Philip schaff, D. D., LL. D., Professor in the union theological seminary, new york. In connection with a number of patristic scholars of europe and america



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induti” (see Sabat.); but the text of the Fathers is often involuntarily conformed to the Vulgate.

5151 2 Cor. v. 3.

11 Rom. x. 14.

22 Sententiarum.

33 Ps. xviii. 5, Sept. (xix. 4, English version).

44 Matt. vi. 9.

55 Matt. vi. 9.

66 Matt. vi. 10.

77 Matt. vi. 10.

88 Matt. vi. 11.

99 Exhibitionem.

1010 Ructuant.

1111 Ps. lxxxiv. 4.

1212 Matt. vi. 12.

1313 Matt. vi. 13.

11 Salvatorem.

22 Convivio.

33 Gen. i. 27.

44 Detrivimus.

55 St. Ambrose, ad loc., observes that Dei is not in the Greek but explains “in imagine” in the same sense, as does St. Augustin, ad loc., where he had not “Dei.” It seems a sort of gloss. It occurs in Cassiod. Anon. de Trin. ap. St. Ambrose.

66 Ps. xxxviii. 7, Sept. (xxxix. 6, English version).

77 Fides.

88 Ps. lxii. 10.

99 Pietas.

1010 Fluendo.

1111 Paenaliter.

1212 1 Cor. i. 23, 24.

1313 Argumenta.

1414 Ore torto.

1515 Matt. vi. 19–21.

1616 Gen. iii. 19, Sept.

1717 From this and the preceding sections it would appear as if this Sermon was written at a time of some great public trouble, probably when the barbarians were ravaging Africa.

1818 Matt. xxiv. 35.

1919 Matt. vi. 19.

2020 Matt. xix. 21.

2121 In terra.

2222 Matt. vi. 21.

2323 Vide Sermon 18. 4, and Sermon 38. 9.

2424 Laturarii.

2525 Matt. xxv. 34, etc.

2626 Ps. xxxiv. 14.

2727 Ecclus. iii. 30.

2828 Ecclus. xxix. 12, Vulgate.

2929 Dan. iv. 24, Sept. (iv. 27, English version).

3030 Wisd. iv. 20.

3131 Matt. v. 7.

3232 Jas. ii. 13.

3333 John vi. 35.

3434 Ps. xv. 2, Sept. (xvi. 2, English version).

3535 Matt. xxv. 35, etc.

3636 Luke iii. 7, etc.

3737 Mereri.

3838 Ecclus. xxi. 1.

3939 Luke vi. 37, 38.

11 Matt. vii. 7–10.

22 Luke xi. 12.

33 Matt. vii. 11.

44 Luke xviii. 19.

55 Jer. xvii. 14.

66 Pelagians.

77 Eccles. vii. 29.

88 Morbo.

99 Ps. cxii. 9.

1010 Matt. vii. 8.

1111 Luke xviii. 2.

1212 Beneficio.

1313 Luke xi. 5, etc.

1414 Commendat.

1515 Luke xviii. 1

1616 Matt. v. 6.

1717 1 Tim. vi. 7.

1818 Tim. vi. 8–10.

1919 Video facultates non interrogo voluptates.

2020 1 Tim. vi. 17.

2121 Sermon 35 (85, Bened.) 3.

2222 Vitium.

2323 1 Tim. vi. 18, Vulgate.

2424 I Tim. vi. 19.

2525 Veram, Vulgate.

2626 Eccles. i. 2, 3, Sept.

2727 Possessio.

2828 Accendit.

11 Matt. viii. 8.

22 Luke vii. 36.

33 Luke ix. 58.

44 Luke ix. 57.

55 Matt. viii. 20.

66 Luke ix. 59.

77 Luke xix. 6.

88 Matt. viii. 8.

99 Matt. viii. 10.

1010 Matt. viii. 9.

1111 Ps. xvii. 44, 45, Sept. (xviii. 43, 44, English version).

1212 Luke viii. 45.

1313 Col. i. 24.

1414 1 Cor. xii. 27.

1515 Matt. viii. 11.

1616 Potus.

1717 Praesentato.

1818 1 Cor. xv. 9.

1919 Sainte.

2020 1 Cor. iv. 11.

2121 1 Cor. viii. 10, 11.

2222 1 Cor. viii. 12.

2323 Ps. xlv. 10.

2424 Luxurias.

2525 Cilicium.

2626 Mensae.

2727 1 Cor. xv. 33.

2828 1 Cor. viii. 10.

