Poetry/Literary Analysis Essay Terms Title



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Poetry/Literary Analysis Essay Terms
Title: Every essay that you write should have a title. The title should give the reader a clear idea about the topic of your essay. A title should be tailored to your subject; it shouldn’t be too vague. It often mentions the author’s name and text title.

  • Physical Beauty (too vague – What subject is being discussed? What text is being used?)

  • Obsession with Physical Beauty in Rossetti’s “In an Artist’s Studio” (better)

  • Fantasy versus Reality in Rossetti’s “In an Artist’s Studio” (better)


Attention Grabber: A sentence that grabs your reader’s attention and makes her want to read your paper/essay/paragraph.


  • Question

  • Quotation (REMEMBER: Quotations can’t stand alone. They must be accompanied by an independent clause or an introductory phrase. The sentences must also include proper punctuation and quotation marks.)

    • “The ability to see beauty is the beginning of our moral sensibility. What we believe is beautiful we will not wantonly destroy.” Reverend Sean Parker Dennison (incorrect)

    • According to Reverend Sean Parker Dennison, “The ability to see beauty is the beginning of our moral sensibility. What we believe is beautiful we will not wantonly destroy.” (better – introductory phrase)

    • “The ability to see beauty is the beginning of our moral sensibility. What we believe is beautiful we will not wantonly destroy,” Reverend Sean Parker Dennison maintains. (better – independent clause)

  • Startling or shocking statement

  • A general observation about life that’s related to the topic


Context Sentences: Sentences that provide the reader with background information about the essay’s topic or briefly summarize the text(s) discussed in the essay. Context sentences set up the reader for the thesis statement. They come after the attention grabber but before the thesis statement.
Thesis Statement: The main idea that you are arguing in your paper; it consists of a claim (what you are trying to prove) and reasons (the points that support your argument; they must be proved by the text.)
Try the following pattern to help you develop a thesis statement:
All the stuff in my essay will prove that…

In __________________ (possessive form of the author’s name) novel/poem/play/ short story _________________ (title of the text), _______________ (claim – usually the theme you’re trying to prove) because _________________, ___________________, and __________________________three reasons).


OR
In the novel/poem/play/ short story _________________ (title of the work), _______________(author’s name) uses _____________________, _______________________, and _______________________ (literary devices) to demonstrate (claim – usually the theme you’re trying to prove).
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Topic Sentence: The beginning sentence of your body paragraph; it should give the a clear idea about the main idea that will be discussed in the paragraph; you will probably need to include a transition word or transition sentence before the topic sentence.
Evidence: Proof from the text that supports your opinions, such as quotations or paraphrases. You must list line numbers or page numbers. Remember to acknowledge the author if you’re incorporating evidence from a literary critic’s work.
Explanation of Evidence: What the quotation or paraphrase means in your own words.
So what? Statement: An explanation that tells the reader why the evidence is so important; it ties the reason, evidence, and explanation of evidence back to the thesis statement.
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Conclusion: Restates your major points in a fresh, new way. Then it leaves the reader with something interesting to think about. You will probably need to include a transition word or transition sentence at the beginning of the conclusion.
The final sentence(s) of your conclusion could…



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