Outlines of examination syllabi and courses of reading



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PUNJABI UNIVERSITY, PATIALA

ORDINANCES

AND

OUTLINES OF EXAMINATION



SYLLABI AND COURSES OF READING

FOR


FOUR YEAR INTEGRATED B.Sc. (Medical) B.Ed. DEGREE PROGRAMME

(SYMESTER SYSTEM)

REGULAR

FOR


2017-2018 EXAMINATIONS

Note: Punjabi University, Patiala reserves the right to amend Regulations, Scheme of Examinations, Pass Criteria, Scheme of Studies and courses of study as and when it deems necessary. The Colleges of Education are required to strictly follow the syllabi prescribed by the University. No deviation is permissible.



Four Year Integrated B.Sc. (Medical) B.Ed. Degree Programmer.

Semester-1

Paper

Course

Title

Marks













T

E

I

1

Philosophical Perspective in Education

100

70

30

2

Understanding The Learner

100

70

30

3

Punjabi (Compulsory)

50

35

15

4

English (Communication Skills)

50

35

15

5

Diversity of Microbes










6

Diversity of Cryptograms










7

Cell Biology and Diversity










8

Inorganic Chemistry










9

Organic Chemistry










10

Physical Chemistry











SEMESTER -I

PAPER -1: PHILOSOPHICAL PERSPECTIVE IN EDUCATION
(A) OBJECTIVES

To enable the student teachers to:



  • Understandconcepts and principlesof foundations of education.

  • Apply theories, ideas and generalization of educational foundations.

  • Express and discuss philosophies and social concepts precisely and rationally.

  • Analyze different views and schools of thoughts on education and draw generalization.


(B) SYLLABUS

Section-A

  1. Philosophy: its nature and scope; metaphysics, epistemology and axiology

  2. Education: its nature and scope

  3. Philosophy and education: Relationship between the two; Aims and determinants of education with reference to curriculum and pedagogy

  4. Philosophies of education : Naturalism, Idealism, Pragmatism and Realism

Section-B

  1. Retlections on education: Guru Nanak Dev, R.N.Tagore, M.K. Gandhi, J. Krishnamurti and Vivekanands contribution to educational philosophy

  2. Reflections on Education: Educational aims recommended by Education Commission (1964-66) and NPE (1986)

  3. Values: meaning, significance, kinds, reconciliations between traditional and modern values in education


Activities (Any one of the Following)

  1. Preparing a handout of quotes of educational thinkers(any one) on education, human conduct, truth and morality.

  2. Analysis and study of values of school students.

  3. Content analysis of spiritual and moral theme/issue taken up by a newspaper (on national or vernacular).

[
(C) BOOKS RECOMMENDED

  1. Ansari, S.H. (2003). Philosophical Foundations of Education. New Dethi: Sanjay Prakashan.

  2. Black, N. et aL (2003). Philosophy of Education. UK: Blackwell Publishers.

  3. Broudy, H.S. (1955). Building a Philosophy of Education, New Dethi: Prentice Hall of India.

  4. Brubacher, J.S. Modern Philosophies in Education.

  5. Dewey, 3 (1916/1966). Democracy and Education. An Introduction to the Philosophy of Education, New York: Free Press.

  6. Oomen, T.K. (2014). Social Exclusion in Independent India. Orient Biackswan.

  7. Pathak, Avijit (2004). Social Implications of Schooling: Knowledge, Pedagogy and Consciousness. Rainbow Publishers: Noida.

  8. Pring, R (2004). Philosophy qf Education — Aims. Theoiy, Common Sense and Research, New York: Continuum.

  9. Rajput, J.S. (2006). Human Values and Education. New Delhi: Pragun Publications.

  10. Ross, James (1966). Ground Work of Educational Theory, George 0. Harreap and Co. Ltd., London.

  11. Sri Aurobmdo (1924). A System of National Education, Calcutta: Arya Publishing House.

  12. Tagore, Rabindaranath (1961). Towards Universal Man, Bombay: Asia.

  13. Taneja, V.R. (1998). Educational Thought and Practice. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

  14. Lal,B.K.(1978/2005). Contemporary Indian Philosophy. Delhi: Motilal Banarsi Dass.

  15. Solomon, R.C.(20.08) The Little Philosophy Book. New York: OUP

  16. S inha,Jadunath(2006). Outlines of Indian Philosophy. Calcutta: New Control

  17. Joshi, Kireet (2011). Philosophy of Indian Art Dethi: Popular Media.


(D) EVALUATION

External Examination 70 Marks

Time 3 His

Internal Assessment 30 Marks

Attendance 6

Written Assignment/Project work 12

Two Mid-term Examinations 12
(E) INSTRUCTIONS FOR TIlE PAPER-SETTER

The question paper will consist of three Sections: A, B, and C. Section A and B will have four questions from the respective Sections of the syllabus and will carry 10 marks each. Section C will consist of 10 questions of 3 marks each which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and carry 30 marks in all.


