Robert Franco, Ph. D. Director, Office for Institutional Effectiveness



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  • Robert Franco, Ph.D.
  • Director, Office for Institutional Effectiveness
  • Professor of Pacific Anthropology
  • Kapi’olani Community College, Univ. of Hawai’i
  • bfranco@hawaii.edu

3 Parts Context: 1 Part Kapi’olani Community College

  • Civic Demography and Diversity
  • Higher Education in 21st Century
  • Crucible Moment: Service Learning and Civic Learning
  • Kapi’olani – Engagement, Learning, and Achievement

Civic Demography

  • Decades of Ethnic Diversity
  • 1980 – Inclusive Census (smaller groups count)
  • 1990 – Aggregative Census (fewer, bigger groups)
  • 2000 – Inclusive Census (smaller groups count)
  • ( more than one race reported)
  • 2010 - Inclusive Census (smaller groups count)
  • 2020 – Aggregative or Inclusive?

Civic Demography

  • For 2020, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander populations have some of the highest growth rates in the U.S.
  • “Failure to produce highly reliable estimates on numerically small diverse populations at the national level compromises effective planning and interventions to address their social, economic and health concerns.” (AAPI Nexus Journal Fall 2011).
  • Sustain focus on Native Hawaiian and other Underrepresented groups (Samoans, Micronesians, Filipinos)

Changes in American Higher Education: New Millennium

  • 2000-2010 – AAC&U - “Greater Expectations”
  • Access and Success for All Students –Edgar Beckham
  • 2002-2012 ACCJC/WASC “Learning Outcomes” for Students = Capabilities
  • 2002-2005 – Campus Compact – Indicators of Civic Engagement
  • 2006, 2008, 2010 - Carnegie Classification of Community Engagement
  • - INSTITUTIONAL HIGHER PURPOSE

Changes in American Higher Education: New Millenium

  • 2008 to present – AAC&U
  • “Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP)
  • 2010-2020 – Student Achievement of Degrees – Completion
  • 2012 – Crucible Moment – Civic Learning
  • 2015- Next UH System Strategic Plan
  • 2015 - UH System - Carnegie Community Engagement Classification?
  • 2020 – Lasting Agenda-Communities, Capabilities, and Completion

Crucible Moment: Service-Learning and Civic Learning

  • Increasing Poverty, Wealth Disparity
  • Immigration Reform Stalled
  • Declining Resources for Public Sector
  • Corporate, Energy, and Financial Sectors in Ascendance
  • Complex Energy-Climate Concerns
  • Local Concerns

Crucible Moment: Service-Learning and Civic Learning

  • Service Learning (AACC definition):
  • preparing students to participate in the public life of a community in an informed, committed, and constructive manner, focus on the common good.
  • “preparing citizens to care for their communities”
  • “force multiplier for the non-profit sector”
  • synergizing the social capital of students and the intellectual capital of faculty.
  • Strategic Plan 2008-2015
  • Long-Range Development Plan, 2020
  • Tactical Plans, 2009-12, 2012-15
  • Accreditation, 2012
  • 3 Year Comprehensive Program Review
  • Annual Review of Program Data

A High Impact Strategy

  • “Service-Learning is a teaching and learning method that integrates critical reflection and meaningful service in the community with academic learning, personal growth, and civic responsibility.”
  • - 500 studies of service-learning, 350 have shown positive outcomes (Furco, 2011).

Kapi’olani Service Learning

  • Kapi‘olani began its Service Learning initiative in 1995
  • Valuing diverse traditions of service in Hawaii’s indigenous and multicultural communities
  • Since that time more than 10,000 students have contributed nearly 230,000 hours of meaningful service to the community.

