Proposal for a Bachelor of Science Program in Criminal Justice at wvu tech



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Proposal for a Bachelor of Science

Program in Criminal Justice

at WVU Tech
Part I. Program Description
A. Program Background and Objectives
West Virginia University Institute of Technology (WVU Tech), which will become a

division of West Virginia University on July 1, 2007. seeks approval to offer a

baccalaureate of science 4egree program in Criminal Justice.


WVU Tech has a concentration in Criminal Justice; however, students and employers want the major designation rather than a concentration. In fact some agencies will not accept a concentration in lieu of the major.
The major is a focused curriculum designed to meet the needs of students, employers, and society. The interest in a criminal justice program at WVU Tech is strong as indicated by the expression of interest from law enforcement and correctional personnel and frequent inquiries regarding criminal justice during recruitment fairs. Criminal Justice is one of the most popular majors on those campuses which offer the criminal justice major.
The program will provide preparation for entering the practice of criminal justice (e.g., police courts, corrections, homeland security) and/or graduate education. Specific objectives include the following:
Graduates of the program will be able to identi& and define “key” terms utilized within the criminal justice discipline

Graduates of the program will be able to describe the applicable historical development of criminal justice as a discipline

• Graduates of the program will be able to describe the history and development of the components of the criminal justice system

• Graduates of the program will be able to describe and discuss the applicable major theories involved in the criminal justice discipline

• Graduates of the program will be able to analyze the operations, policies, and procedures within the criminal justice system

• Graduates of the program will be able to analyze and describe the agencies of justice and the procedures used to identi& and treat criminal offenders

• Graduates of the program will be able to recognize trends in crime and criminal behavior and methods of prevention and treatment

• Graduates of the program will be able to effectively research issues, trends, and history of the criminal justice field/discipline.

Graduates of the program will be able to critique the effectiveness of treatment

programs


used in AY2007-2008. As enrollment projections are met, one additional faculty position will be allocated to criminal justice via internal re-allocation of a position.
D. Library Resources and Instructional Materials
The use of existing professional journals already part of the university’s holdings will provide a nucleus of support for the proposed program. Appendix C contains information on costs associated with the program proposal.
K SuoDort Service Requirements
Current classroom facilities in the COBE Building provide adequate space for support of the proposed Criminal Justice B.S. program and existing degree programs. No additional equipment or classroom facilities are anticipated. Recent studies suggest that WVU Tech’s classroom facilities are underutilized. It is estimated that about half of the criminal justice courses in the proposed curriculum already exist at WVU Tech. The remaining courses will be developed and taught predominantly by full-time faculty with expertise in the particular content area. Adjunct faculty will be employed based upon their ability to meet minimum standards for appointment and on expertise needed for the curriculum.
F. Operating Resource Requirements
Operation of the Criminal Justice B.S. program will rely, to a large extent, on existing WVU Tech resources, service, and personnel. New resources required to support the program include 2.75 faculty (two hill time, tenure track position and 2-3 adjuncts) and current expense dollars (department operating budget). The details regarding these needs are shown in Appendix C.
Most new costs associated with personnel will be incurred within the first two years of the program. In the first year, a new full-time faculty member and an adjunct would be employed to assist the current faculty in providing courses for the program. In 2008, two additional adjuncts would be added and another full-time faculty member would be added in 2009. Through aggressive marketing, it is anticipated that the growth in student majors would more than offset the costs associated with the addition of the additional faculty.
G. Source of Oneratint Resources
Operating resources will be derived from the WVU Tech central budget. It is estimated that the Criminal Justice B.S. program will allow WVU Tech to increase its overall undergraduate enrollment beyond that which would have been expected had the program not been initiated. While it is difficult to estimate the incremental enrollment increase, it is anticipated that the program will attract sufficient enrollment to not only offset the additional costs for operating the program, but also will add to the financial assets of the institution. An expectation for tenure-track faculty will include procurement of external funding.

