School Year 2000--2001



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Common Reading Task for 4th Grade

Arkansas Alternate Portfolio Assessment

Limited English Proficient

School Year 2000--2001


WHAT MAKES A GOOD PET?
There are all kinds of pets for all kinds of kids: city kids, country kids, younger kids, older kids. But which pet would be a good pet for you? Which one should you pick?

A good first step would be to talk it over with your parents. They can help you figure out how much money you might need to spend on your pet. Goldfish, for example, are cheap and easy to keep. But many tropical fish need special food and equipment.

Another thing to figure out is how much of your time your pet will need. You must make a real commitment to take care of your own pet!

You might also find that furry animals make you or someone else in your family sneeze and cough. A bird might work out better for you.

Give some thought to where and how you live before deciding on a pet. It would be tough to keep a pony in an apartment, for example. But a few gerbils or mice might be OK.

And be sure to think about what you want from your pet. Do you want a dog you can cuddle and play with? Or would you rather study and learn from stay-put pets, such as fascinating insects?

One really important thing to remember is that there are some animals that you should never pick as pets: wild baby birds, raccoons, foxes, skunks, squirrels, opossums, deer, and many more.

These animals should not be taken from the wild or even touched. It can be against the law to keep them, and they may carry deadly diseases. Even if you find them for sale in a store, do not choose them.

These cute wild babies may also get nasty when they get older. And if you try to let them go in the wild after they’ve grown up, they’re almost sure to die. The rule to remember about almost any animal is “If wild and free, let it be!”

To help you decide what might make a good pet, we’ve put together a pet checklist. We’ve named a lot of the animals that are often kept as pets. We’ve shown some good points and bad points about each. And we’ve told you which are OK and not OK to keep. Which pet is for you?


OPEN-RESPONSE ITEM


Pretend your parents have said they will consider letting you have a pet.

Choose a pet that is best suited to you based on the information in the checklist. Tell how you will convince your parents to let you keep the pet that you have chosen. Use information from the article and checklist to support your answer.


PICK-PET-CHECKLIST

PET


GOOD POINTS

BAD POINTS

OK TO KEEP

Guinea


Pig

  • Active during the day

  • Rarely bite or scratch

  • Affectionate

  • Can be very messy

  • Very sensitive to dampness






YES

Domestic

Rabbits


  • Easy to tame

  • Enjoy being petted

  • Good to cuddle



YES


Sheep

Goats


  • Interesting to watch

  • Can be exhibited

  • Wool and milk can be used

  • Against the law to keep in many places

  • Need shelter, pasture, fencing



YES


Mules

Horses


Ponies

Burros


  • Can be ridden, driven, used for work

  • Affectionate

  • Good exercise for owner

  • Beautiful to watch

  • Can be exhibited

  • Can be costly to keep

  • Can kick, bite, or throw you

  • Need shelter, pasture, fencing

  • Need lots of care and training

  • Can be smelly and messy



YES


Raccoons

Other wild

Mammals


  • Against the law to keep in many states

  • Can carry deadly diseases

  • Can get mean when older



NO


Cats

  • Small size

  • Easy to feed and care for

  • Can live indoors or outdoors

  • Fun to hold and cuddle

  • Very affectionate

  • Need little daily care

  • Easy to find vet care for

  • May scratch furniture or rugs

  • Litter pans can be messy

  • May kill birds or small mammals

  • May get insect pests

  • May scratch or bite

  • May make you sneeze



YES




Dogs

  • Come in many sizes

  • Can live indoors or outdoors

  • Fun to love and play with

  • Very affectionate

  • Can give protection

  • Easy to find vet care for

  • Can be smelly, messy, noisy

  • May get insect pests

  • Need to be licensed and trained

  • May make you sneeze

  • May bite if annoyed

  • Need lots of attention



YES

This material was adapted from “Grade 4 Benchmark Examination (Pilot) Released Item Booklet, February 1998 Administration.” For more information to help with this problem, use the other questions and diagrams from the booklet.


Common Task Writing Prompt for 4th Grade

Arkansas Alternate Portfolio Assessment

Limited English Proficient Students

School Year 2000--2001
One day at school, your teacher comes into the classroom, places a box on the floor and leaves the room. Suddenly the box begins to move.

Write a story about what happens next. Be sure to give enough detail so that the person reading your paper will understand.



WRITER’S CHECKLIST





  1. Look at the ideas in your response.




  • Have you focused on one main idea?

  • Have you used enough details to explain yourself?

  • Have you put your thoughts in order?

  • Can others understand what you are saying?




  1. Think about what you want

others to know and feel about reading your paper.


  • Will others understand how you think or feel about an idea?

  • Will others feel angry, sad, happy, surprised, or some other way about your response? (Hint: Make your reader feel like you do about your paper’s subject.)

  • Do you have sentences of different lengths? (Hint: Be sure you have variety in sentence lengths.)