2929 Rom. ix. 5.

3030 1 Cor. x. 20.

3131 1 Cor. v. 12.

3232 Blandiendum.

3333 Wisd. iii. 6.

3434 Rom. xiii. 1, 2.

3535 Curator.

3636 Eph. vi. 16.

3737 Ps. li. 4, Sept. (lii. 2, English version).

3838 Matt. x. 30.

3939 Luke xxi. 18.

4040 By the Donatists called Agonistici (St. Augustin, In Ps. 133. 6), and by the Catholics Circilliones, or Circumcelliones, that is, Vagrants. Circumcelliones dicti sunt, quia circum cellas vagantur, solent enim ire hac illac nusquam habentes pedes (In Ps. 132. 3). They were of a very licentious and abandoned character, and in their fanaticism they would often commit suicide, to which the text may suppose to refer (Lib. de Haeres. c. 69; Brev. Coll. cum Donant. viii. [14] ). They exercised extreme cruelty against the Catholics (Cont. Cresc. Don. lib. 3, xliii. [47], xlvi. [50]). Their form of salutation was Deo laudes (Cont. lit. Petil. lib. 2, lxv. [146]), which St. Augustin (In Ps. 133, 6) says was more feared than the roaring of a lion. For the time of their origin see Opt. lib. 3.

4141 A place where St. Cyprian’s body was buried outside the walls of Carthage. Macrius in his Hierolexicon (ad verb) thinks it ought to be written Mapalia, i.e. domus rurales.

4242 Deut. vii. 1 and xii. 3.

4343 This refers doubtless to the laws against the Donatists. The Emperor Honorius issued an edict against them A.D. 405, and another A.D. 410, and A.D. 412, and again A.D 414, on occasion of the death of Marcellinus, and to prevent and advantage which the Donatists might derive from his death. For he had been judge in the conference between the Catholics and Donatists, granted by the Emperor at the request of the deputies of the council of Carthage, four years before (Fleury, H. E. B. xxii., cxxvi.): and to him had been entrusted the execution of the laws issued against the Donatists for the maintenance of the Catholic religion.

4444 Isa. lviii. 7.

11 Eph. iii. 17.

22 Sacramenti.

33 Luke xxiii. 34.

44 Luke vi. 37, 38.

55 Matt. viii. 27.

66 Ps. xcv. 5.

77 John i. 3.

88 For the the full form, see end of Sermon xvii. (lxvii. Bened.).

11 Matt. x. 16.

22 Matt. x. 16.

33 Securus.

44 Tunicam.

55 Matt. vii. 13.

66 Col. iii. 9; Eph. iv. 22–24.

77 John xiv. 6.

88 1 Cor. xi. 3.

99 Gemitibus amoris murmurant.

1010 2 Thess. iii. 14, 15.

1111 See, as to the excesses which prevailed at the festivals of the Martyrs, a letter of St. Augustin to Aurelius Bishop of Carthage and Primate of Africa (Ep. 22, al. 64), urging him to use his authority to suppress them. St Ambrose had prohibited these feasts in the Church of Milan (Augustin, Conf. lib. 6. 2 [Am. edition i. 90, note]). Aurelius succeeded in getting a canon (xxx.) made in the third Council of Carthage (A.D. 397), obliging the clergy to abstain from all such feasts in the Church, and as far as in them lay to restrain the people from the same practice (Conc. Labbe, t. 2, p. 1171; Bingham, B. xx. vii. § 10).

1212 Ebrietate ventris.

11 Matt. x. 28.

22 Prov. xiv. 26, Sept.

33 I Tim. vi. 16.

44 1 Tim. v. 6.

55 Wisd. i. 11.

66 Ecclus. xxii. 12.

77 Isa. xxvi. 10, Sept.

88 Merebitur.

99 Meruerunt.

11 Officium.

22 John i. 27.

33 John i. 16.

44 Matt. xi. 7.

55 Eph. iv. 14.

66 Matt. xi. 8.

77 Matt. xi. 9.

88 John i. 29.

99 Matt. xi. 11.

1010 He gives these two interpretations of this passage; again Cont. adv. leg. and Prop. ii. 5 (20).

1111 Commendavit.

1212 Matt. xi. 3.

1313 Matt. xi. 10.

1414 Matt. xi. 4–7.

1515 Matt. xi. 4–7.

1616 Quadrigam.

11 Matt. xi. 25.

22 Interim.

33 Vocem.

44 Ecclus. xvii. 28, Sept.

55 Phil. ii. 9.

66 John ii. 19.

77 John xi. 17.

88 Ps. xiv. 1.

99 John xi. 43.

1010 Matt. xvi. 19 and xviii. 18.

1111 Vid. Serm. 48 (98, Bened.) 6.

1212 John xi. 44.

1313 Circumveniat.

1414 Eph. vi. 12.

1515 John xiii. 2.

1616 Eph. iv. 27.

1717 Vulgate.

1818 Eph. v. 8.

1919 1 Cor. iv. 7.

