t do this. Write in clear, well-constructed
  • paragraphs. Know what your main points to get across to the
  • reader are.
  • Everyone has hopes and dreams. Merely articulating yours in
  • no way sets you apart from the crowd. Think about how your
  • experience as a young scientist may be unique
  • - this essay presents an opportunity to show that you can
  • convey science through good writing to a non-expert. It’s really
  • a writing test, not a Facebook post about your life story
  • Keeping a lab notebook
  • - ask your advisor what style of notebook he/she prefers
  • - date every entry
  • - write down EVERYTHING, whether it seems relevant or not
  • - trouble-shooting problems is only as easy as you make it
  • - easier to write it down now, than to try to remember 5 years
  • from now what exactly you did
  • - do NOT write things on stray pieces of paper; if you do, these
  • need to get taped permanently into the notebook
  • - print-outs can be inserted or attached to the notebook
  • Keeping a lab notebook
  • - avoid using “template” sheets if this means you get lazy, and
  • don’t make separate annotations of what you’re doing
  • - put an index of major experiments in the front, so later students
  • and your advisor can easily find entries after you are gone
  • - your notebook belongs to your lab; it doesn’t leave with you.
  • Keep it updated, organized, and clear so that anyone who
  • comes after can use it to figure out exactly what you did
  • - patent lawsuits, scientific fraud and misconduct hearings come
  • down to lab notebooks, which are incredibly serious big deals
  • - open e-notebooks: what do you think?
  • Research Ethics
  • Scientific ethical conduct and ethical implications
  • of scientific issues in society are important.


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