  • Are your sentences alike? (Hint: Use different kinds of sentences.)




  1. Look at the words you have used.




  • Have you described things, places, and people the way they are? (Hint: Use enough details.)

  • Are you the same person all the way through your paper? (Hint: Check your verbs and pronouns.)

  • Have you used the right words in the right places?




  1. Look at your handwriting.




  • Can others read your handwriting with no trouble?











This was adapted from the “Grade 4 Benchmark Examination (Pilot) Released Item Booklet February 1998 Administration.”




Common Mathematics Task for 4th Grade
Arkansas Alternate Portfolio Assessment

Limited English Proficient

School Year 2000-2001




The patterns below are made from stacks of blocks. For EACH pattern, tell how many blocks will be in the stack of blocks that comes NEXT in the pattern. BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR ANSWERS (a), (b), (c) and (d)


a.


b.

c.


d.

This item was adapted from the “Grade 4 Benchmark Examination (Pilot) Released Item Booklet.” For more information, check in the Item Booklet.


Common Task Reading for 6th Grade

Arkansas Alternate Portfolio Assessment


Limited English Proficient Students

School Year 2000—2001
Remembering things is probably a challenge for most students at times. Read the following article for some tips on how to remember.

HOW TO REMEMBER


Do you have trouble remembering to do your homework or remembering what homework you are supposed to do? Worse, do you study and then find out the next day you can’t even remember what you studied?
ARE YOU KIDDING? I FORGET MY HOMEWORK NEARLY EVERY DAY. I SOMETIMES FORGET THINGS I REALLY WANT TO REMEMBER. CAN I DO ANYTHING ABOUT THAT?
Memory is a complex process. Even scientists don’t know exactly how it works. We have some control over what we remember, but we don’t control it entirely. People differ on how easily they remember different things. Remembering is also a skill, and all of us can improve memory by practicing and by knowing more about the conditions under which we are more likely to remember things.
LIKE WHAT KIND OF CONDITIONS?


  • You tend to remember things that are personally important. You might forget to buy thumbtacks if your dad asked you to get them for his office, but




you would probably remember to buy

them if he told you he was going to use

them to hang up a model you made.


  • You tend to remember the first and last items on a list. If your aunt asked you to go to the store for eggs, milk, potatoes, oranges, sugar, and salt, you are more likely to remember the eggs and salt because they are first and last.

  • You tend to remember something if it is associated with something you already know. Suppose you met a boy named Frank Wilson, who told you that his sister is Shirley Wilson in your class. You know Shirley pretty well, so you will probably remember Frank’s name.

  • You tend to remember things that are repeated. TV ads take advantage of this. The station will play a commercial over and over until you are sick of it, but you will remember the product.

  • You tend to remember things that are unusual. Many rock stars dress in unusual outfits so you won’t forget them.

  • You tend to remember things that occur in a pattern. You would have little trouble remembering a locker combination that was 31-3-13.

READING OPEN-RESPONSE ITEM

Passage: How to Remember


What is your basic learning style? Identify that style. Give examples of your behavior that are part of that learning style and explain how the suggestions in this article could work for you.

This item was adapted from “Middle Level Benchmark Examination (Pilot) – Grade 8 Released Item Booklet.” February 1999 Administration.



Common Task Writing Prompt for 6th Grade

Arkansas Alternate Portfolio Assessment

Limited English Proficient Students

School Year 2000--2001
Your local newspaper is having an essay contest, and you decide to enter. The topic you must write about is

If you could plan a perfect day for yourself, what would that day be like?

Before you begin to write, think about what would make a day perfect for you. What would happen during this perfect day? Think about how you would spend the day. Now write an essay about your perfect day. Give specific details and describe the day clearly so that your readers will understand why it is perfect for you.



WRITER’S CHECKLIST





  1. Look at the ideas in your response.




  • Have you focused on one main idea?

  • Have you used enough details to explain yourself?

  • Have you put your thoughts in order?

  • Can others understand what you are saying?




  1. Think about what you want

others to know and feel about reading your paper.


  • Will others understand how you think or feel about an idea?

  • Will others feel angry, sad, happy, surprised, or some other way about your response? (Hint: Make your reader feel like you do about your paper’s subject.)

  • Do you have sentences of different lengths? (Hint: Be sure you have variety in sentence lengths.)




  • Are your sentences alike? (Hint: Use different kinds of sentences.)




  1. Look at the words you have used.




  • Have you described things, places, and people the way they are? (Hint: Use enough details.)

  • Are you the same person all the way through your paper? (Hint: Check your verbs and pronouns.)

  • Have you used the right words in the right places?




  1. Look at your handwriting.




  • Can others read your handwriting with no trouble?











This was adapted from the “Middle Level Benchmark Examination (Pilot) – Grade 8 Released Item Booklet,” February 1999 Administration.