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Appendix A: Admission Standards, WVU Tech
General Requirements for Admission
Graduation from an accredited high school with a minimum overall GPA of 2.0

Minimum high school credits



o 4 units of English

o 3 units of Social Sciences

o 3 units of Mathematics (Algebra I & higher)

o 3 units of Science (two of three must be laboratory science)

Overall high school GPA 2.0 or higher

Composite score ACT 17 or SAT 830
Or
Meet General Education (GED) requirements

Complete the ACT or SAT and have test scores sent directly from ACT or SAT


Or
Non-residents must rank in upper three-fourths of their graduating class

Complete the ACT or SAT and have test scores sent directly from ACT or S



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Appendix B: Enrollment

University System Administrative Bulletin No. 23 Form 1, Page 1 of I

No. of Student Credit

from Courses within

Program





Year 1 I Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5




2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

No. of Students Served by Courses in program:
















a. HeadcoLjnt

63

100

100

168

168

b.FTE

26

70

100

¶30

160

Number of student
Credit Hours from
Majors in Program

-










375

950

1500

1950

2400

Degrees Granted

0

4

6

12

18

Number of Majors:

a, Headcount

b:FTE Majors

525

13

13

1150

35

35

2325

50

50

2325

65

65

2325

80

50

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Appendix C: Five-Year Projection of Operating Resources & Costs


University System Administrative Bulletin No. 23
Form 2, Page 1 of 2
A. FTE Positions

Personnel

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5







2007

2008

2009

2010

2011




Administrators































Full-time Faculty

1.0

1.0

2.0

2.0

2.0




Adjunct Faculty (FTE)

0,25

0.5

0.75

0.75

0.75




Graduate Assistants Other Personnel































Clerical Workers

0.33

0.33

0.33

0.33

0.33




Professionals































Other Personnel































Note: Include percentage of time of current personnel

B. Operating Costs




1. Personal Services a. Administrators

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

YearS







2007

2008

2009

2010

2011





































b. Full-time Faculty

$44,000.00

$44,000.00

$33,000.00

$88030.00

$58,030.00




c. Adjunct Faculty (FTE)

$4,000.00

$800000

$12,000.00

$12,000.00

$12,000.00




d. Graduate Assistants































e. Non-Academic Personnel































Clerical Workers































Professionals































Total Salaries

$80000.00

$64,360.00

$100,000.00

$100,000.00

$100,000.00

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University System Administrative Bulletin No. 23
Form 2, Page 2 of 2

Five-Year Projection of Total Operatina Resources_Requirernents*




Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5




2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2. Office Expenses

$ 1,000.00

$1,000.00

$1000.00

$1,000.00

$ 1,000.00

3. Repairs and Alts,
















4. Eguipment
















Education Equip.

$ 4,000.00

$1000.00

$1,000.00

$1,000.00

$ 1,000.00

Library Books .
5. NonrecurTing Exp.

$ 500.00

$500.00

$ 500.00

$ 500.00

$ 500.00




$ 2,000.00













Total Costs

$ 7500.00

$2,500.00

$2,500.00

$2,500.00

$ 2,500.00

C. Sources
1. General Fund (University) Appropriations

x

Reallocation

New Funds

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

67.50000

$66,860.00

$102,500.00

$102,500.00

$102500.00

2. Federal Government ______________ __________

3. Private Sources _______________ ___________

Total All Sources ______________ __________

NOTE: Total costs should be equal to total sources of funding
*Explain your Method for Predicting the Numbers (see next page)

Year 1



2007

Year 2

2008

Year 3



2009

Year 4

2010

Year 5

Year 1

2011

2007

Year 2


2008

Year 3

2009


Year 4

2010

Year S

2011

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

$ 67,500.00

$66,860.00

$102,500.00

$102,500.00

$102500.00.

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By year five, there will be 80 students majoring in Criminal Justice, of which it is estimated 60 will be “new” students. Each student will enroll for an avenge of 15 credit hours. Criminal Justice is one of the most popular majors on those campuses which offer the criminal justice major. The estimates given are conservative based on the potential that exists.


