Philip schaff, D. D., LL. D., Professor in the union theological seminary, new york. In connection with a number of patristic scholars of europe and america



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e.g., chaps. xi. 14-xiii. 19). There are also peculiar difficulties connected with the chronology of John x. and xi.—R.]

455455 Matt. xix. 1–12.

456456 Gen. ii. 24.

457457 Matt. xix. 13-xx. 16.

458458 Mark x. 13–31.

459459 Luke ix. 46–51.

460460 [Compare note on § 120.—R.]

461461 Luke xviii. 18–30.

462462 The Latin version is followed here. In Matt. xix. 17, where the English version gives, “Why callest thou me good?” the Vulgate has, Quid me interrigas de bono? [The Revised Version text agrees with the Vulgate (in Matthew), following the most ancient Greek Mss. But the same authorities read “Master” instead of “good Master,” differing from the Vulgate. Augustin accepts the latter reading.—R.]

463463 Matt. xx. 17–28.

464464 Luke xviii. 31–35.

465465 Luke xxii. 24–27.

466466 Matt. xx. 29–34.

467467 Mark x. 46–52.

468468 See chap. xxiv. § 56.

469469 Mark v. 22–43.

470470 Luke xviii. 35–43.

471471 [Various other solutions are suggested. Comp. Robinson’s Greek Harmony, rev. ed. pp. 234, 235.—R.]

472472 Matt. xxi. 1–9.

473473 Mark xi. 1–10.

474474 Luke xix. 1–38.

475475 See above, chap. xlvi. § 98.

476476 John xii. 14, 15.

477477 [The reference here is to the story of Aristeas, to the effect that the translators, though separated, produced identical versions. Compare translator’s remark in Introductory Notice.—R.]

478478 Reading quae dicenda est, sermonibus per quos dicenda. The Ratisbon edition and twelve Mss. give in both instances discenda = to be learned, instead of dicenda = to be expressed. See Migne.

479479 Matt. xxi. 10–13; Mark xi. 15–17; Luke xix. 45, 46; John ii. 1–17.

480480 Unam.

481481 Matt. xxi. 14–22.

482482 Consequenter.

483483 Aiia die.

484484 Mark xi. 11–17.

485485 Matt. xxi. 17.

486486 Mark xi. 20, 21.

487487 [The explanation of Augustin is still accepted by many. But the order of Mark may be followed without any difficulty. The long discourses occurred on the third day, and the blasted condition of the fig-tree was first noticed on the morning of that day; these are the main points.—R.]

488488 Matt. xxi. 23–27.

489489 Mark xi. 27–33; Luke xix. 47-xx. 8.

490490 [The order of occurrences during this day of public controversy in the temple presents few difficulties. It was probably the Tuesday of Passion Week. The day of the month is in dispute because of the still mooted question, whether our Lord ate the last passover at the regular time or one day earlier.—R.]

491491 Matt. xxi. 28–44.

492492 Mark xii. 1–11; Luke xx. 9–18.

493493 Luke xx. 15–17.

494494 John xi. 49–51.

495495 Ps. cxviii. 26; Matt. xxi. 9.

496496 Keeping quia veritas est, for which the reading qui veritas est = “who is the truth,” also occurs.

497497 John iv. 1.

498498 1 Cor. xv. 6.

499499 Aiunt illi.

500500 Aiunt illi.

501501 That is to say, the aiunt illi is the rendering for levgousin aujtw`. [This reading of the Greek text is abundantly attested.—R.]

502502 Liberi eritis.

503503 John viii. 31–37.

504504 Matt. xxi. 45-xxii. 14.

505505 Luke xiv. 16–24.

506506 Mark xii. 12; Luke xx. 19.

507507 Matt. xxii. 15–33.

508508 Mark xii. 13–27; Luke xx. 20–40.

509509 Matt. xxii. 34–40.

510510 Another but evidently faulty reading is sometimes found here,—namely, Lucas autem hoc tacet et in fine Marcus, etc. = whereas Luke says nothing about that, and Mark tells us, etc.

511511 Minorabitur. Ecclus. xix. 4.

512512 Luke x. 25–37.

513513 Luke x. 29.

514514 Matt. xxii. 41–46.

515515 Mark xii. 35–37.

516516 Luke xx. 41–44.

517517 Matt. xxiii.

518518 Matt. xii. 39–46.

519519 Luke xi. 29–39.

520520 Luke xi. 40–52.

521521 In Matt. xxiii.

522522 Matt. xxiii. 39.

523523 Matt. xxi. 9.

524524 Luke xiii. 31–35.

525525 In claritate.

526526 Matt. xxiv. 1, 2. According to Migne, certain codices add here the clause, “when the disciples were asking the Lord privately what was the sign of His coming.”

527527 Mark xii. 41-xiii. 2.

528528 Luke xx. 16-xxi. 6.

529529 [Many harmonists insert at this point the events narrated in John xii. 20–50. Augustin does not express an opinion in regard to this passage.—R.]