Common Mathematics Task for 6th Grade

Arkansas Alternate Portfolio Assessment

Limited English Proficient

School Year 2000-2001


Susan has a package to wrap that has the dimensions shown below. The knot and bow require 14 inches of ribbon and the package is tied with ribbon all the way around, as shown.




7 in
11 in.

15 in
How much ribbon is needed? Explain your reasoning.

This problem was adapted from “Middle Level Benchmark Examination (Pilot) – Grade 8 Released Item Booklet.” For more information, use the released item booklet.



Common Task Reading for 8th Grade

Arkansas Alternate Portfolio Assessment

Limited English Proficient Students

School Year 2000—2001




Walking Tour of Downtown Little Rock


You’ll begin your tour across the street from the Statehouse Convention Center at the restored Capital Hotel (#1), which was built in 1873 as a business block but converted to hotel use in 1877. On a visit to Little Rock in 1880, President Ulysses S. Grant was a guest here. Note its four-story cast-iron front, and go in to see the lobby, an elegant 1908 interior by Little Rock architect, George R. Mann.

In the next block west on Markham Street is the Old State House (#2), which was under construction from 1833 to 1842.

The middle portion was completed in time to house the first state legislative assembly in 1836 when Arkansas became the 25th state. Designed in Greek Revival style by Kentucky architect, Gideon Shyrock, the Old State House served as the seat of the state government until the early 20th century. More recently, it was the site where President Clinton announced his bid for the U.S. Presidency and celebrated his election night victory, November 3, 1992. As a museum of Arkansas history, the Old State House is well worth a visit.

The large building at the end of the block west of the Old State House is Joseph Taylor Robinson Memorial Auditorium (#3), built during the Depression under the auspices of the Public Works Administration and named for Joe T. Robinson, U.S. Senator from Arkansas from 1913 until his death in 1937. Until Bill Clinton’s candidacy, Senator Robinson was the only Arkansan to have appeared on a Presidential ticket, running (unsuccessfully) for Vice-President as a Democrat in 1928. Robinson Auditorium is the home of the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra, Ballet Arkansas, and Broadway plays. It served as the site for the December 1992 Clinton-Gore Economic Conference, which was attended by several hundred top leaders of U.S. industries.




  1. Capital Hotel, 111 W. Markham

  2. Old State House, 30 W. Markham

  3. Joe T. Robinson Auditorium, NE Corner Markham and Broadway

READING OPEN-RESPONSE WALKING TOUR OF LITTLE ROCK


Using the information in the reading passage above, describe the present and past uses of the Little Rock buildings, that are listed, by local and state governments.

Reading passage was adapted from the “Grade 8 Benchmark Examination Released Item Booklet, April 2000 Administration.” Use the booklet to find more information that can be used with this item.


Common Mathematics Task for 8th Grade

Arkansas Alternate Portfolio Assessment

Limited English Proficient

School Year 2000-2001


Use the diagram below and your centimeter ruler to answer the following question.



WIDTH

LENGTH


6 m

8 m


½ cm = 1 m
Use the rectangle above, increase its length by 50% and decrease its width by 50%.

  1. What are the length and width of the new rectangle?

  2. Draw and label the new rectangle to scale, using the same scale used to make the diagram above.

  3. Did this change the area of the rectangle? If so, by what percent?

BE SURE TO LABEL YOUR RESPONSES (a), (b), AND (c)

This problem was adapted from “Middle Level (Grade 8) Benchmark Examination Released Item Booklet” April 2000 Administration.


Common Task Writing Prompt for 8th Grade

Arkansas Alternate Portfolio Assessment


Limited English Proficient Students

School Year 2000--2001
Your school newspaper is asking students to write an article about the following topic.

What is the nicest thing a classmate has ever done for you?

Before you begin to write, think about something nice a classmate has done for you. What did that person do? How did it help you and how did it make you feel? Now write an article for your school newspaper about the nicest thing a classmate has ever done for you. Give specific detail and examples. Be sure to present your ideas clearly so that your readers will understand.



WRITER’S CHECKLIST


  1. Look at the ideas in your response.




  • Have you focused on one main idea?

  • Have you used enough details to explain yourself?

  • Have you put your thoughts in order?

  • Can others understand what you are saying?




  1. Think about what you want

others to know and feel about

reading your paper.




  • Will others understand how you think or feel about an idea?

  • Will others feel angry, sad, happy, surprised, or some other way about your response? (Hint: Make your reader feel like you do about your paper’s subject.)

  • Do you have sentences of different lengths? (Hint: Be sure you have variety in sentence lengths.)




  • Are your sentences alike? (Hint: Use different kinds of sentences.)




  1. Look at the words you have used.




  • Have you described things, places, and people the way they are? (Hint: Use enough details.)

  • Are you the same person all the way through your paper? (Hint: Check your verbs and pronouns.)

  • Have you used the right words in the right places?




  1. Look at your handwriting.




  • Can others read your handwriting with no trouble?











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