Mixed-Methods Assessment

  • CCSSE
  • Course Success and Fall-to-Spring Persistence
  • Pre- and post-tests in courses
  • Rubric based student learning outcomes assessment
  • Supervisor Evaluations – real world assessment

CCSSE Snapshot Data, 2010-12

  • 35% of part-time students and
  • 45% of full-time students reported having participated in “a community-based project as part of a regular course”
  • Students who reports community-based work also report greater engagement on all 5 CCSSE Benchmarks
  • From 2002-2012, the College has exceeded its peer institutions on this component of the active-collaborative benchmark.
  • For full report, please visit http://ofie.kcc.hawaii.edu

A High Impact Strategy

  • At Kapi’olani, Service-Learning interlocks with:
  • general education learning outcomes
  • 21st century career preparation
  • INNOVATIONS IN
  • indigenous, intercultural, and international learning
  • science, technology, engineering, math
  • student, faculty, community engagement
  • partnerships to solve real world problems (Carnegie Foundation Community Engagement Classified)

Defining SL “completion”

  • finished 20+ service-learning hours (supervised and evaluated course-embedded)
  • wrote required semester capstone essay to be rubric assessed in relation to new College General Education student learning outcomes
  • submitted all required forms signed

Completions –plural

  • Completion: Fall 2010, Spring 2011,Spring 2012 Service-Learners
  • 18 percent higher course success rates than non- Service-Learners
  • 20 percent higher fall-to-spring re-enrollment rates
  • Faster time to degree completion
  • Multi-SL Students even better rates
  • Transfer – Can we build transfer pathways?

Student Cohort; re-enrollment per semester

  • Terms
  • All students
  • SL students
  • Fall 09 to Spring 2010
  • 5933
  • 65.2%
  • 287
  • 82.7%
  • Spring 2010 to Fall 2010
  • 4857
  • 56.1%
  • 218
  • 74.2%

Student Cohort; Course Success

  • Course
  • Fall 2009 Success Rate
  • Spring 2010 Success Rate
  • All
  • SL students
  • All
  • SL students
  • ENG21
  • 108
  • 57.4%
  • 4
  • 100%
  • 19
  • 39.6%
  • 1
  • 100%
  • ENG22
  • 325
  • 62.1%
  • 5
  • 55.6%
  • 112
  • 50.5%
  • 5
  • 71.4%
  • MATH24
  • 206
  • 42%
  • 10
  • 83.3%
  • 116
  • 40.6%
  • 3
  • 33.3%
  • MATH25
  • 216
  • 43.6%
  • 13
  • 65%
  • 142
  • 46.4%
  • 10
  • 66.7%
  • MATH81
  • 71
  • 60.2%
  • 1
  • 50%
  • 28
  • 56.0%
  • 1
  • 100%
  • PCM23
  • 123
  • 49.2%
  • 4
  • 80%
  • 48
  • 46.2%
  • 1
  • 100%
  • College Level
  • 16,165
  • 70.7%
  • 617
  • 88.4%
  • 15,684
  • 70.8%
  • 893
  • 87.8%

Capabilities

  • Capabilities – Ongoing Assessment, 1996-2013
  • Supervisor Evaluations
  • - Reliability, Responsibility
  • Communication
  • Sensitivity to Clients
  • Willingness to Learn
  • Commitment to the Organization
  • Overall
  • Supervisor Ratings Consistently High (N>5,000)

Pre- and Post-test Assessments: 1996, 1998, 2006, 2012

  • Indicate statistically significant improvement in Service-Learners’ attitudes about
    • Working as a team
    • Ability to make a difference in the community
    • Instructors as caring individuals
    • Pre- and post-survey – Social Justice Findings
    • Public policy needs to be changed for problems to be solved
    • Reforms in the current system are required to improve our communities.

Going Deep on Service-Learning Outcomes Assessment

  • Reflection – General Education
  • Assessment Protocol
  • Reflection Rubric
  • Norming Essay
  • Scoresheet

Kapiolani Service Learning: Civic Scanning

  • Requires reciprocal community partnerships based on best practice principles:
  • - clear lines of communication
    • clear roles and responsibilities
    • campus-community needs assessment and assets mapping
    • tactical and strategic planning toward mutually beneficial goals, evaluation, and continuous improvement
    • measurably reduce the severity of problems in our community
  • Too High

