Student Number English (Advanced) and English (Standard)



Download 494,83 Kb.
Page2/5
Date conversion27.04.2018
Size494,83 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5
English (Advanced) and English (Standard)
Paper One



General Instructions

  • Reading time – 




  • Working time – 




  • Write using blue or black pen




  • Answer each section in a SEPARATE writing booklet.




  • Use your student number only.



Total marks – 45
Section I

15 marks



Section II

15 marks

  • Allow about 40 minutes for this section



Section III

15 marks

  • Allow about 40 minutes for this section



Section I
15 marks

Attempt Question 1

Allow about 40 minutes for this section
Answer the question in a writing booklet. Extra writing booklets are available.

___________________________________________________________________

In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:


  • demonstrate understanding of the way perceptions of discovery are shaped in and through texts

  • describe, explain and analyse the relationship between language, text and context

Question 1 (15 marks)

Examine Text one, two and three carefully and then answer the questions on page 11.



Text one – Blog

I never read too much as a child, other than series that I was religiously devoted to (Lemony Snicket, Harry Potter), and books I had to read for school (The Great Gatsby, The Leopard, Anna Karenina etc etc). I enjoyed what I read immensely, but didn’t stray much beyond them until I finished school. I then went on a binge of wonderful books – including The Picture of Dorian Gray, Lolita, The Beach, and my all-time favourite, Donna Tartt’s The Secret History – as well as a series of philosophy books that spurred me towards my degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics.




It was then that my love for books met a long hiatus.


By loading us up with (sorry to the academics reading this) frightfully long, and more often than not mentally exhausting articles, papers and text books, the art of reading for pleasure ground to a halt. If I did pick up a book for pleasure, I then was hit by the guilt “well if I am reading, I might as well be reading for my lecture/tutorial/essay/exam/dissertation” – and so the cycle continued for 3 years. The ultimate deterrent to reading is duty. I’m almost certain that if I read even half of the literature at university and didn’t have to be tested on it, I would’ve enjoyed it infinitely more. But such is our education system.
1   2   3   4   5


The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2016
send message

    Main page