Presentation by H. Allen Brizee; Adapted from Baker (2001)



Download 9,96 Kb.
Date conversion27.11.2016
Size9,96 Kb.
  • HATS - A Design Procedure for Routine Business
  • Use HATS to create documents that are easy to access, easy to navigate, easy to remember:
    • Headings – to promote easy navigation
    • Access – to promote the finding and understanding of information
    • Typography – to promote ease of reading and clear levels of information hierarchy
    • Space – to promote effective document design
  • HATS: Introduction
  • Readers need information quickly, so documents should ensure easy access to important information:
    • Writing should be clear and concise. But before audiences read words, they must access the document
    • Documents that are easy to access and understand are more persuasive and user-centered
  • Use HATS: Headings, Access, Typography, Space
  • HATS: Headings
  • Headings
    • Headings are navigation signposts in table of contents
    • Headings help guide readers through documents
    • Headings announce forthcoming information
  • Introduction
  • This report overviews the history of air pollution in greater Lafayette, Indiana, and it discusses our ideas for reducing air pollution.
  • Table of Contents
  • Introduction
  • Background
  • Problem
  • HATS: Headings (cont.)
    • Adequacy – Documents should have an ample number of headings to serve as navigation signposts
    • Hierarchy – Use typeface, size, style, and alignment to show different levels of importance and detail:
  • Background
  • This section outlines the history of air pollution in greater Lafayette…
  • The Early Years
  • During the industrial growth of the early twentieth century…
  • HATS: Access
  • Access
    • Readers should be able to find and understand important information easily
    • To ensure easy access of important information:
      • Use bullets or dashes, or for steps, use numbers. Note the architecture in this presentation
      • Use graphics such as tables, graphs, process charts, and photographs
  • HATS: Access (cont.)
    • Graphics – Think of yourself as an information designer not just a wordsmith. Here are some suggestions:
  • Information Type
  • Effective Presentation
  • Numeric
  • Tables, charts
  • People, objects
  • Pictures, line drawings
  • Processes
  • Flow charts
  • Geographic Data
  • Maps
  • Nonchronological lists
  • Bulleted lists
  • Numbered lists
  • HATS: Typography
  • Typography
    • Typeface has persuasive impact and can be changed to improve design
      • Avoid using more than two types of font in one document
      • Make sure you can read all the text against the background
      • Unless instructed otherwise, left-justify your body text
  • HATS: Typography (cont.)
  • Typography Continued: Fonts
      • Use Times New Roman for body text
      • Use Arial or other sans serif fonts such as Franklin Gothic Book for headings.
      • Avoid unusual fonts such as Hobo Std for professional documents
      • Use 10 or 12 point font for body text.
      • For headings, bold the text or use a different font; bolding and underlining is overkill
  • HATS: Space
  • Space
    • Use plenty of space so you don’t overwhelm readers
      • Ensure that appropriate top, bottom, left, and right space margins frame the elements on a page (1 inch margin is good)
      • Allow for space around visuals rather than using frames, unless an edge of your visual bleeds into the white space of the page
      • Do not crowd your words. Trust your eyes when you step back to view your page at a distance
      • Use this presentation to guide you. Your documents should be visually effective, and they should contain good content
  • Here is an overview of how pages look from a distance:
  • HATS: Space (cont.)
  • HATS: Space (con’t.)
  • Design – The first thing readers see is the design of your document. If your document does not look professional and effective, your ethos will suffer.
    • Use the elements of design outlined in this presentation:
    • Colors – Make sure colors work well together
      • Avoid combinations such as yellow-orange, black-purple
      • Consider cultural expectations and color blind readers
      • Colors on monitors and colors on paper look different
      • Consider that you may not have access to a color printer, so design documents that look good in black and white

Shapes – Avoid awkward shapes or shapes that do not work well together

      • Shapes – Avoid awkward shapes or shapes that do not work well together
        • Spheres, see below, can work well in documents
        • Always look at your document from a distance; turn it upside down, tilt it. Do the shapes conflict?
  • HATS: Space (cont.)
  • HATS: Space (cont.)
  • Placement – Cultures reading from left to right move in the Z pattern as they read down a page
    • Place visuals and text accordingly, with the most important information in upper left and bottom right areas
  • Contrast – Allow for contrast on your page
    • Do not place a line of circles on the same plane on a page; place visuals and text using the Z pattern so that you create an effective contrast
  • Balance – Balance your pages and make sure that your eye is not drawn to any area of the page unintentionally
    • How is your page going to be viewed? By itself, opposite another page?
    • Do the two pages work well together?
  • Z pattern
  • Contrast: circles aren’t on same plane
  • Balance: page is balanced
  • HATS: Space (cont.)
  • HATS: Recap
  • To Recap – Ask these questions when using HATS:
  • Headings – Are there enough headings? Do they reflect a clear hierarchy?
  • Access – Is important information easy to find? Is the information easy to digest? Does the method of presentation enhance readability and clarity?
  • Typography – Does the document use the most appropriate typefaces, size, styles, and alignment for both body text and headings?
  • Space – Does the document have appropriate white space to make it inviting and easy to read?
  • The End
  • HATS - A Design Procedure for Routine Business
  • Presentation by H. Allen Brizee;
  • Adapted from Baker (2001)
  • Brought to you in cooperation with the Purdue Online Writing Lab


The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2016
send message

    Main page