Peer edit protocol



Download 22,57 Kb.
Date conversion03.05.2017
Size22,57 Kb.

PEER EDIT PROTOCOL

Fostering Proficiency, Consistency, and Independence

This strategy helps develop specific or targeted editing skills. It should lead to independence and facility with giving meaningful feedback to others. Students should have explicit instruction in the type of writing assigned and the opportunity to discuss main ideas, evidence, and other details before writing and peer editing. The annotated paper and/or the editing worksheet is a great formative assessment.

Writing Title or Assignment Topic___________________________________



AUTHOR ______________________________________________________PEER EDITOR __________________________________________________

It is important to have students read their papers aloud before handing it over. The editor should listen carefully and answer the following questions before looking at the paper. Substantive content feedback will be provided based on what is heard and discussed. You can have the author write comments or the editor record comments before reading the paper. A clean outline is provided later. Edits suggested during reading are primarily for correctness. During the listening portion, think about the writing and listening standards you may want to include.
Before you look at what is written, listen to the author reading it to you.

After the introduction:
State the main idea of the paper.Is it clearly stated in the first paragraph or is it implied? Can the listener identify the thesis and anticipate what will follow (or what should follow)? This assumes a familiarity with the topic on behalf of both author and editor. NOTE: A thesis statement doesn’t always have to be explicitly stated. It may be cleverly developed and clearly implied.
Then listen to the rest without providing spoken comment:

State the main arguments or theories presented.Editor should be able to describe the logical path of development. Does it make sense? Is it well-ordered and well-developed?

Describe the details presented to support the main point. Editor should be able to list (perhaps in bullet form) the supporting details or primary evidence without superfluous description. This may look like an outline. This is good practice creating a summary.
Describe the end of the paper.

Does the paper end or conclude? Does the concluding statement reflect the main idea? Students should recognize how to create a summary conclusion.

You may ask the author to repeat any section you need to hear again, but refrain from commenting aloud.

What do you like best about the paper?In order to build confidence and trust, students must always be able to say something positive about a peer’s writing. This will require modeling and practice before a live peer edit. It is critical that everyone receive positive feedback and that everyone can say something positive.
What should the author do to improve the paper for next time?This is about the content of the paper. The peer editor must be able to give some constructive criticism before looking at the paper.

Now read the paper.

Does it look the way it sounded when read?
The directions for this part of the activity can be tailored to match recent instruction. This is where instruction of language standards in particular could be assessed. For example: If you have been teaching vocabulary associated with the topic, you may require students to underline vocabulary words used and insist a certain number be included. If you have been studying sentence combining using coordinates and subordinates, you can require students use varied sentences and have the editor identify them or make suggestions for improvement.


  • Proofread for spelling, punctuation, and usage errors. (such as subject/verb agreement, pronoun/antecedent agreement, or consistent verb tense use)

  • Make comments on the paper when/where you can suggest an improvement. (such as contradictory statements, need for evidence, or problems with logic or organization)


When you begin using this protocol, keep it simple. Add steps and/or complexity as students get more comfortable with the protocol. You can use it to provide feedback on short, first draft essays without ever having to do the revision. This experience is valuable as a formative assessment and can be completed in one class period. Ultimately, your job will get much easier and your students’ writing gets much better! Change the contents of these directions as needed and appropriate.
NOTE: by midyear, the teacher should not ever be the first person to read any student’s paper.

Writing Title or Assignment Topic___________________________________



AUTHOR _______________________PEER EDITOR_____________________
Before you look at what is written, listen to the author reading it to you.

After the introduction:

State the main idea of the paper

Then listen to the rest without providing spoken comment:State the main arguments or theories presented.
Describe the details presented to support the main point.

.
Describe the end of the paper.


You may ask the author to repeat any section you need to hear again, but refrain from commenting aloud.

What do you like best about the paper?

What should the author do to improve the paper for next time?


Now read the paper.

Does it look the way it sounded when read?

  • Proofread for spelling, punctuation, and usage errors.

  • Make comments on the paper when/where you can suggest an improvement.

Note standards referenced


The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2016
send message

    Main page