Questioning: Students ask questions that facilitate the solution of problems and the pursuit of opportunities



Download 14,56 Kb.
Date conversion04.06.2017
Size14,56 Kb.
  • Questioning
  • Josh Reid, Ph.D.

QUESTIONING:  Students ask questions that facilitate the solution of problems and the pursuit of opportunities.

  • INtopFORM Summer Workshop 2014
  • Assessment and Implementation Planning Worksheet
  • Part I: Write each INtopFORM Learning Outcome Using Language Appropriate for your discipline
  • BSC: Students learn how to generate scientific hypotheses about biological phenomenon.
  • SW: Students will engage in inquiring questions to examine different theories.
  • Nurses: Students ask questions facilitating caring for patients and their families, helping them heal and enhancing their lives.
  • Sports Management: Formulate questions that will facilitate the exploring of a client’s needs.
  • My version from 2013:
  • Students will develop a questioning habit of mind to analyze the texts in the class and their own writing.
  • Part 2: Mark the items that best describe how you hope your majors will excel with respect to each INtopFORM learning outcome. Check all that apply. Then, write your own items that are especially relevant to your majors’ ability to demonstrate information fluency skills.
  • QUESTIONING: Students ask questions that facilitate the solution of problems and the pursuit of opportunities.
  • Questions define the scope of the area of interest.
  • Questions identify key issues to be resolved.
  • Questions encourage a broad search for information.
  • Questions are relevant to the problem, task or topic.
  • Questions examine diverse perspectives on the problem, task or topic.
  • Questions reflect attitudes of openness and curiosity.
  • Additional items that are especially relevant to your majors’ ability to ask good questions:
  • 1.
  •  
  •  
  • 2.
  •  
  •  
  • AMNIOCENTESIS
  • What is amniocentesis?
  • What is it used for?
  • Where did it originate?
  • How was it developed?
  • Does it help?
  • Who discovered it?
  • How does it work?
  • Does it hurt?
  • Is it harmful?
  • Does it cost a lot?
  • Should it be used?
  • When is it needed?
  • Is it practical?
  • Is it accurate?
  • Is it safe?
  • Do all women need it?
  • What does it show?
  • What negative effects are associated with it?
  • Why was it developed?
  • What improvements have been made?
  • In order for students to develop a questioning habit of mind to analyze the texts in the class and their own writing.
  • Question-making must become a core component of course content.
  • Students should feel like their questions matter.

Some Questions are Better Than Others

Some Questions are More Insightful Than Others

  • Open-ended
  • How/Why
  • Process/Multiple Answers/Detailed answers
  • Closed
  • What/When/Who/Where
  • Fact-based/Yes or No/True or False
  • Who are the main characters?
  • What happens in the beginning of the story?
  • What is the second section of a lab report?
  • Why do the characters act the way that they do?
  • Why does the story start that way? What effect does it have?
  • Why does the methods section occur where it does? How does it serve the audience?
  • AMNIOCENTESIS
  • What is amniocentesis?
  • What is it used for?
  • Where did it originate?
  • How was it developed?
  • Does it help?
  • Who discovered it?
  • How does it work?
  • Does it hurt?
  • Is it harmful?
  • Does it cost a lot?
  • Should it be used?
  • When is it needed?
  • Is it practical?
  • Is it accurate?
  • Is it safe?
  • Do all women need it?
  • What does it show?
  • What negative effects are associated with it?
  • Why was it developed?
  • What improvements have been made?
  • AMNIOCENTESIS
  • What is amniocentesis?
  • What is it used for?
  • Where did it originate?
  • How was it developed?
  • Does it help?
  • Who discovered it?
  • How does it work?
  • Does it hurt?
  • Is it harmful?
  • Does it cost a lot?
  • Should it be used?
  • When is it needed?
  • Is it practical?
  • Is it accurate?
  • Is it safe?
  • Do all women need it?
  • What does it show?
  • What negative effects are associated with it?
  • Why was it developed?
  • What improvements have been made?

