Preparing for the california high school exit examination cahsee please Take Notes dates to remember



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PREPARING FOR THE CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL EXIT EXAMINATION CAHSEE Please Take Notes

DATES TO REMEMBER

  • NOVEMBER 8 - ELA MOCK CAHSEE
    • 8:00 – 11:20
    • LARGE GYM
  • NOVEMBER 9 – MATH MOCK CAHSEE
    • 8:00 – 11:20
    • LARGE GYM
  • MARCH 12 – ELA CAHSEE 1OTH GRADE CENSUS
  • MARCH 13 – MATH CAHSEE 10TH GRADE CENSUS

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

The following questions are often asked about the California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE). If you have a question that is not answered here, call your high school’s principal or your school district’s testing office. You can find answers to other frequently asked questions on CDE’s CAHSEE Web site, http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg hs.

What does the CAHSEE cover?

  • The CAHSEE has two parts: English-language arts and mathematics.
  • The English-language arts part of the CAHSEE tests state content standards through grade ten.
  • The reading section includes vocabulary, decoding, comprehension, and analysis of informational and literary texts.

The writing section covers writing strategies, applications, and the conventions of standard English (for example, grammar, spelling, and punctuation).

  • The writing section covers writing strategies, applications, and the conventions of standard English (for example, grammar, spelling, and punctuation).
  • The mathematics part of the CAHSEE tests state content standards in grades six and seven and Algebra I.
  • The exam includes statistics, data analysis and probability, number sense, measurement and geometry, mathematical reasoning and algebra.

Students are also asked to demonstrate a strong foundation in computation and arithmetic, including working with decimals, fractions, and percentages.

  • Students are also asked to demonstrate a strong foundation in computation and arithmetic, including working with decimals, fractions, and percentages.

What kinds of questions are on the CAHSEE?

  • Most of the questions on the CAHSEE are multiple choice.
  • However, the English language arts part of the exam also includes one essay question (writing task).
  • The exam is given only in English, and all students must pass the exam in English to receive a high school diploma.

Released questions from previous administrations of the CAHSEE can be found throughout this guide and on CDE’s Web site.

  • Released questions from previous administrations of the CAHSEE can be found throughout this guide and on CDE’s Web site.

When do students first take the CAHSEE?

  • Students must take the exam for the first time in the second part of their tenth grade year.

When (and how) do students find out whether they have passed the CAHSEE?

  • School district receive student score reports about seven weeks after the date of the exam.
  • One copy is to be mailed to the student’s home and another copy is to be kept in the student’s permanent record.

It is important that parents or guardians keep a copy of the student report for their records.

  • It is important that parents or guardians keep a copy of the student report for their records.
  • The State of California does not keep a copy of the scores.
  • All individual student scores are confidential.
  • Only group scores (for entire schools and districts) are made public.
  • Scores may range from 275 to 450.
  • Passing score is 350 or higher.

What if a student does not pass the first time?

  • Students who do not pass the exam in the tenth grade will have several opportunities to take it again during their junior and senior years.
  • Once they have passed either part of the exam, they will not be tested again on that part.

By state law, students who do not pass a part of the exam must be offered extra instruction to learn what they need to know in order to pass.

  • By state law, students who do not pass a part of the exam must be offered extra instruction to learn what they need to know in order to pass.
  • It is up to each school and district to decide how to provide this instruction.
  • To find out what type of help is available and when the exam will be given again at your school, contact the principal or a counselor at your high school.

CAHSEE Fact Sheet

  • California High School Exit Exam
  • Everyone must pass the CAHSEE to graduate.
  • The first time a student takes it is in the 10th grade.
  • A passing score is 350.
  • A proficient score is 380.
  • There are 2 subjects: English and Math.

English section has 79 multiple-choice questions (72 are scored) and 1 writing task.

  • English section has 79 multiple-choice questions (72 are scored) and 1 writing task.
  • Math section has 92 multiple-choice. questions (only 80 are scored).
  • The first opportunity to take it is in the 10th grade – March.