Communities:6 Service Learning Pathways

Pathways Defined

  • Issue Based – reducing the severity of pressing social problems
  • Connect courses with schools and non-profit organizations
  • Connect courses over multiple semesters
  • To degree completion, careers, transfer
  • See Spring 2013 Course Matrix
  • Sustained social capital of students guided by sustained intellectual capital of faculty can “reduce the severity” of the problems we confront.
  • Members of Kapi‘olani Community College’s Service-Learning Team: Students: Nicole Medeiros, Kathryn Roberts, Michi Atkinson, Allan Kaleikilo, and Shannon Phenix. Outreach Coordinator, Melisa Orozco.
  • Oceanic Time Warner Cable President, Nate Smith: "What I'm hoping to do is use the power of our distribution and penetration to get the kids in the community involved in making it a better community themselves. It's about accountability." The partnership with Oceanic Time Warner Cable bridges the gap between education and entertainment. Palolo residents can now watch and learn their ABCs on TV.
  • Student leader, Michi Atkinson, sits with Palolo El students she tutors.
  • Kapiolani World AIDS Day

KCC STEM Mission

  • 1. To provide KCC Students with workforce skills and transfer opportunities in Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM)
  • 2. To provide STEM students with:
  • - a sense of place on campus;
  • - a clear academic or workforce goal
  • - funding opportunities

Malama i na Ahupua‘a

  • KCC Environmental Pathway Program

Land division stretching from the mountain to the sea-ahupua’a

  • Land division stretching from the mountain to the sea-ahupua’a

Life Sciences Pathway (two year curriculum)

  • Waikalua

Hawaii NSF EPSCoR Grant

  • Pacific High Island Biogeography: Impacts of Invasive Species, Anthropogenic Activity, and Climate Change on Hawaiian Focal Species
  • 5 years, $20 million
  • Kapi’olani co-leads the Diversity, Education, and Workforce Component (DEW)
  • STEM workforce=STEM careers, research community, professoriate

DEW within Hawaii EPSCoR Program

  • Paid undergraduate research internships in pre-transfer summers (8 per year). Private sector internships developed
  • Service-Learning to reach Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, and Filipino students and families with financial aid, college and career awareness programs
  • STEM into the Palolo Pipeline.
  • Discovery Science Center in Palolo Public Housing.
  • Ecological modeling of ahupua’a mountain-to-sea systems on O’ahu will “pathway” to new competitive science research on the Big Island of Hawai’i.

DEW within Hawaii EPSCoR Program

  • Focus on getting more Native Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders, and Filipinos into STEM majors at UH Manoa and UH Hilo, and STEM career statewide
  • STEM workforce=STEM careers, research community, professoriate
  • Evaluation and research to contribute to the growing number of models for broadening participation of underrepresented groups.

Kapi‘olani Ecology of Learning

  • Countries Abroad
  • Community
  • Campus
  • Centers & Labs
  • Cyberspace
  • Classrooms

Accreditation Commendations 2012-13

  • Refining and implementing a mission statement that reflects the commitment of the College to meet the educational needs of the Native Hawaiian people.
  • Commitment to honoring and nurturing the Native Hawaiian culture reflected in structure, activities, and programs.
  • The depth and breadth of the programs and cultural activities that contribute to an environment that honors Native Hawaiian faculty, staff, and students, and encourages diversity and civic engagement for all.

Supervisor Evaluations N=>5,000: Capabilities

  • Reliability and Responsibility
  • Communication Skills
  • Willingness to Learn
  • Sensitivity to Clients
  • Overall

Student Learning Outcomes Assessment

  • students’ reflection essays
  • end-of-semester service learning survey
  • pre- and post tests replicated
  • content and theme analysis
  • Complete report to be posted at kcc.ofie.hawaii.edu by August 1, 2011

Pathways

  • Education
  • Environment
  • Health
  • Elders
  • International
  • Arts, History & Culture

Student Engagement Measures

  • active-and-collaborative learning
  • student-faculty interaction
  • student effort
  • academic challenge
  • support services student service
  • CCSSE 2010 available on OFIE website: http://ofie.kcc.hawaii.edu

Contact information:

  • Robert Franco, Phd.
  • bfranco@hawaii.edu
  • Website:
  • http://ofie.kcc.hawaii.edu


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