Appendix D. New Courses
JJ ‘CMJS 120 Survey of Criminal Justice (3 credits)

~/~/ CMJS 245 Criminal Law (3 credits)

JI CMJS 134 Substance Abuse Policy (3 credits)

j CMJS 310 Law Enforcement Administration (3 credits)

CMJS 320 Courts and Judicial Systems (3 credits)

j.j CMJS 410 Criminal Investigations (3 credits)

-~/~f CMJS 475 Seminar in Criminal Justice (3 credits)

4/ SOCA 302 Deviant Behavior (3 credits)

Appendix Ei Syllabi
See attached

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otb



>1

Syllabus CMJS - 475 Senior Seminar

Instructor

Location

Time

Phone

Email
This capstone course integrates the knowledge and skills the students have acquired during all of their major course work. All students must be Criminal Justice seniors in good standing and have permission of the instructor. Instruction will be in the classroom with two field trips outside the classroom setting.
Course Requirements:
1. To attend class and prepare assignment to be designated by the appropriate speaker for

this class period. Speakers will be in the classroom setting. Assignments will be worth 50



points each. Each assignment will be due the week following the speakers presentation.

250 total points
Speakers will include but may not be limited to the following:

Judge, probation officer, prison guard, prison administrator, released inmate, police officer.
2. To prepare a research paper pertaining to a contemporary problem in or criminal justice system. Selection of topic must be approved by the instructor. This paper will be due one week prior to the last day of classes.

Detailed instructions for this research will be forthcoming. 100 points


3. To prepare a comprehensive resume that accentuates their education and qualifications. 50 points. This resume will be due the last day of classes. Details will be forthcoming.
4. To aft end the two field trips. Details will be forthcoming.

Tentative field trips will include a visit to a correctional complex and a visit to the

courtroom to set in on a criminal triaL Each field trip will be 50 points

Students must attend field trips.


The total number of points possible is 400. This number accounts for two 50 point assignments being dropped from above categories (I) and (3) only.


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Learning outcomes:


After completing this course the student will be able to do the following:
1. Identify the major issues facing the criminal justice system.
2. Demonstrate critical analysis how major issues are being reviewed and resolved.
3. Examine and analyze issues related to the administration ofjustice in the U.S.
4. Know and be able to identify the various careers available in criminal justice, thereby preparing students to make informed choices.
Total Points and grading scale:
Grading:

A=90%-100% 400-360 points A

B = 80% - 89% 359 - 320 points B

C70%-79% 319-280 points C

D=60%-69% 279-240 points D

F59%andunder.


Honesty Policy:
Academic dishonesty violates the fundamental ethical principles of WVU-Tech. Dishonesty of any type including plagiarizing will not be accepted. The honesty policy in this class is simple.

You cheat, you fail the whole course!! U You will be asked to sign a statement verifying you understand this policy.
Attendance Policy:
It is extremely important not to miss class. More then two unexcused absences will result in 5 lost points. We do frequent classroom activities. Classroom work cannot be made up.
I encourage students to see me as soon as they discover they axe having problems so that I might offer help and suggestions. My goal and my responsibility is to make your learning experience a productive one. Students should also alert me if any special circumstances exist that may result in particular needs (examples: visual or hearing impainnents or any documented learning disabilities). Please contact the Director of Counseling or see me about contacting her if your special needs have not been identified.
Office Hours:

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday

2

Thursday, Friday



Class Schedule
A research topic will be due by the third week of class. Suggestions and instructions will be provided.
Law Enforcement — Unit one (3 weeks)

This unit will include an introduction to the seminar and emphasis will be placed on the flexible nature of the seminar. In order to accommodate guest speakers the schedule may be altered. The student will be notified of any changes to the class schedule in a timely fashion.


