Professional School Applicants Spring ‘16 Meeting Common Professional School Exams



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professional School Applicants Spring ‘16 Meeting

Common Professional School Exams

  • DAT (Dental Admissions Test)
  • GRE (Graduate Record Examination)
  • PCAT (Pharmacy College Admissions Test)
  • MCAT (Medical College Admissions Test)
      • Summary Reports @ aamc.org/mcat
      • “How Scores are Used by Medical Schools”

Holistic Review

  • Flexible & Individualized Assessment
  • Balanced consideration is given to experiences, attributes, and academic metrics
  • How the individual might contribute value as a medical student and physician
  • Read about the Holistic Review Process: https://www.aamc.org/initiatives/holisticreview/about/

Ratings of Core Personal Competencies’ Importance to Entering Student’s Success in Medical School

Importance of Application Data: Invitation to Interview / Acceptances

  • Red = Academic Data
  • Blue = Experiential Data
  • Black = Combination
  • 5 = Extremely Important
  • 4 = Very Important
  • 3 = Important
  • 2 = Somewhat Important
  • 1 = Not Important

Internal Review Process

  • Applicant File
    • Biographical Report
    • Transcripts
    • Personal Statement/Responses to Prompts
  • Ratings
    • Good
    • Very good
    • Excellent
    • Superior
  • Interviews w/ 3 members of the Health Professions Committee
  • Committee Ratings Based On:
    • Overall/Science GPA (avg 3.67/3.65)
    • Academic Rigor/Strength of Schedule
    • Leadership
    • Service
    • Clinical Experience
    • Extracurriculars
    • Letters of Recommendation
    • Maturity/Readiness
    • Interview

HPC Application Timeline

  • Student generally go through HPC during the academic year leading up their application, 2 years prior to matriculating.
  • (Process begins Fall 2016 for Fall 2018 matriculation)
  • Oct: Deadline to join HPC
  • Jan-Feb: HPC Interviews
  • Mar-Apr: HPC Review Period
  • June 1: All Final HPC Materials Submitted
  • June: Complete Primary Applications
  • http://sites.middlebury.edu/hpandstem/application-timetable/

AMCAS Application Deadlines

  • AMCAS applications open the first week of May
  • Begin submitting applications to AMCAS the first week of June
    • Plan to submit your primary application as early in June as possible
  • Use the AMCAS Instruction Manual and AMCAS Tools and Tutorials for information about how to accurately classify courses, etc.
  • Application Deadlines

How does AMCAS work?

The AMCAS Application

  • Identifying Information
  • Schools Attended
  • Biographic Information
  • Course Work
  • Work/Activities
  • Letters of Evaluation
  • Medical Schools List
  • Essay(s)
  • Standardized Tests
  • aamc.org/amcas

Releasing Dossier to Schools

  • Middlebury submits applications to Medical Schools through Interfolio; applicants submit to AMCAS
  • Veterinary and Dental Schools receive applications via their application systems.

Interviewing

  • Review and Practice
  • Stay up-to-date with research and healthcare issues
  • www.studentdoctor.net
  • Follow-up with thank-you notes
    • Send to each health professions committee member that interviews you
    • Send to Director of Admissions at medical schools where you interview

Admissions & Health Professions Committees Seek Answers to the Follow Questions

BUILDING YOUR SCHOOL LIST

Choosing Where to Apply to Medical School

    • Important & challenging part of the application process
    • Time consuming
    • Can be expensive

Commonly Asked Questions

  • How many schools should I apply to?
  • How does my state of residency impact where I should apply?
  • How do I make sense of residency requirements?
  • Are there new medical schools I should consider applying to?
  • Are there special interstate agreements?
  • Should I consider applying to public medical schools that are out-of-state for me?
  • How should my GPA and MCAT score affect where I apply?
  • How important should rankings be as I decide where to apply?
  • Aren’t all mission statements the same?
  • What should I look for as I examine a school’s curriculum?
  • Should cost be a factor in my decision of where to apply?
  • What other factors should I consider?
  • I want to apply to MD/PhD programs. How do I decide where to apply?
  • I want to apply to osteopathic medical schools. How do I decide where to apply?

1. How many schools should I apply to?

  • ~15-20 schools
  • 25+ schools generally indicates a lack of strategy and that the schools have not been well researched

2. How does my state of residency impact where I should apply?

  • Applying as an in-state candidate usually puts you at an advantage
  • Many state schools have <15% of their class from outside their state
  • Tuition tends to be lower

3. How do I make sense of residency requirements?

  • In the Medical School Admissions Requirements (MSAR), each school’s listing includes the numbers of ‘resident’ and ‘non-resident’ applicants, interviewees, and matriculants.
  • The Princeton Health Professions Advising website is a great resource.
  • Residency rules vary from state to state, and HOW residents and non-residents are defined by an Admissions committee varies from school to school.

4. Are there new medical schools I should consider applying to?

  • The AAMC (Association of American Medical Colleges) website is a great resource. (www.aamc.org)
  • List of recently accredited and new schools are overviewed in Snapshot of the New and Developing Medical Schools in the U.S. and Canada.
  • There are also many new osteopathic schools listed there.