(F) INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

Candidates are required to attempt two questions each from the sections A and B and the entire section C.


PAPER-II: UNDERSTANDING THE LEARNER
(A) OBJECTIVES

To enable the student teachers to:



  • Understand the learner and his abilities.

  • Understand the process of human development with special reference to adolescence.

  • Analyze the characteristics and problems of Indian adolescents.

  • Familiarize with administration and interpretation of psychological tests.

  • Apply the understanding of the different typed of learners in various classroom situations.

SECTION-A

  1. Educational psychology- concept, nature, scope and importance.

  2. Growth and development: meaning, difference, principles, influence of heredity and environment on growth and development of a child.

  3. Indian Adolescents: Characteristics of emotional, social, cognitive and moral development, Problems of Indian adolescents. Role of family, school, community and mass-media in development of adolescents.Role of different cultures in development of adolescents.

SECTION-B

  1. Individual differences: inter and intra individual differences, concept, causes and implications.

  2. Intelligence: concept, theories-Spearman, Thurstone and Gardner. Uses and limitations of Intelligence tests.

  3. Learning: Meaning, process and factors affecting learning of an individual, Trial and error theory and classical conditioning theory.

  4. Motivation: Concept, types and techniques, educational implications.

  5. Learner with special needs: Meaning, types: gifted,deli.nquents,creative,slow learner and their educational programmes.


Activities (Any one of the following)

  1. Administration and interpretation of any one psychological test (Intelligence! motivation! creativity).

  2. Visit to a school and write a report on problems being faced by the students.


(C) RECOMMENDED BOOKS

    1. Dandapani, S. (2004) Advanced Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Anniol Publications Pvt. Ltd.

    2. Bigge, M.C. & Row. (1971): Learning Theories for Teachers (2nd Ed.). N.Y.: Harper Collins.

    3. Bower, G.H. and Hilgard, E.R. (1981) theories of Learning. Prentic Hall, Inc. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

    4. Woolfolk, A. (2006) Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Pearson Publications.

    5. Hall, C.S., Gardener, L. and John, B.C. (2010) Theories of Personality. Delhi: Aggarwal Printing Press.

    6. Anastasi, A. and Susana U. (2010) Psychological Testing. New Delhi: PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd.

    7. Aggarwal, J.C. (1995). Essentials of Educational Psychology, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House Private Limited.

    8. Allport, G.W. (1961). Pattern arid Growth in Personality: New York.

    9. Chauhan, S.S. (2002). Advanced Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing.

    10. Gore, M.S.(1984). Education and Modernization in India. Jaipur:Rawat Publishers.

    11. Havighurst, R. et at (1995). Society and Education. Baston: Allyen ad Bacon

    12. H.P.B Wheldall, K. (2006). Developments in Educatonal psychology. New York: Routledge.

    13. Kamat, A.R.(1985). Education and Social Change in India. Bombay: Samaiya Publishing Co.

    14. Rinehart and Winston, Bhatia, K.K. (2008). Basis of Educational Psychology. Ludhiana: Kalyani Publishers.

    15. Sharma, •K.N. (1990). Systems, Theories and Modern Trends in Psycholo gy.Agra:Woo ifork.

    16. Anita (2004). Educational Psychology: Reason Education (Singapore). New Delhi: Indian Branch.

    17. Upadhya,B. & Singh Y.K.(201 1). Encyclopaedia of Education Psychology.(vol. I to ll).Delhi: APH

    18. Crawford,W & De Cecco, J.P. The Psychology of Learning and Instruction Delhi:Previtice-HaIl.

    19. Kumar,R.(2009)Child Development.(VoU To II). New Delhi:APH


(D) EVALUATION

External Examination 70 Marks

Time 3 Hrs

Internal Assessment 30 Marks

Attendance 6

Written Ass ignment/Project work 12

Two Mid-term Examinations 12
(E) INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

The question paper will consist of three Sections: A, B, and C. Section A and B will have four questions from the respective Sections of the syllabus and will carry 10 marks each. Section C will consist of 10 questions of 3 marks each which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and carry 30 marks in all.