Speaker one will represent law enforcement. l’his speaker will be a police officer or a county sheriff. The speaker will assign a paper to be due the following week.
The Court System — Unit Two (4 weeks)
Speaker two will represent the court system. This speaker will be a judge or prosecuting attorney. The speaker will assign a paper that Will be due the following week.
Speaker three will represent the court system from another perspective. This speaker will be a public defender or a private defense attorney. The speaker will assign a paper that will be due the following week.
A field trip a court room in session will be arranged as part of this unit. Paper I Due
Department of Corrections — Unit Three (3 weeks)
Speaker four will represent the Department of Corrections (DOC). This speaker wilt be a prison guard or warden at a state or federal prison. The speaker will assign a paper that will be due the following week.
A field trip to a correctional complex will be arranged as part of this unit.

Paper 2 Due

Research Topic Due

Re-natty and rehabilitation — Unit four (3 weeks)


Speaker five will represent the available programs and monitoring of released inmates. Ideally the speaker will be a released inmate and will be able to tell the students about the obstacles encountered. A probation officer may also be included. An assignment will be given and due the following week.

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Research paper is due before the last week of classes.
Paper 3 Due
Pulling it all together Unit five (2 weeks)
This unit will discuss career opportunities. Students will create a resume and receive feedback from faculty on their resume. The resume is due the last week of classes.
Paper 4 Due

Resume Due


Congratulations Seniors ©©

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• Graduates of the program will be able to recognize ethical dilemmas within the criminal justice system, and be able to interpret what would be the proper course(s) of action



• Graduates of the program will be able to effectively communicate through written and verbal presentations historical developments of the correctional system and theories behind punishment

• Graduates of the program will be able to recognize and discuss how personal and cultural differences affect behavior and communication in American society

• Graduates of the program will be able to evaluate and distinguish current social science research methodology through hypothesis development, analysis of findings, and to compare and contrast types of social research methods

• Graduates of the program will be able to apply “key” terms utilized within the criminal justice discipline and apply the research and literature of the discipline


B. Program Identification
It is recommended that the CI? code of 43.0103 be applied to the Criminal Justice B.S. program.
C. Program Features and Curriculum
The curriculum was developed to conform to the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences’ Ad-Hoc Committee on Minimum Standards for Criminal Justice Education. Members of this national committee were selected to represent the diversity of the Academy by gender, ethnicity, region, and level of criminal justice programs from community college to Ph.D. granting institutions. The committee members were: Timothy Flanagan. Sam Houston State University; Peter Kratcoski, Kent State University; Harvey McMurray, North Carolina Central University; Marilyn McShane, Northern Arizona University; Franklyn Taylor, Community College of Rhode Island; and Mittie Southerland, Chair, Murray State University.
The committee’s standards, which are the backbone of this proposed program, were the result of two years of review, discussion and revision. The standards also reflect current college and university accreditation standards and a modification of the standards of Northeastern Association of Criminal Justice Sciences (NEACJS). The NEACJS standards were built on those outlined by the Joint Commission on Criminology and Criminal Justice Education.
Among the notable features of the program are a course in research methods and a capstone practicum externship that places the student in a supervised setting for professional competence development.
Students must meet WVU Tech’s admission requirements for entry into baccalaureate programs and do the following:
Completing the university’s general education curriculum

Maintaining a minimum of 2.0 GPA in all CMJS courses attempted.


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WVU Tech

Department of Social Sciences and Public Administration

Criminal Justice B.S.
CMJS 120: Survey of Criminal Justice
A. Locator Information
Term:

Credit Hours: 3

Meeting Times:

Class Location:

Instructor:

Office Location: COB1t

Office Telephone:

Email:

Office Hours:
B. Course Description
A survey course designed to familiarize students with the functions, structure, and organization of the agencies that are responsible for the administration of justice in America. Specifically, the course deals with the police and issues related to law enforcement, prosecution of offenders, the judicial system, and corrections,
C. Required Textbook
Bobm R., and Haley, K. (2005). Introduction to Criminal Justice, New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.
Additional Readings: Aside from the required text, there might be some additional readings, which will be put on reserve in the library.
D. Course Objectives
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
I. Identify the major components of the U.S. Criminal Justice System and describe the structure of this system.
2. Understand how each of these components works in dealing with those who come in contact with the system.
3. Examine issues related to the administration of justice in the United States for example, plea-bargaining, police misconduct, and punishment of offenders.
4. Think critically about different issues related to our criminal justice system.
5. Cain some working knowledge that you can use later in your professional life if you want to work with the criminal justice system.
E. Evaluation Criteria

Cradin!

