School of engineering science



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SECTION 2A

PROGRAM INFORMATION


2A.1 PROGRAM NAME: Engineering Science


  1. CALENDAR:

Engineering Science




  1. DIPLOMA:

Bachelor of Applied Science in Engineering Science




  1. TRANSCRIPT:

Batchelor of Applied Science in Engineering Science


Faculty of Applied Science

Bachelor of Applied Science

Program in Engineering Science

Concentration in Electronics, Computer Engineering, Systems Option, Engineering Physics, or Biomedical Engineering




  1. OPTIONS:

Biomedical Engineering

Electronics Engineering

Computer Engineering

Engineering Physics (Electronics)

Systems


Minor in Computer and Electronics Design


  1. MODES:

BASc


BASc (Honors)
2A.2 ADMINISTRATOR RESPONSIBLE FOR THE PROGRAM:
Mehrdad Saif, PhD, MSEE, BSEE, PEng

Director, School of Engineering Science

Simon Fraser University

8888 University Drive

Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6

Telephone: 604-291-3119

Fax: 604-291-4951

Email: saif@ensc.sfu.ca


2A.3 ADMINISTRATION OF THE PROGRAM:
Engineering Science at SFU is organized as one of six schools, equivalent to departments, within the Faculty of Applied Science. The other Schools are Interactive Arts and Technology, Computing Science, Kinesiology, Communication, and Resources and Environmental Management. The Dean of the Faculty is not necessarily an engineer. Consequently, many of the issues normally handled by a Faculty of Engineering, such as relations with the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of BC and accreditation, are instead dealt with at the School level, usually by its Director.
Allocation of continuing faculty positions requires approval of the Dean, the Vice‑President, Academic, and, finally, the Board of Governors. Authority for allocation of continuing staff positions rests with the Director, Dean or Vice‑President, Academic, depending on which level of budget is being used to create the position. Limited term appointments are concluded by the Director in the case of staff, or the Dean, in the case of faculty. Normally, requests for such positions originate with the Director in consultation with senior members of the School.
After allocation of an open faculty position, the Director appoints and chairs a search committee. The committee’s recommendation requires ratification by the faculty and approval of the Dean and the Vice-President, Academic.
The Director has the authority and responsibility to assign teaching workload in consultation with faculty members, within the constraints of university-wide guidelines for equity. Similarly, the Director has the authority and responsibility to assign workload to staff, while adhering to the unionized job classification structure; in practice, most of this work assignment is delegated to senior staff members in the areas of the laboratories, the general office and the internship office.
Tenure, promotion and salary recommendations are prepared by the seven-member Engineering Science Tenure and Promotion Committee (TPC), chaired by the Director, which are then reviewed by the Dean, who can make a separate recommendation. The Dean then forwards positive recommendations to the Vice‑President, Academic, and all other recommendations (negative or where TPC and the Dean differ) to the Faculty Review Committee. The final recommendation is from the President to the Board of Governors.
Allocation of the School’s operating and teaching assistant budgets is made by the Dean. Once allocated, expenditures against the budget are approved by the Director, who can make reallocations among the budget items as required.
Development of School policy and strategy is conducted within the context of the “committee of the whole” (the set of all Engineering Science faculty members), usually at monthly meetings and at periodic School retreats. Initiative in these developments is most commonly taken by the Director or, less frequently, by the chairs of the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee and the Graduate Program Committee.
2A.4 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES:
The program's goal is to produce well-educated, innovative engineer/scientists who have entrepreneurial skills and attitudes and who are oriented to new technologies. Entry into this demanding program is on a competitive basis.
To achieve the aforementioned objectives, the curriculum is designed in such a way that it consists of a good mixture of courses in pure, applied and engineering sciences that emphasizes learning, conceptualization, design and analysis. Specialization is possible by choosing one of the five available options: Biomedical Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electronics Engineering, Engineering Physics, and System Engineering. Classroom learning is reinforced with laboratory work and industrial internship. Also built into the program are courses on the social impacts of technology, finance, management, design methods and entrepreneurship intended to complement scientific studies. Special, integrated communications courses taken throughout the program ensures that all graduates have the communication skills necessary to be effective engineers.
The curriculum is monitored by the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee (UCC) and adjustments are made from time to time to ensure continued relevance of the program objectives. On average, the UCC meets once a month for approximately two hours. Students’ feedback on curriculum issues is conveyed to the UCC by their representative, who is a voting member of the committee.
Students may choose either the general BASc program or the BASc (Honors) program. The BASc (Honors) program requires a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and an upper division grade point average (UDGPA) of at least 3.0. The general BASc program requires a CGPA and UDGPA each of at least 2.4. If the CGPA of a student is below 2.40 at the time of the annual progress review, the student will be required to withdraw from the School.
Besides higher GPA requirements, honors students are required to complete an additional 12-credit undergraduate thesis (ENSC 498, 499). The thesis offers a unique opportunity for undergraduate students to gain some research experience. Each thesis student is supervised by a committee of three faculty members, at least one of which is required to be a P.Eng. Both the general and honors students are required to take a Capstone project course (ENSC 440)1.
The general BASc program may be completed in four years, which includes eight academic semesters. A BASc (honors) typically requires an additional two semesters for thesis completion.
2A.5 CURRICULUM CONTROL:
Proposals for curriculum changes are initiated by faculty members in the School of Engineering Sciences (ENSC). They are then submitted to the School’s Undergraduate Curriculum Committee (UCC) for consideration. The UCC is chaired by a senior faculty member who is a P.Eng and the majority of its members are also registered Professional Engineers. Normally, the UCC is composed of at least one representative from each of the five undergraduate options, plus a student representative who is also a voting member.
Proposals are debated and discussed at the UCC, which may receive input from the departments of Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry, and the schools of Computing Science and Kinesiology. Decisions are made based on simple majority.
The UCC recommendations are then put forward for approval to the Engineering Science faculty, chaired by the Director. The School’s Director is always a P.Eng. In addition, many of the ENSC faculty members are registered Professional Engineers.
Changes then proceed to the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee of the Faculty of Applied Sciences (FAS-UCC) chaired by the Associate Dean (which, by agreement, acts only in a coordinating role). The next step in the process is the Senate Committee on Undergraduate Studies (SCUS), which puts forward the formal proposals to the Senate Committee on Academic Planning (SCAP). Only changes of a far-reaching nature are considered in detail by SCAP. Finally, Senate must give final approval for any changes to come into effect. Final budget authority rests with the Board of Governors.
2A.6 STUDENT CURRICULUM COUNSELLING:
The first step when advising and counseling students regarding course selection for the technical elective portion of the program is to consult the University Calendar (pages 131-134, 376-381of the 2005/2006 Calendar) and the approved list of courses from which students may make their selection. These lists are available at the Engineering Science Undergraduate Curriculum Committee web site. Students interested in taking a course that does not appear on these lists must contact the Chair of the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee and obtain his/her approval in writing before proceeding with the course. This approval is only granted provided the proposed course meets the accreditation requirements and is otherwise acceptable.
The School encourages students to choose their electives so that they complement each other. Taking the appropriate prerequisites can open up many interesting courses.