530530 Matt. xxiv. 3-xxv. 46; Mark xiii. 4–37; Luke xxi. 7–36.

531531 Matt. xxiv. 14.

532532 Mark xiii. 10.

533533 Matt. xxiv. 15.

534534 Mark xiii. 14. [The Greek text of Mark, according to the best authorities, does not contain the phrase “spoken of by Daniel the prophet.” Augustin also omits the clause, but the Edinburgh edition inserts it, following the Authorized Version. It has therefore been stricken out in this edition.—R.]

535535 Luke xxi. 20.

536536 Matt. xxiv. 16–18.

537537 Luke xxi. 21.

538538 Luke xxi. 34–36.

539539 Matt. xxvi. 1, 2 [It cannot be determined with certainty how much time is to be included in the phrase “after two days.” Moreover, the difficulty in regard to the time of the Last Supper affects this question, to some extent at least.—R.]

540540 Mark xiv. 1; Luke xxii. 1.

541541 John xi. 55, xii. 1, xiii. 1.

542542 John xii. 1.

543543 John xi. 55.

544544 Ubi fuerat Lazarus mortuus quem suscitavit Jesus.

545545 John xii. 1, 2.

546546 Matt. xxvi. 2–5, 14, etc.

547547 Dicebant enim.

548548 Mark xiv. 1, 2, 10.

549549 [This view is rejected by Dr. Robinson in his Harmony, but accepted by many commentators. See Robinson’s Greek Harmony, rev. ed. pp. 236–238.—R.]

550550 Matt. xxvi. 3–13.

551551 Luke vii. 36–50. [This identification of Mary of Bethany with the woman spoken of by Luke is part of the process by which the latter is assumed to be Mary Magdalene. The occasions were different, and it is far more likely that there were two women, neither of them Mary Magdalene.—R.]

552552 John xi. 1, 2. [John’s language is more properly referred to what was well known among Christians when he wrote, than to what had occurred before the sickness of Lazarus.—R.]

553553 John xii. 1–8; Matt. xxvi. 3–13; Mark xiv. 3–9.

554554 See above, chap. xlvi. § 98.

555555 De alabastro fracto frangere conetur.

556556 See above, § 96.

557557 Matt. xxvi. 14–19.

558558 Mark xiv. 10–16; Luke xxii. 3–13.

559559 Matt. xxvi. 18.

560560 Patrem familias.

561561 Dominum domus.

562562 Ite in civitatem et dicite ei. Turning on the identity of form retained by the Latin pronoun in all the genders of the dative case, this, of course, cannot be precisely represented in English.

563563 Ad quemcunque aut ad quemlibet.

564564 Ad quendam.

565565 Lagenam, bottle.

566566 Amphoram, large measure.

567567 Matt. xxvi. 20–25.

568568 Mark xiv. 17–21; Luke xxii. 14–23; John xiii. 21–27.

569569 [No notice is taken by Augustin, in this treatise, of the most serious difficulty connected with the narratives of the Lord’s Supper; namely, that of the day of the month on which it was instituted. The Synoptists distinctly declare that our Lord ate the passover supper with His disciples at the regular time (Matt. xxvi. 17; Mark xiv. 12; Luke xxii. 7), but some passages in John (xiii. 1, 27–30; xviii. 28; xix. 31) seem to indicate that the proper time of its observance had not yet come. Hence many commentators think that the Lord’s Supper was instituted on the evening of the 13th of Nisan, one day before the regular time of the paschal supper.—R.]

11 The text gives: et in unam narrationem faciemque digeramus. For faciem the reading seriem, series,also occurs.

22 The text gives: ut aggrediamur narrationem omnia commemorantes, cum eorum evangeiistarum attestatione qui ex his omnibus, etc. Some editions have cum eorundem evangelistarum attestatione quid ex his, etc. = the attestation of the same evangelists as to what, etc.

33 Matt. xxvi. 26.

44 Mark xiv. 22; Luke xxii. 49.

55 [Luke’s first reference to the cup belongs to the passover celebration, in distinction from the Lord’s Supper.—R.]

66 John vi. 32–64.

77 John xiii. 21, 22.

88 Matt. xxvi. 22–25.

99 Mark xiv. 19–21.

1010 [This explanation seems altogether inadmissible, and is equally unnecessary.—R.]

1111 Luke xxii. 21, 22.

1212 Innuit ergo huic Simon Petrus et dixit ei.

1313 John xiii. 23–27. [Whether this preceded or followed the giving of the cup is still in dispute.—R.]

1414 John xiii. 2.

1515 John xx. 22.

1616 John xiii. 28–32.

1717 John xiii. 33–38.

1818 Matt. xxvi. 30–35; Mark xiv. 26–31; Luke xxii. 31–34.

1919 John xxi. 15–17.

2020 John xiii. 33–36.

2121 John xiii. 37.

2222 Luke xxii. 31–33.

2323 Matt. xxvi. 30–32.

2424 Mark xiv. 26–28.

2525 Matt. xxvi. 33–35. [It is very probable that the prediction of Peter’s denial was repeated, being first spoken in the upper room (Luke, John), and afterwards on the way to Gethsemane (Matthew, Mark)—R.]