Point Distribution:

Participation 100 points

Pre-quizzes 140 points

Post-quizzes 140 points

Exams (total 3) 300 points (100 each)

Total 680 points
Grading Scale
92% - 100% (626-680 points) A
83% - 91% (565-625 points)— B
73% - 82% (491—564 points) C
64% - 72% (435—496 points) D
Below 63% (Below 435 points) F

F. Course Outline and Reading Schedule
Here is a tentative outline ofactivities that we plan to complete throughout the semester. Please note that this outline can be changed depending on the progress of the class. You are welcome to bring up and discuss any issue in the class that you think might contribute to enhance our understanding ol the issues related to the course.
Week I. Getting along: Introduction to each other, introduction to the course and syllabus and textbook(s).
Week 2. Pre-Quiz Chapter 1

Crime and Justice in the United States, Reading: Ch. 1

Post Quiz Chapter 1

Pre-Quiz Chapter 2

Week 3. Crime and its Consequences. Reading: Ch. 2.

Post Quiz Chapter 2

Pre-Quiz Chapter 3

Week 4. Explaining Crime. Reading~ Ch. 3.

Post Quiz Chapter 3

Pre-Quiz Chapter 4

Week 5. The Rule of Law. Ch. 4.

Post Quiz Chapter 4

Pre-Quiz ChapterS

Week 6. History and Structure of American Law Enforcement. Cli. S

Post Quiz ChapterS

Pre-Quiz Chapter 6

Week 7. Policing: Roles, Styles, and Functions, Ch. 6

Post Quiz Chapter 6

Pre-Quiz Chapter 7

WeekS. Policing America: Issues and Ethics. Ch. 7

Post Quiz Chapter 7

Pre-Quiz Chapter 8

Week 9. The Administration of Justice, Ch. 8

Post Quiz ChapterS

Pre-Quiz Chapter 9

Week 10. Sentencing, Appeals, and Death Penalty. Ch. 9
Post Quiz Chapter 9

Pre-Quiz Chapter 10

Week 11. Institutional Corrections. Ch. 10

Post Quiz Chapter 10

Pre-Quiz Chapter II

Week 12. Prison Life, Inmate Rights, Release, and Recidivism. Ch. 11

Post Quiz Chapter 11

Pre-Quiz Chapter 12

Week 13. Community Corrections. Ch. 12

Post Quiz Chapter 12

Pre-Quiz Chapter 13

Week 14. Juvenile Justice. Ch. 13

Post Quiz Chapter 13

Pre-Quiz Chapter 14

Week IS. The Future of Criminal Justice in the United States. Ch. 14

Post Quiz Chapter 14
G. Course Requirements
Attendance and Class Participation: It is highly recommended that you attend each class session. You should notice that there are 100 points devoted to class participation. I will keep record of your attendance. However, mere presence in the class is not enough for achieving these points. Rather, you need to participate in the class by asking questions, responding to questions and contributing your ideas. You need to demonstrate that you read the text and other suggested literature. Learning is an interactive process and, to learn something in its full depth, someone needs to take part in this process. If you think that you already know the issues that we discuss in the class, then your presence and participation will contribute to enhancing our knowledge.
The semester will be divided into three parts for participation purposes (from 1” day of class to V’ exam, from I’~ exam to 2~ exam, and from 2°d exam to final exam). At the end of each part, you will given you a score of your participation, which will help you to assess your performance.
A participation grade for each part will be calculated up to 100 points. At the end of the semester, your participation grades for all parts will be averaged into 100 points. To determine your
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