(F) INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

Candidates are required to attempt two questions each from the sections A and B and the entire section C.


SEMESTER –I
PAPER-II

Understanding the Learner

(A) OBJECTIVES
To enable the student teachers to:

  • Understand the learner and his abilities.

  • Understand the process of human development with special reference to adolescence.

  • Analyze the characteristics and problems of Indian adolescents.

  • Familiarize with administration and interpretation of psychological tests.

  • Apply the understanding of the different typed of learners in various classroom situations.

SECTION-A

(i) Educational psychology- concept, nature, scope and importance.

(ii) Growth and development: meaning, difference, principles, influence of heredity and environment on growth and development of a child.

(iii) Indian Adolescents: Characteristics of emotional, social, cognitive and moral development, Problems of Indian adolescents. Role of family, school, community and mass-media in development of adolescents. Role of different cultures in development of adolescents.



SECTION-B

(i) Individual differences: inter and intra individual differences, concept, causes and implications.

(ii) Intelligence: concept, theories-Spearman, Thurstone and Gardner. Uses and limitations of Intelligence tests.

(iii) Learning: Meaning, process and factors affecting learning of an individual, Trial and error theory and classical conditioning theory.

(iv) Motivation: Concept, types and techniques, educational implications.

(v) Learner with special needs: Meaning, types: gifted, delinquents, creative, slow learner and their educational programmes.


ACTIVITIES (ANY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING)

(i) Administration and interpretation of any one psychological test (Intelligence/motivation/ creativity).

(ii) Visit to a school and write a report on problems being faced by the students.

(C) RECOMMENDED BOOKS


    1. Dandapani, S. (2004) Advanced Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd.

    2. Bigge, M.C. & Row. (1971): Learning Theories for Teachers (2nd Ed.). N.Y.: Harper Collins.

    3. Bower, G.H. and Hilgard, E.R. (1981) theories of Learning. Prentic Hall, Inc. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

    4. Woolfolk, A. (2006) Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Pearson Publications.

    5. Hall, C.S., Gardener, L. and John, B.C. (2010) Theories of Personality. Delhi: Aggarwal Printing Press.

    6. Anastasi, A. and Susana U. (2010) Psychological Testing. New Delhi: PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd.

    7. Aggarwal, J.C. (1995). Essentials of Educational Psychology, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House Private Limited.

    8. Allport, G.W. (1961). Pattern and Growth in Personality: New York.

    9. Chauhan, S.S. (2002). Advanced Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing.

    10. Gore, M.S.(1984). Education and Modernization in India. Jaipur:Rawat Publishers.

    11. Havighurst, R. et al.(1995). Society and Education. Baston: Allyen ad Bacon

    12. H.P.B Wheldall, K. (2006). Developments in Educatonal psychology. New York: Routledge.

    13. Kamat, A.R.(1985). Education and Social Change in India. Bombay: Samaiya Publishing Co.

    14. Rinehart and Winston, Bhatia, K.K. (2008). Basis of Educational Psychology. Ludhiana: Kalyani Publishers.

    15. Sharma, K.N. (1990). Systems, Theories and Modern Trends in Psychology. Agra: Woolfork.

    16. Anita (2004). Educational Psychology: Reason Education (Singapore). New Delhi: Indian Branch.

    17. Upadhya,B. & Singh Y.K.(2011). Encyclopaedia of Education Psychology. (vol. I to II). Delhi: APH

    18. Crawford, W & De Cecco, J.P. The Psychology of Learning and Instruction, Delhi: Prentice-Hall.

    19. Kumar,R.(2009)Child Development.(Vol.I To II). New Delhi: APH.

(D) EVALUATION

External Examination 70 Marks

Time 3 Hrs

Internal Assessment 30 Marks

Attendance 6

Written Assignment/Project work 12

Two Mid-term Examinations 12
(E) INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

The question paper will consist of three Sections: A, B, and C. Section A and B will have four questions from the respective Sections of the syllabus and will carry 10 marks each. Section C will consist of 10 questions of 3 marks each which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and carry 30 marks in all.


(F) INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

Candidates are required to attempt two questions each from the sections A and B and the entire section C.