Questions: Content-Specific

  • Seeking Meaning
  • How does the artist use the elements of art (line/shape/color/texture) to express effect/meaning?
  • What literary terms is the author using in this stanza? Why is he or she using them? To what effect?
  • Important themes/movements/problems posed as questions
  • Impressionism: How can an artist depict human experience in the age of the photograph and its relentless realism?
  • Milton: How can I reconcile classical Epic with the Bible?

Questions: Audience

  • What questions about human cloning might a
  • Prospective parent
  • Person with diabetes
  • Legislator
  • Member of the clergy
  • Attorney specializing in children’s rights
  • Ask?
  • *From “Whose Questions?” Teaching Critical Thinking, Dr. William G. Kirkwood
  • For Scream activity, what questions might a
  • Contemporary viewer
  • Art conservationist
  • Investor
  • Audience living in Munch’s day
  • Historian
  • Painter
  • Ask?

Questions: Grading Criteria

  • Content/Organization
  • Do you have four fully developed sections of the proposal that fulfill the requirements of the assignment?
  • Does the proposal demonstrate clear strategies of persuasion?
  • Are your transitions effective between sections and paragraphs and sentences?
  • Do you utilize topic sentences?
  • Do you stay focused?
  • Does your conclusion answer the question, “so what?”
  • Do you have a clear thesis statement in your introduction on why this project is important enough to deserve funding?
  • Is your research question clearly articulated in your introduction?
  • Do you use at least four scholarly secondary sources?
  • Do you analyze closely at least one primary source and discuss how that research contributes to your hypothesis?
  • Style/Mechanics
  • Is your style appropriate for your audience? Is it formal without being stilted, accessible without being chatty?
  • Are your sentences varied in length, structure, and word choices?
  • Do you write with active verbs?
  • Are your ideas clearly expressed?
  • Mechanics/Conventions
  • Is your paper spell-checked?
  • Is your paper free from reoccurring grammatical errors?
  • Do you cite your sources correctly (both in-text and on a works cited page)?
  • Are your sources properly summarized and are quotes from those sources properly integrated?
  • Do you follow the “formal requirements” for page length, title, header, etc.?

Questions: INtopFormTastic!

  • SEEKING: Where can I find information/sources to answer this question? How can I test this question?
  • EVALUATE: Is this source scholarly or popular? Does this source pass the CRAP test?
  • USING: Where can I place this source in my paper? Which quotes/what data will help support my point here?
  • RECOGNIZING: Am I citing this source correctly in MLA/APA/Chicago style?

Questions: Writing/Peer Review

  • What is my argument? Where is my thesis statement?
  • How does this introduction engage the reader?
  • Who is my audience?
  • How does this paragraph support the argument?
  • How can I connect this paragraph with the previous one?
  • What is the focus of this paragraph?
  • How so?
  • Do I have an example?
  • Can I come up with an analogy here?

Questions: Study Skills/Metacognition

  • Brainstorming for lecture: What questions about today’s reading/topic do I hope will be covered for class today?
  • Brainstorming topics: What text(s) am I most interested in writing about?
  • Exam Questions: Based on the material covered for today, what is a likely test question for the exam?
  • Growth Mindset: How can I use my instructor’s feedback to improve for next time? How can I use this grade/error/mistake to grow?
  • Text Annotation: Why does the writer open the essay this way? What is his/her evidence for this assertion? Why is this sentence so effective?
  • How do I study? What is my writing process?
  • Why am I studying this? Why is it important? Why is it important to me?
  • “Knowledge is produced in response to questions. And new knowledge results from the asking of new questions; quite often new questions about old questions. Here is the point: Once you have learned how to ask questions—relevant and appropriate and substantial questions—you have learned how to learn and no one can keep you from learning whatever you want or need to know.”
  • -Neil Postman & Charles Weingartner, Teaching as a Subversive Activity
  • Part 3: Describe a teaching idea your heard or thought about today that you want to use to teach your students each of the INtopFORM learning outcomes. Describe when and where you plan to try out this idea.
  • QUESTIONING: Students ask questions that facilitate the solution of problems and the pursuit of opportunities.
  • Idea:
  • When & Where
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  


The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2016
send message

    Main page