Technical Electives
Students in the Electronics Engineering option pursuing an Honors degree are required to take one Technical Elective. A list of pre-approved Technical Electives is provided in Appendix A.


Science Electives

In order to ensure compliance with the Accreditation Rules, all Science Elective choices are subject to approval by the Chair of the School's Undergraduate Curriculum Committee (UCC); however, in order to simplify this process and to clarify by example, the list in Appendix B has been pre-approved followed by a list of courses that are un-acceptable as Science Electives.


Note that pre-approved science elective courses may require prerequisites, which can be fulfilled by another science elective. Also, in some cases, permission of the department in question must be obtained prior to registration.
Engineering Science Electives
Students are required to take a number of Engineering Science elective courses. Any 4-credit 400 level ENSC course which is not listed as one of the mandatory courses in the student’s option is eligible in this category. Furthermore, with the permission of the undergraduate curriculum committee chair, students may replace one of their Engineering Science electives by either a Directed Studies or Special Project Laboratory course. Special Topic courses that have been approved by the undergraduate curriculum committee chair and the director may be counted here.
2A.7 COMPLEMENTARY STUDIES:
Pre-Approved Complementary Studies Electives
Depending upon their chosen option, Engineering Science students are required to complete 6 credits (2 courses) of “Complementary Studies” in addition to the series of Communication Program Courses (ENSC 101, 102, 304, 305, 406), ENSC 100 – Engineering Technology and Society, ECON 103 – Principles of Microeconomics2, and ENSC 201 – The Business of Engineering. These non-technical courses are intended to broaden the students’ education and must include at least one course (3 credits) dealing with the central issues, methodologies and thought processes of the humanities and social sciences.
In order to ensure compliance with the Accreditation Rules, all Complementary Studies choices are subject to approval by the Chair of the School’s Undergraduate Curriculum Committee (UCC); however, in order to simplify this process and to clarify by example, the list in Appendix C has been pre-approved. Note that these courses may require prerequisites, which can be fulfilled by another Complementary Studies Elective. Also, in some cases, permission of the department in question must be obtained prior to registration.
The school encourages students to choose their electives so that they complement each other. Taking the appropriate prerequisites can open up many interesting courses. Appendix C summarizes the courses that are unacceptable for Complementary Studies Electives.
2A.8 EXPOSURE TO FACULTY AND STUDENTS FROM NON-ENGINEERING AREAS:
For historical and pedagogical reasons, a significant number of courses in the Engineering Science program are provided by other departments and taught by faculty members in those departments. In such courses, engineering students meet and work with students from across the university. They also learn material taught from the perspective of a non-engineering instructor. A summary of the courses taught by these faculty members is presented in the table below.
In addition, engineering students work with other students in some Engineering Science courses. For example, ENSC 100-3, Engineering Technology and Society, is open to all students in the university. A feature of the course is the project, where student teams often have non-engineering members. See http://www.ensc.sfu.ca/people/faculty/jones/ ENSC100/. Another example is ENSC 201-3, The Business of Engineering, where engineering students and business students from BUS 477-4, New Venture Planning, work together to develop a business plan (www.sfu.ca/~mvolker/ensc201/bpcomp.htm).