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ENGLISH (COMMUNICATION SKILLS)

B.A./B.Sc PART-I (SEMESTER-I)
English Communication Skills

One paper of 100 marks to be attempted in three hours

No. of Teaching Periods: 75 Pass Marks: 35%

(Six periods per week) Time: 3 Hour

External: 75 Marks

Internal Assessment: 25 Marks


Course Content:

One Literary Text

Composition

Grammar


1`

  1. Texts Prescribed:

  1. Prose Parables (Orient BlackSwan, 2013)

The following stories from the above volume are prescribed:

    1. The Kabuliwallah : Rabindranath Tagore

    2. The Eyes Are Not Here: Ruskin Bond

    3. The Death of A Hero: Jai Nimbkar

    4. Grief: Anton Chekov

    5. Uncle Podger Hangs A Picture: Jerome K. Jerome

    6. The Doctor's Word: R.K. Narayan

    7. Green Parrots in A Cage: Gopi Gauba

    8. The Doll's House: Katherine Mansfield

    9. A Service Of Love: O Henry

    10. Dusk: H.H. Munroe (Saki)




  1. Oxford Practice Grammar by John Eastwood (Ed. 2014)


UNIT-I

Q. No 1: One essay type question with an internal alternative on theme, incident or character from chapter 01 to 05 of Prose Parables. The answer should not exceed 200-250 words

11 marks

Q. No 2: One essay type question with an internal alternative on theme, incident or character from chapter 06 to 10 of Prose Parables. The answer should not exceed 200-250 words.

10 marks
UNIT-II

Q. No. 3: Four short-answer questions to be attempted (in about 100 words each) out of the given six from Chapters 01 to 10 of Prose Parables. 12 marks

Q. No. 4: Translation from English into Hindi/Punjabi of a given passage consisting of five sentences.

In lieu of Translation

(For Foreign students who do not know Punjabi/Hindi)

Paraphrase of a stanza from a poem of about 5 to 7 lines.) 10 marks


UNIT-III

Q. No. 5: This question shall comprise eight short answer (8x2) and eight objective type questions (8x2) and will be based on the prescribed units and exercises from Oxford Practice Grammar. Each question shall carry 02 marks.

16+16=32 marks

This objective-type question will be based on Oxford Practice Grammar by John Eastwood. The candidate is required to attempt all the eight questions.

Exercises 01 to 03 and 76 to 117

A candidate will be required to attempt eight out of ten sentences set in (a) and eight out of twelve in (b).



Important:

The examiner shall give a clear instruction to the candidates to attempt these questions only at one place and only once. Second or subsequent attempts, unless the earlier ones have been crossed out, shall not be evaluated.




SYLLABUS
B.Sc. (Botany) Part-I (Semester-I)

THEORY
Paper I: Diversity of Microbes 30 8 (Attendance: 2 Assignment: S House Test 3)

Paper II: Diversity of Cryptogams 30 8 (Attendance: 2 + Assignment: 3 House Test 3)


PRACTICAL

Pertaining to Theory Paper I: 24

Pertaining to Theory Paper II:
Total Marks (Semester-I)

Theory 60 Marks

Practical 24 Marks

Sessional Work Pertaining to Theory Paper I & 11 (Internal Assessment) 16 Marks

TotaI 100 Marks
Note:


      1. The number of teaching hours per week will be three for each theory paper and three for each practical in every semester. In all, there will be 12 teaching hours per week covering both theory and practical requirements. (Six teaching hours for theory and Six teaching hours for practical per week)

      2. There will be One Practical paper of 3 hours pertaining to the theory paper I & 11 in semester and theory paper III & iv in semester-Il covering the entire syllabus in each semester.

      3. The liming of practical will be 9.00 am to 12.00 noon.



SEMESTER-I

PAPER- I: DIVERSITY OF MICROBES
Max. Marks: 30 Total Teaching hours: 45

Pass Marks: 35% Time Allowed: 3 Hours


INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER SETTER

The question paper will consist of three sections A, B and C. Section A and B will have four questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 5 marks each. Section C will consist of 5 short-answer type questions of 2 marks each which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and will carry 10 marks in all.


INSTRUCTIONS FOR CANDIDATES

Candidates are required to attempt two questions from each section A and B and the entire section C, which is compulsory.


SECTION-A

      1. Viruses: General characters, structure, classification and replication of viruses; importance of viruses, a brief account of Mycoplasma.