5. Are there special interstate agreements?

  • Yes - some states that either don’t have medical schools or who have very few have created special interstate agreements so that their residents will have in-state privileges
  • WICHE
    • Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education operates an exchange program for students from 13 western states that gives them preference in admission & reduced tuition in selected out of state medical & other professional schools
  • WWAMI
    • The University of Washington School of Medicine serves as the public school for Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho.
  • FAME
    • Finance Authority of Maine’s Access to Medical Education Program, which gives Maine residents preferred access to Dartmouth, Vermont, and UNECOM.
  • DIMER
    • Delaware Institute of Medical Education & Research, which has Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia serve as Delaware’s medical school.

6. Should I consider applying to public medical schools that are out-of-state for me?

  • It depends on which school…
  • Consult the Medical School Admissions Requirements (MSAR) and the chart entitled ‘Acceptance & Matriculation Data’
  • When a public school has over 25% of its class from out-of-state, there’s a reasonable chance of qualified out-of-staters being considered.
  • The percentage of in-state versus out-of-state residents is also available on this AAMC Site: http://www.aamc.org/data/facts/start.htm

7. How should my GPA and MCAT score affect where I apply?

  • Consult the MSAR (again!)
  • MSAR Online contains admissions statistics including the school’s mean MCAT and the ranges of overall and science GPAs they accept.
  • Use this data to assess whether or not you will be a competitive candidate at a specific school.
  • Make sure you select a mix of schools where you are at or close to the average GPA and some schools where you may be above the average.
  • Take a similar approach with the MCAT.

8. How important should rankings be as I decide where to apply?

  • Be careful not to put too much emphasis on rankings. Apply to a diverse group of schools.
  • The U.S. News and World Report ranking uses a methodology that may change year to year and may emphasize qualities that are not as important to you.
  • Think about which schools will be the best fit for you; where you can thrive.

9. Aren’t all mission statements the same?

  • Not necessarily. Some vary pretty dramatically.
  • You want to identify schools whose mission parallels your professional goals and personal values.
  • You can read each school’s mission statement in the MSAR.
  • It’s also important to explore the websites of your schools of interest.
    • They often feature more in-depth information about the school’s philosophy.

10. What should I look for as I examine a school’s curriculum?

  • Consider your learning style.
  • The AAMC website has Curriculum Inventory and Reports (CIR) page which provides information about the structure, delivery, and assessment of medical school curricula.
  • Look at the grading policy of the school.
    • Pass/No Pass vs. Letter Grading System
  • Residency program information. (American Medical Association) www.ama-assn.org

11. Should cost be a factor in my decision of where to apply?

  • Tuition varies considerably based on factors including residency, availability of scholarships, etc.
  • While nearly all medical students graduate with some debt, the amount of that debt can range from between a few thousand dollars to upwards of $200,000.
  • MSAR includes information on financial aid.
  • Important to balance financial benefits of various programs with how well that school matches your needs.
  • Consider outside sources of funding.
    • National Health Services Corps Scholarship Program: http://nhsc.bhpr.hrsa.gov/applications/
    • Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarships are available from each branch of the military.

12. What other factors should I consider?

  • Location. You will be spending 4 years of your life at medical school, so you want to make sure it’s an environment you like.
    • Where have you lived before and what did you like about those places? City vs. rural, different climates, cost of living, etc.
    • Consider international programs where appropriate.
  • Composition of Student Body. Do you prefer a smaller or a larger class? How diverse is the class? What is the male/female ratio?
  • Personal Factors. Are you close to your family and want to be at a school near them?

13. I want to apply to MD/PhD programs. How do I decide where to apply?

  • Consider what type of research you’re hoping to do and which faculty members you’d like to work with.
  • Look at the structure of the program.
    • Do you do 3 years of your MD and then do your PhD and finish your last year of medical school after that?
    • Or do you do your PhD first and then your MD?

14. I want to apply to osteopathic medical schools. How do I decide where to apply?

  • Utilize many of the same strategies as when applying to allopathic medical schools.
  • Ask yourself similar questions about your background, the school’s mission statement and curriculum, cost, location, etc.
  • Your best source of information about osteopathic medical schools is the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine: http://www.aacom.org/Pages/default.aspx
    • They publish an Osteopathic Medical College Information Book

Resources

  • Medical School Admission Requirements (MSAR)
    • Can be purchased online through the Association of American Medical Colleges (http://www.aamc.org) or at http://www.amazon.com
    • Source for:
      • Application procedures and deadlines
      • Selection factors such as MCAT & GPA data
      • Medical school class profiles
      • Costs and financial aid packages
      • MD/PhD and other combined degrees
      • Graduates’ specialty choices
      • Updated USMLE Policies
  • Association of American Medical Colleges Curriculum Guide
    • Free online resource: http://services.aamc.org/currdir/start.cfm
  • Princeton Review’s Searchable Medical School Database.
    • You can search for schools based on your GPA and MCAT score, geographic location, class size, and other factors. http://www.princetonreview.com/medical/research/advsearch/match.asp
  • US! Your Health Professions Advisors. 

Building Your School List

Questions?



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