English Section

  • There are total of 79 multiple-choice questions (72 questions are scored; 7 questions are not scored)
  • 1 Essay Writing Question

Breakdown of the English Section

  • Word Analysis (7 questions)
  • Reading Comprehension (18 questions)
  • Literary Response and Analysis (20 questions)
  • Writing Strategies (12 questions)
  • Writing conventions (15 questions)
    • THIS EQUALS 72 POINTS
  • Writing Applications (1 essay worth 18 points)
    • THIS EQUALS 90 POINTS.

Scores for English www.ets.org.cahsee

  • To pass this exam or get a score of 350 students need to get 66% of the questions correct.
    • That equals to about 59 points.
  • To get PROFICIENT or score of 380
    • Students need to get about 70 points
  • To get ADVANCED or score of 400
    • Students need to get about 77 points
  • To get PERFECT or a score of 450
    • Students need to get 90 points.

MATH SECTION

  • There are total of 92 multiple-choice questions
    • 80 questions are scored – 12 questions are not scored.

Breakdown of the math Section

  • Number Sense (12 questions)
  • Statistics, Data Analysis (12 questions)
  • Measurement and Geometry (17 questions)
  • Algebra and Functions (17 questions)
  • Mathematical Reasoning (8 questions)
  • Algebra 1 (12 questions)
  • Research Questions (12 questions – not scored) 92 Questions

Scores for Math www.ets.org/cahsee

  • To pass this exam or get a score of 350
    • Students need to get about 45 points
  • to get PROFICIENT or a score of 380
    • Students need to get about 57 points
  • To get a score of 400
    • Students need to get about 67 points
  • To get a PERFECT or score of 450
    • Students need to get 80 points.

WRITING TASK Please Copy Prompt

You belong to a science club that is very concerned about the potential connection between human activity and global warming. The club decides to address this concern by urging students to take steps to conserve energy in their daily lives.

Write a persuasive essay for your school paper in which you convince readers of the importance of taking action to decrease energy usage. Convince your readers through the use of specific reasons and examples.

STEP ONE

  • ANALYZE TASK
  • Is it a persuasive essay, discussion, expository, narrative?
  • Do you explain, argue, convince, et cetera?
  • This determines the type of essay and your writing style.

STEP TWO

  • BRAINSTORM – WRITE DOWN A LIST OF YOUR IDEAS RELATED TO THE TOPIC.
  • OUTLINE
  • What points do you need to include? (This is from READING THE PROMPT)
    • Connection between human activity and global warming (Read first paragraph).

Club decides to address this concern

    • Club decides to address this concern
    • Club urges students to TAKE STEPS (PERSUADE) to conserve energy in their daily lives
    • **Ways to conserve energy in daily life – (suggestions….)
      • Walk to school, not drive; skate board; any eco-friendly form of transportation
      • Save paper (recycle); do not use plastic bags
      • Take the bus, train
      • Unplug any power outlets when not needed
      • Go outside and play instead of using electronics

**Reasons these “ways” will help (EXPLAIN convince audience, more detail, examples)

    • **Reasons these “ways” will help (EXPLAIN convince audience, more detail, examples)
  • CONCLUSION/SUMMARY – How will you summarize (wrap up) what you just wrote about.

STEP THREE

  • BEGIN TO WRITE your essay
  • *** YOU MAY USE THIS AS YOUR FIRST SENTENCE:
  • As students, we need to take action to decrease energy use in our country.
  • Three to Four Paragraphs Minimum

Writing for Assessment Responding to Persuasive Prompts TAKE NOTES Copy Blue Prints ONLY

Throughout your lifetime, you will have many opportunities to persuade others to agree with you.

  • Throughout your lifetime, you will have many opportunities to persuade others to agree with you.
  • Perhaps you’ll try to convince a friend to see a certain movie, as a teacher to let you take a makeup exam, or persuade your parents to give you certain privileges.
  • The art of persuasion can be learned.
  • The best arguments are carefully thought out and well structured.
  • They are designed to make your audience think like you do on an issue.

You may be asked to respond to a persuasive prompt on a writing test.

  • You may be asked to respond to a persuasive prompt on a writing test.
  • Within time limits, you must structure your argument and arrange it in a logical way.
  • This chapter will show you how to use the writing process to create a clear, persuasive response.
  • OBJECTIVES
    • Apply what has been learned about persuasive writing
    • Practice writing for assessment

Prewriting ★Analyze a persuasive prompt.