      2. Bacteria- A general account with particular reference to ultra structure, classification, mode of reproduction, nutritional types and economic importance; General account of cyanohacteria with emphasis on Oscillatoria.

SECTION-B

      1. Fungi and Fungi like organisms: General characters. Classification and economic importance; important Features and life history of members of Kingdom

Chromista: Aihugo and Phytophihora. Kingdom Fungi: Zygornycota-Mucor; Ascornycota-Sacchuroinyces, Jencz1i,um and Peziza.

      1. Important features and life history of Basidiomycota, Mitosporic Fungi and Lichens - Puccinia, Uctilago, Agaricus; cercospora, colletorrichurn. Lichens:

Structure. morphology, reproduction and economic importance.
RECOMMENDED REDINGS

        1. Alexopolus. C.J., Mims, C.W. and Blackwell. M. 1996. Introductory Mycology. John Willey & Sons. Inc., Singapore.

  1. Black, J.G. 1999. Microbiology — Principles and Explorations. John Wiley & Sons. inc. Singapore.

  2. Clifton, A. 1958. Introduction to Bacteria. McGraw Kills & Co., New York.

  3. Deacon, J.W., 1997. Modern Mycology 3 Edition, Blackwell Science, Ltd. U.K.

  4. Dube. R.C. 1990. An Introduction to Fungi. Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.

  5. Sharma, P.1). 2001. The Fungi. Rastogi Co., Meerut.

  6. Stainer, R.Y., Ingraham, J.L., Wheelis. M.L. and Painter, P.R. 1989. General Microbiology. Macmillan.


SEMESTER-l

PAPER-Il: DIVERSITY OF CRYPTOCRAMS
Max. Marks: 30 Total Teaching hours: 45

Pass Marks: 35% Time Allowed: 3 Hours


INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPLR SETTER

The question paper will consist of three sections A, B and C. Section A and B vill have Ibiir questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 5 marks each. Section C will consist of 5 short-answer type questions of 2 marks each which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and will carry 10 marks in all.


INSTRUCTIONS FOR CANDIDATES

Candidates are required to attempt two questions from each section A and B and the entire section C. which is compulsory.


SECTION-A

  1. Basic characteristics of algae; habitat, range of thallus, algal cell structure, photosynthetic pigments, cell wall, flagella, reserves food materials and nutrition; lifecycle pattern, classification and economic importance of algae.

  2. Important features and life history of Chlorophyceae — Volvox, Oedogoniurn; Xanthophyceae- Vaucheria; Phaeophyceae- Eclocarpus, Sargassurn; R hodophyceae- Batrachospermum.

Section-B

  1. Bryophyta: Amphibians of Plant Kingdom displaying alternation of generations; structure, reproduction and affinities of Marchanlia (Ilepaticopsida); Anthoceros (Anthoccrotopsida); Funaria (Bryopsida) - developmental stages are excluded. Evolution of sporophytes in Bryophytes.

  2. Pteridophyta: ‘l’he first vascular plants: important characteristics, structure and reproduction of Psilopsida (Rhynia); Lycopsida (Lycopodium, Selagineila); Sphenopsida (Equisetum) and Pteropsida (Pteris and Marsilea — developmental stages are excluded. Evolution of stellar system in Fern-allies and Ferns.


RECOMMENDED REDINGS

  1. Kumar, H.D. 1999. Introductory Phyco/ogy 6$’econd Edition,). Affiliated East West Press Ltd., New Delhi,

  2. Parihar, N.S. 1996. Biology and Morphology of Pteridophytes. Central Book Depot.,
    Allahabad.

  3. Rashid, A. 1998. An Introduction to Bryophyta. Vikas Pub. House Pvt. Ltd., New I)clhi.

  4. Rashid. A. 1999. An Introduction to Preridophyta. Vikas Puhl. House, Pvt.Ltd.. New Delhi.

  5. Sharma. O.P. 2001. Text BookofPleridophytes. MacMillan India Ltd.

  6. Sporne, K.R. 1991. The Atoiphology of Pteridop1ivte.. [3. 1. Publishing Pvt. Ltd.. Bombay.

  7. Vasishta, P.C. 1996. B,yophyta, S. Chand &Co, Ltd.. New Delhi.

  8. Vasishia, P.C. 2000. Pteridophyla. S. Chand & Co. Ltd.. New Delhi.

  9. 9, Singh, S.K. 2008. Bryophyta, Compus Book, International, New Delhi.