2020 Ps. xvii. 4, Sept. (xviii. 3, English version).

2121 Ps. xlix. 23, Sept. (l. English version).

2222 Ps. cxxxix. 6, Sept. (cxl. 5, English version).

2323 Gal. vi. 3, Vulg.

2424 Ipsius.

2525 It was the doctrine of Paul of Samosata, that the man Christ was exalted to be the Son of God (prokoph,from Luke ii. 52), as if by merit. Origen seems to hold the same, at least as regards the (supposed) pre-existent soul of Christ (vid. Huet. Origen, ii. 3. § 6; vid. however De la Rue’s note); and the Arians, at least implicitly (Socr. Hist. i. 6, Athan. Orat. contr. Arian, i. 35, iii. 51; and Leporius, Cassian. Incarn. i. 3, 4). The same heresy was imputed to the Nestorians (but falsely according to Garner, in Mar. Merc. pt. i. p. 431), and thereby connected them with the Pelagians, as if unassisted human nature could merit grace. The Church on the other hand, proceeding from Rom. i. 4, taught that the human nature which became the manhood of the Word was predestined to be such by grace before its creation, and became such in the moment of creation. St. Athanasius touches on this subject against the Arians (Orat. i. 46); St. Augustin enlarges on it against the Pelagians (De Praedest. Sanct. 23, 30; De Corrept. et Grat. 30): St. Cyril, against the Nestorians (Contra Nest. iii. p. 83); Vigilius, against the Monophysites (Contra Eutych. v. B. P. t. 4, p. 528, ed. 1624). When St. Augustin says “that man,” he is speaking of our Lord’s human nature as abstracted from that Divine Person in whom it actually existed, and not as if it ever existed as a separate hypostasis, This use of “homo” and aŸnqrwpo" is very frequent with the Fathers; what is more startling is the expression “homo ille,” yet vid. also Augustin, De Praed. Sanct. 30; Alcuim, De Trin. iii. i; Agobard, Cont. Felic. B. P. t. 9, p. 1194. However, this point is a subject of debate among theologians (vid. Petav. De Incarn. xi. fin.).

2626 Meruit.

2727 Praesumpsit.

2828 Luke xxiii. 42.

2929 Matt. xi. 25.

3030 Rom. i. 22.

3131 Rom. i. 21.

3232 Ps. xviii. 28.

3333 John i. 8.

3434 John i. 16.

3535 John v. 33, etc.

3636 Ps. xviii. 3.

11 Matt. xi. 25.

22 1 Cor. i. 20.

33 Sublimiter eminet.

44 Wisd. xiii. 9.

55 Itinera.

66 Vid. Conf. v. 3 (4).

77 Numeros.

88 Rom. i. 18.

99 Rom. i. 19.

1010 Rom. i. 20.

1111 Faucibus.

1212 Ructuaverunt.

1313 Vid. Conf. vii. 9 (13–15).

1414 Acts xvii. 28.

1515 Humilius apprehendendo.

1616 Isa. lxvi. 2.

1717 Matt. v. 45.

1818 Matt. xi. 27.

11 Matt. xi. 25–27.

22 Matt. xi. 28.

33 Spatia.

44 Matt. xi. 29.

55 Ps. xciii. 9, Sept. (xciv. English version).

66 Ps. xciii. 8, Sept. (xciv. English version).

77 Ps. xiv. 1.

88 Rom. iv. 17.

99 Ps. cxxxix. 8.

1010 De proximo.

1111 Jer. xxiii. 24.

1212 Praesume.

1313 Familiarius.

1414 John i. 48.

1515 Gen. iii. 7.

1616 Rom. viii. 3.

1717 Sublimiter.

11 Matt. xi. 28–30.

22 2 Tim. iii. 12.

33 Matt. xx. 4.

44 2 Cor. vi. 4.

55 2 Cor. xi. 24, etc.

66 Numeros.

77 Rom. viii. 18.

88 Ps. xvi. 4, Sept. (xvii. English version).

99
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