2626 Mark xiv. 30. [The Latin reproduces the emphatic form of the Greek text: “That thou to-day, even this night, before the cock crow twice, shalt deny me thrice” (Revised Version). It seem probable that this is the most accurate report, derived from Peter himself.—R.]

2727 Reading quanta futura esset. Quando also occurs for quanta, in which case the sense would be = the period at which it was to take place.

2828 Adopting concepta est. There is another reading, coepta est = it was commenced.

2929 The text gives simply: ut rectius diligentiusque attendentibus. Migne states that in six Mss. videtur is added = it seems to those who consider the matter more correctly, etc.

3030 Matt. v. 28.

3131 The text gives eum. Another common reading is eam = it, i.e. his mind.

3232 John xiv. 1, 2.

3333 John xvii. 25, 26.

3434 Another reading is minor = as the less.

3535 Luke xxii. 24–30. [This incident may with more propriety be placed before the washing of the disciples’ feet.—R.]

3636 Luke xxii. 31–38. [The conversation in regard to the swords (vers. 35–38) probably preceded the discourse reported by John (xiv.-xvii.).—R.]

3737 Matt. xxvi. 30–35.

3838 Matt. xxvi. 36–46.

3939 Mark xiv. 32–42.

4040 Luke xxii. 39–46.

4141 John xviii. 1.

4242 [“Go yonder and pray;” so the Latin, as well as the Greek text. Comp. Revised Version, which in some other instances, in the passage here cited, agrees more closely with Augustin’s text than does the Authorized Version.—R.]

4343 Matt. xxvi. 36–46.

4444 Mark xiv. 41. [On the various explanations of this difficult passage, see commentaries.—R.]

4545 See Eph. ii. 11–22.

4646 Rom. viii. 15.

4747 Gal. iv. 6.

4848 Or = having compassion on the more infirm; infirmioribus compatiens.

4949 John x. 16.

5050 Matt. xxvi. 47–56; Mark xiv. 43–50.

5151 Luke xii. 48.

5252 John xviii. 4–9. |This passage is more naturally placed before the kissing by Judas.—R.]

5353 Luke xxii. 51.

5454 Matt. xxvi. 52–55.

5555 John xviii. 11.

5656 That is to say, while Christ’s answer to the disciples and Peter’s act might easily have been synchronous, the Lord could not have addressed Himself in different senses to two distinct parties at the same time, namely, to the persons who put the question, and to Peter.

5757 Matt. xxvi. 53.

5858 Luke xxii. 53.

5959 Mark xiv. 52.

6060 Matt. xxvi. 57.

6161 John xviii. 13.

6262 Mark xiv. 53; Luke xxii. 54.

6363 John xviii. 12.

6464 Matt. xxvi. 58.

6565 Mark xiv. 54.

6666 Luke xxii. 54, 55.

6767 John xviii. 15–18.

6868 [It is implied here that the denials of Peter took place in the house of Annas, and also that Matthew and Mark, in their account of the night examination, refer to the same event described by John (xviii. 19–23). The objection to this is found in the explicit statement of Matthew (xxvi. 57) in regard to Caiaphas.—R.]

6969 Matt. xxvi. 59, 60.

7070 Mark xiv. 56.

7171 Matt. xxvi. 61.

7272 Mark xiv. 57–59.

7373 Matt. xxvi. 62–64.

7474 Mark xiv. 62.

7575 Mark xiv. 62.

7676 Matt. xxvi. 65, 66.

7777 Matt. xxvi. 67, 68.

7878 Mark xiv. 65.

7979 [The evangelists indicate three distinct episodes of recognition and denial, but do not refer to the same facts in detail. This Augustin seems to apprehend.—R.]

8080 Matt. xxvi. 69–74.

8181 Mark xiv. 68–70.

8282 Luke xxii. 54–58.

8383 John xviii. 17.

8484 John xviii. 18.

8585 John xviii. 19–24.

8686 Luke iii. 2.

8787 Matt. xxviii. 57. [See note on § 19. Augustin’s Latin text in John xviii. 24, et misit eum, etc., agrees in tense with the Greek. The Authorized Version incorrectly renders, “Now Annas had sent,” etc. The Revised Version has, “Annas therefore sent,” The theory of two distinct night examinations (before Annas first, and then before Caiphas) agrees best with the literal sense. Both may have occupied parts of the same house.—R.]

8888 John xviii. 25.

8989 Matt. xxviii. 71.

9090 Mark xiv. 69.

9191 Mark xiv. 70–72.

9292 Luke xxii. 59, 60.

9393 John xviii. 26, 27.

9494 Matt. xxvi. 75.

9595 Mark xiv. 72: the words, “when he thought thereon,” being omitted. [There is nothing omitted. The difficult Greek term (ejpibalwvn) is explained by “when he thought thereon” in the Authorized Version. Augustin’s view is given in Revised Version margin, “And he began to weep.”—R.]

9696 Luke xxii. 61, 62.

9797 Matt. xxvi. 67, 68.

9898
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