  10. Lec., R.E. 2008. Phycology. Conibridge University, Press, U.K.

  11. II. Sharma, O.P. (2011). Diversity of Microbes and Cryptogams-Algae. l’ata McGraw Hill. New Delhi.

  12. Vashishta, B.R., Sinha. A.K. and Singh, V.P. (2011). Botany for Degree Students-Algae. S. Chand Publisher, New Delhi


SUGESTED LABORATORY EXCERCISES

Teachers may select plants/material available in their locality/institution.



  1. Study of the genera included under algae and fungi indicating their systematic position.

  1. Study of morphology, reproductive structures and anatomy of the examples cited in theory under Bryophyta and Pteridophyla indicating their systematic position.

  2. Observation of disease symptoms in hosts infected by bacteria (Citrus canker), fungi — (White rust of crucifer, Late blight of potato, loose smut of wheat, brown rust of wheat, yellow stripe rust of wheat, tikka disease of groundnut, red rot of sugarcane). viruses — (Yellow vein mosaic of bhindi) and mycoplasma -(little leaf disease of brinjal). Examination of diseased material and identification of pathogens.

  3. Gram staining of bacteria.

  4. Study of crustose, ftliose and fruiticose lichen thalli.

SUGGESTED READING (FOR LABORATORY EXCERCISES)
Books:

      1. Bendre, A. and Kumar, A. 1990-91, Practical Botany, Rastogi Publications, Meerut.

      2. Kashyap. S.R. 1972. Liverworts of the Western Himalayas. New Delhi.

      3. Singh, R.S. 1998. Plant Diseases. Oxford IBH Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER SETTER

Practical Paper-I (Pertaining to Theory Paper-I & II)



  1. Section cutting and preparation of permanent slide of material pertaining to Bryothytes/Pteridophytes. 3

  2. 2. Identification, classification and morphological note on specimens from Algae, Fungi, Lichen Bryophyta and Pteridophyta. 3 x 4 = 12

  3. 3. Study of diseased plant material 3

  4. 4. Practical note book. 3

  5. 5. Viva-voce, 3

24Marks
SYLLABUS

B.SC. (ZOOLOGY) PART-I

LECTURES TO BE DELIVERED

MARKS


Theory Practical Theory Internal Practical

Semester-I:

Cell Biology and Biodiversity 90 60 50 20 30
Note: There will be one Practical paper of 3 hours pertaining to entire syllabus in each Semester.
SEMESTER-I

CELL BIOLOGY AND BIODIVERSITY
Max. Marks: 50 Time Allowed: 3 hours

Pass marks: 35% Lectures to be delivered: 90

(Each of 45 minutes duration)
Note: The number of lectures per week will be nine for theory and six for practical.
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PAPER SETTER

The question paper will consist of three sections A, B and C. Section A and B will have four questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 7V2 marks each. Section C will consist of 10 short-answer type questions which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and will carry 20 marks in all.


INSTRUCTIONS FOR CANDIDATES

Candidates are required to attempt two questions from each section A and B and the entire section C.


SECTION-A

CELL BIOLOGY

I. Methods in Cell Biology : Principles of light and electron microscopes, fixation and fixatives, staining techniques (single and double).

II Organisation of Cell : Extra nuclear and nuclear ultra structure and functions of cell organdies.

(a) Plasma membrane : Structure, osmosis, active and passive transport, endocytosis and exocytosis.

(b) Endoplasmnic reticulum : Structure, types and associated enzymes.

(c) Mitochondria : Structure, mitochondrial enzymes and the role of mitochondria in respiration.

(d) Golgi Complex : Structure and functions.

(e) Ribosomes : Types of ribosomes, their structure and functions.

(f) Lysosomes : Polymoiphism and their function.

(g) Centrosorne : Structure and functions.

(h) Nucleus : Structure and functions of nuclear membrane, nucleolus and chromosomes.
III. Type Study-I (Protozoa to Porifera)

1. Protozoa:


  1. Classification upto orders with brief ecological note and economic importance of the following:

  2. Entamoeba, Trrpanosoma. Giardia, J’Joctilucu Elmeria, Opalina. Vorticella, Balantidizim arid Nvciotherus.

  3. Detailed study of the following animal types:

  4. Amoeba, Paramecium and Plasmodium. Introduction to Parasitic Protozoa

2. Porifera

  1. Classification upto orders with brief ecological note and economic importance of the following:

Grantia. Euple etc//a. Ilyalonema and Span gilla.