  • Before you respond to a prompt, you must analyze it to be sure that your response will fit the requirements of the test.
  • One way to analyze a prompt is to answer the following STRAP questions about it:

STRAP questions

  • SUBJECT
    • What topic (lockers, policy, decision, program) should I write about?
  • TYPE
    • What form (essay, letter, editorial, article, report) of writing should I create?
  • ROLE
    • What position (student, son or daughter, friend, employee) should I assume as the writer?

AUDIENCE

  • AUDIENCE
    • Who (teacher, principal, parents, classmates, employer) is the intended reader?
  • PURPOSE
    • What is the goal (persuade, respond, evaluate, explain, tell, describe) of my writing?

The following key words are often found in persuasive prompts: convince, argue, defend, persuade.

Try it!

Analyze these prompts by answering the STRAP questions.

COPY The school board has decided to eliminate the school art program because of budget constraints. Write a letter arguing for or against the board’s decision.

  • SUBJECT
  • TYPE
  • ROLE
  • AUDIENCE
  • PURPOSE

The principal has reduced the number of school assemblies for the year. The school newspaper editor wants you to write about the decision. Write an editorial either defending the decision or urging the principal to reconsider.

  • SUBJECT
  • TYPE
  • ROLE
  • AUDIENCE
  • PURPOSE

To promote literacy, the city library is starting a new reading program pairing teens with younger children. Write a newspaper article calling for teens to volunteer for the program.

  • SUBJECT
  • TYPE
  • ROLE
  • AUDIENCE
  • PURPOSE

Plan your response Once you have answered the STRAP questions, you should quickly plan your persuasive response. The following graphic organizers can help you.

T - Bar

  • Pro
  • Con

Quick List

  • First Point
    • Pro
    • Con
  • Second Point
    • Pro
    • Con
  • Third Point
    • Pro
    • Con

Cluster (arguments for and against)

  • Topic
  • For
  • Against
  • Topic
  • Topic
  • Topic
  • Topic
  • Topic

Counter an opposing point of view

  • Each persuasive graphic organizer includes space for both pro and con arguments.
  • You must consider points from both sides of an issue to see where your strongest argument lies.
  • Facts usually make the strongest arguments; however, your strong feelings about the issue can be important, too.

When planning your persuasive writing, make sure to counter or address at least one opposing point of view.

  • When planning your persuasive writing, make sure to counter or address at least one opposing point of view.
  • Presenting another opinion tells your reader that you have carefully examines the issue.
  • And effectively countering the point can actually strengthen your overall argument.

Fact versus Opinion

  • A fact is a statement that can be proved by checking a reliable source.
  • An opinion is a statement that expresses the beliefs of a writer (or speaker).
  • An opinion cannot be proved or checked.

CAUTION!

  • Caution must be taken against stating an opinion as a fact, for example:
  • The after-school teen center prevents teens from committing crimes.
  • The writer believes that the after-school teen center will keep teens off the street and prevent them from committing petty crimes.

This is the writer’s opinion, stated as a fact.

  • This is the writer’s opinion, stated as a fact.
  • Rewrite the statement as an opinion.
    • I believe that the center prevents teens from committing crimes.

Writing Respond to a prompt.

Sample Persuasive Prompt Your school board is considering funding an after-school student center, but some board members feel it is a waste of funds. Write a letter to the board arguing for or against the center, explaining the benefits it will provide or the problems it could create for students, parents, and the community.

Sample Response

Dear School Board Members: If student are not involved in after-school activities or do not have a job, they may face long afternoons after the final bell rings. Many parents work until 5:00 or later in the evening. Students with time on their hands often look for something to do. Without guidance, they often get into trouble. At the very least, they might just go home and flop in front of the TV. An after-school teen center could create a positive environment for teens.

  • BEGINNING
  • The beginning paragraph states the opinion
  • (in blue)

A teen center provides a supervised place for students. In a teen center, adults are always available to make sure nothing inappropriate happens. Students can be with friends in a safe, supervised atmosphere.