Table 1: Mandatory Courses from Other Departments (based on 2005/2006 Calendar)



Engineering Science Common Core

Semester One
total credit hours 17

Semester Two
total credit hours 17

Semester Three
total credit hours 18

Semester Four
total credit hours 17

CHEM 121-4 General Chemistry and Laboratory I

CMPT 128-3 Introduction to Computer Science and Programming for Engineers

ECON 103-3 Principles of Microeconomics

(C,E,P,S)



Cmpl I-3 first complementary elective (P,S)

MATH 151-3
Calculus I

MATH 152-3
Calculus II

CMPT 225-3 Data Structures and Programming (B)

CMPT 225-3
Data Structures and Programming (C,S)

PHYS 120-3
Modern Physics and Mechanics

MATH 232-3 Elementary Linear Algebra

MACM 101-3
Discrete Mathematics I (C,S)

KIN 208-3 Introduction to Physiological Systems (B)




PHYS 121-3 Optics, Electricity and Magnetism

MATH 232-3 Elementary Linear Algebra

MATH 254-3 Vector and Complex Analysis (B,E,P)




PHYS 131-2 General Physics Laboratory B

MATH 251-3 Calculus III

PHYS 221-3 Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism (P,E,S)







MATH 310-3 Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations

STAT 270-3 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (C,P,S)







PHYS 211-3 Intermediate Mechanics (P)










STAT 270-3 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (E)




Electronics Engineering Option

Semester Five
total credit hours 18

Semester Six
total credit hours 18 (G) 17 (H)

Semester Seven
total credit hours 18 (G) 19 (H)

Semester Eight
total credit hours
18 (G) 17 (H)

PHYS 324-3 Electromagnetics

Cmpl I-3 first complementary elective

MACM 316-3 Numerical Analysis I

Cmpl II-3 second complementary studies elective




Scie I-3 science elective (G)

Tech I-3 technical (computing science, science or math) elective (H)

ENSC 201-3 The Business of Engineering










Scie I-3 science elective (H)

Computer Engineering Option

Semester Five
total credit hours 18

Semester Six
total credit hours 18 (G) 17 (H)

Semester Seven
total credit hours 17 (G) 18 (H)

Semester Eight
total credit hours 17

CMPT 275-4
Software Engineering

Cmpl I-3 first complementary elective (G)

CMPT 300-3 Operating Systems I

Cmpl II-3 second complementary studies elective

MACM 201-3 Discrete Mathematics II

Scie I-3 first science elective (G)

MACM 316-3 Numerical Analysis I

ENSC 201-3 The Business of Engineering







Cmpl I-3 first complementary elective (H)

Scie II-3 second science elective







Scie I-3 first science elective (H)




Engineering Physics Option

Semester Five
total credit hours 19

Semester Six
total credit hours 17

Semester Seven
total credit hours 19

Semester Eight
total credit hours 19

PHYS 324-3 Electromagnetics




PHYS 385-3 Quantum Physics

PHYS 384-3 Methods of Theoretical Physics

PHYS 233-2 Introductory Physics Laboratory A




PHYS 344-3 Thermal Physics

ENSC 201-3 The Business of Engineering

Cmpl II-3 second complementary elective




PHYS 365-3 Semiconductor Device Physics

PHYS 332-3 Intermediate Laboratory










PHYS 355-3 Optics










Phys 4XX-3 physics elective

Systems Option

Semester Five
total credit hours 19

Semester Six
total credit hours 18 (G) 17 (H)

Semester Seven
total credit hours 18 (G) 16 (H)

Semester Eight
total credit hours 15 (G) 18 (H)




Cmpl II-3 second complementary elective (G)

MACM 316-3 Numerical Analysis I

ENSC 201-3 The Business of Engineering




Scie I-3 science elective (G)

Cmpl II-3 second complementary elective (H)

Scie I-3 science elective (H)

Biomedical Engineering Option

Semester Five
total credit hours 19

Semester Six
total credit hours 18

Semester Seven
total credit hours 17

Semester Eight
total credit hours 20 

KIN 201-3 Biomechanics

Cmpl I-3 first complementary elective

Scie II-3 second science elective

Cmpl II-3 second complementary studies elective

MACM 316-3 Numerical Methods

KIN 308-3 Experiments and Models in Physiology




ENSC 201-3 The Business of Engineering

PHYS 221-3 Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism

STAT 270-3 Intro to Probability and Statistics







Scie I-3 first science elective












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