  1. Detailed study of the following animal types:

Sycon

SECTION: B
IV. Type Study-II (Coelenterata to Annelida)

1. Coelenterata:

    1. Classification upto orders with brief ecological note and economic importance of the following: Hydra. Sertularia. Plum u/aria, Ubelia iubukk4 Bougaüwillea, Porpita, Veiella, Physalia, Rhizostoma, Millipora, A urelia, Alcyonium, Tz.thipora, Zoanthus, ivletridium. Madrepora, Favia, Fun gia and Astrangia h. Detailed study of the following animal types: Obelia

2. Platyhelminthes :

  1. Classification upto orders with brief ecological note and economic importance of the following: Dugesia. Schistosoma and Echinococcus.

  2. Detailed study of the following animal types: Fasciola, Taeniu

3. Aschclminthes:

  1. Classification upto orders with briefecologica1 note and economic importance of the following: Ascartc, Oxyuris and Wuchereria

  2. Detailed study of the following animal types: Ascaris, Parasiñc adaptations in Helminths

4. Annelicla:

  1. Classification upto orders with brief ecological note and economic importance of the following: Nereis,Polynoe, Eunice, Arenicola, Aphrodite, Amphitrife, Chaetopierus, Tuhifex and Pontobdella.

  2. Detailed study of the following animal types: Pheretima (Earthworm)


PRACTICAL PAPFR
Max. Marks: 30 Time Al/owed: 3 hours

Pass marks : 35%


1. Classification upto orders with ecological notes and economic importance of the following:
A. Protozoa: (a) Examination of cultures of Eugleiia and Paramecium.

(b) Slides: Amoeba, Euglena, Trypansotna, Noctiluca, Eimeria, Monocystis, Paramecium (Binary fission and conjugation), Opalina. Vortice/la, Ba/antidium, Nyc! otherus & Polystomella.


B. Porifera: Specimens: Sycon, Grantia, Euplectella, Hyalonema.

Son gilla and Euspongia.


C. Coelentenita: (a) Specimens: Po.rpita, Velella, Physalia, Aurelia, Rhizostoina, Metridium, Mil/ipora, Aicyonium, Tubipora, Zoanthus, Madrepoia. Favia, Fun gia and Astrangia.

b) Slides: Hydra (W.M.), Hydra with buds, Ohelia colony and medusa), Senularia, Plumularia. Tuhularia, Bougainvillea and Aurelia.


D. Platyhelrninthcs: (a) Specimens: l)ugesia, Fasciola, Taenia and Echinococcus.

(b) Slides: Miracidium, Sporocyst, Redia, Cercaria of Fasciola, Scolex and Proglottids of Taenia (mature and gravid)


E. Asehelminthes : Ascaris (‘male and female,), Trichinella and Ancylostoma.
F. Annelida : Specimens: Pheretirna, Nerds, I-fcteroncrei,s; Polynoe. Eunice,

Aphrodite, (Jzaetopterus, Arenicola, Tubifex and Pontobdella.


2. Study of the following permanent stained preparations:

  1. L.S. and TS. Sycon. (Gemmules, Spicules and Spongin fibres of a sponge.

  2. T.S. Hydra (Testis and ovary region)

  3. T. S. Fasciola (Different regions)

  4. T.S. £4scaris (Male and Female)

  5. T.S. Pheretirna (Pharyngeal and typhlosolar regions), setae, septal nephridia, spermathecue and ovary

3. Preparation of the following slides:

Preparation of permanent whole mount stained in borax carmine: J-hdra, Obelia, Sertularia, Phonularia and Bougainvillea.



4. Major dissection: Pheretima (Earthworm) : Digestive, reproductive and nervous systems.

5. Cell Biology:

Study of permanent slides of Mitosis and Meiosis



INSTRUCTIONS FOR PRACTICAL PAPER

      1. Candidates will be required to submit their original note-books containing record of their laboratory work initiated with date by their teachers at the time of practical examination.

      2. Students must be taken out for short excursion to the Zoological gardens, sea shores and hill stations to study habitat and ecology of the animals.