  • MIDDLE
  • Each middle paragraph presents a main supporting point.

A properly equipped teen center offers a positive place for students, lots of activities, and healthy snacks. Students are encouraged to engage in physical activity. Sports are usually part of a center as well. With a few simple pieces of equipment, students can engage in activities such as table tennis, weight training, or aerobics. If the center has space outside, a basketball hoop or volleyball court encourages physical activity in good weather. An indoor gym could give students a place to be active even in bad weather.

Some people might argue that the district can’t afford such a facility, but there are ways to make an expensive dream an affordable reality. For one thing, the center could sell snacks and juices to help with expenses. The upper-class students could volunteer to help younger students with class work, earning volunteer service hours for their efforts. Local businesspeople might be willing to mentor students in different areas, working with them at the center. Another resource might be parents. Service organizations could donate materials to help support such a worthy community project. Of course, fund-raisers could be held to support the center.

  • CONCESSION
  • The writer addresses a possible objection.

I urge all the school board members to consider the importance of a teen center. The youth of today are the parents and citizens of tomorrow. Through a teen center that offers safe, supervised activities and homework tutoring, you could show us how a community can work together for the betterment of all. Sincerely Alia Santos

  • ENDING
  • The ending offers a final plea and summarizes the argument.

You belong to a science club that is very concerned about the potential connection between human activity and global warming. The club decides to address this concern by urging students to take steps to conserve energy in their daily lives. Write a persuasive essay for your school paper in which you convince readers of the importance of taking action to decrease energy usage. Convince your readers through the use of specific reasons and examples.

SUBJECT What topic (lockers, policy, decision, program) should I write about? TYPE What form (essay, letter, editorial, article, report) of writing should I create? ROLE What position (student, son or daughter, friend, employee) should I assume as the writer? AUDIENCE Who (teacher, principal, parents, classmates, employer) is the intended reader? PURPOSE What is the goal (persuade, respond, evaluate, explain, tell, describe) of my writing

  • SUBJECT
  • TYPE
  • ROLE
  • AUDIENCE
  • PURPOSE

Quick List

  • First Point
    • Pro
    • Con
  • Second Point
    • Pro
    • Con
  • Third Point
    • Pro
    • Con

Cluster (arguments for and against)

  • Topic
  • For
  • Against
  • Topic
  • Topic
  • Topic
  • Topic
  • Topic

Write a persuasive essay expressing your views on whether the technological devices in “There Will Come Soft Rains” could improve people’s lives. Cite evidence to support your arguments.

Mid-Term Examination Due on TODAY, October 8, 2012 PEER EDIT RE-WRITE SECOND DRAFT Double-Spaced

TECHNOLOGY Some people believe that computer technology is revolutionizing our lives, schools, and work. Others feel that computer technology is bothersome, full of potential problems, and even a danger to our culture. Write a persuasive essay defending a side in this debate. Address your essay to an audience of the opposition. Be sure to address the opposition’s concerns adequately.

Revolutionizing our lives...

  • Changing our lives
  • Making our live better
  • Moving us forward
  • Making us more advanced technologically

Technology as bothersome...

  • Makes people fat
  • Makes people lazy
  • Makes people stupid (they don’t study any more)
  • We have no more future – people will not pay attention to the past
  • SUBJECT
  • Technology
  • TYPE
  • Persuasive
  • ROLE
  • Student
  • AUDIENCE
  • Opposition
  • PURPOSE
  • Convince the opposition

T - Bar

  • Pro
  • Benefits
    • Computer
    • Phone
    • Transportation
    • Communication
    • Education
  • Con
  • Breaks families
  • Mess up people’s minds

Paragraph One

  • Begin your paragraph with one of the following:
    • A question
    • A quotation from a famous person
    • Address your audience directly
    • Tell an amusing anecdote
    • Open with a startling fact or statistic
  • Reveal your positions (pro or con)
  • End with a thesis statement.

The Body Paragraphs A paragraph has three main parts.

  • The topic sentence introduces your point.
  • The body sentences support you point.
  • The closing sentence completes your point.

Ending Paragraph

  • Revisit your thesis
  • Reflect on the importance of your points.


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