      3. Practical examination shall be held in one session from 9.00 a.m. to 12.00 noon.

      4. Practical examination is to he conductcd by two external examiners.

Max. Marks: 30 Time Allowed: 3 hours

Pass Marks: 35%


        1. Museum specimens: Protozoa to Annelida.

        2. 3 specimens for identification. classification and short morphological note. 9

        3. Study of the permanent slides from Protozoa to Annelida.

        4. 3 slides for identification with emphasis on identification characters. 6

        5. 3. Preparation of thc stained permanent slide. 4

        6. 4. Study the permanent mount of any stage of cell division 2

        7. 5. Major dissection 5

        8. 5. Viva-voce 2

        9. 6. Practical note-book 2


PAPER-I

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
Max Marks : 35 30 hours

Semester Paper : 26 Time allowed - 3 hrs

Internal Assessment: 9 3 period/week

Pass Marks 35%


INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER SETTER

The question paper will consist of three sections: A, B and C, Sections A and B vil1 have four questions each from the respective section of the syllabus and will carry 4 marks each. Section C will consist of 5 short answer questions that will cover the entire syllabus and will he of 2 marks each. Use of scientific non-programmable calculator is allowed.


INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

Candidates are required to attempt five questions (Section C 9th question being compulsory) selecting two questions from each of A & B Sections.


SECTION - A

1. Atomic Structure 7 hrs

Idea of de Brogue matter waves, lleisenherg uncertainty principle, atomic orbitals, Schrodingcr wave equation, significance of, P and 2 quantum numbers, radial and angular wave timctions and probability distribution curve, shapes of s. p. d orbitals. Aufbau and Pauli exclusion principles, Hund’s multiplicity rule. Electronic configurations of the elements and ions.


2. Chemistry of Noble gases 3 hrs.

Chemical properties of the noble gases. chemistry of xenon, structure and bonding in xenon compounds.


3. Chemical Bonding - 1 5 hrs.

Covalent Bond-Valence bond theory and its limitations, directional characteristics of coalent bond, various types of hybridization and shapes of simple inor2anic molecules and ions. BeF2 BF3 Cl-I4, PF , SF 6. IF , Sncl2 , XeF , PF 6, Sncl,



SECTION - B
1. Chemical Bonding - II 15 hrs.

Valence shell electron pair repulsion (VSIZPR) theory to NH3, H3O, SF4, CIF5. 1C12, and 1-120. MO theory, homonuclear (elements and ions of 1st and 2nd ro), and heteronuclear (BO, CN, COr, NO, CO. CN). diatomic molecules, multicenter bonding in electron deficient molecule (Boranes) percentage ionic character from dipole moment and electronegativity difference.


2. Ionic Solids –

Concept of close packing, Ionic structures, (NaCI type. Zinc blende, Wurzite, CaF2. and antitluorite), radius ratio rule and coordination number, Limitation of radius ratio rule. lattice deficts, semiconductors, lattice energy and Born-Haher cycle, solvation energy and solubility of ionic solids, polarizing power and polarisability of ions. Fajan’s rule. Metallic bond-Free electron. valence bond and bond theories.


6. Weak Interactions-

Hydrogen bonding, van der Walls forces.


SEMESTER - 1

PAPER-Il

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
Max Marks : 35 30 hours

Semester Paper : 26 Time allowed - 3 hrs

Internal Assessment: 9 3 period/week

Pass Marks : 35%


INSTRUC1’IONS FOR THE PAPER SETTER

[he question paper will consist of three sections: A. B and C. Sections A and B vill have tbur questions each from the respective section of the syllabus and will carr 1 marks each. Section C will consist of 5 short answer questions that will cover the entire syllabus and will be of 2 marks each. Use of’ scientific non-programmable calculator is allowed.


INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

Candidates are required to attempt five questions (Section C 9th question being compulsory) selecting two questions from each of A & B Sections.


SECTION - A
1. Structure and Bonding 5 Hrs.

Hybridization, bond lengths and bond angles, bond energy, localized and delocalized chemical bond, Van der Walls interactions, resonance, hyperconjugation. aromaticity, inductive and field effects, hydrogen bonding.


II. Mechanism of Organic Reactions 7 Hrs

Curved arrow notation, drawing electron movements with half- headed and double headed arrows. homolytic and heterolytic bond breaking. Types of reagents of organic reaction. Energy considerations. Reactive intermediates-bocation.s, carbanions. free radicals. carbcnes, arynes and nitrenes (with examples). Assigning formal charges on intermediates and other ionic species.

Methods of determination of reaction mechanism (product analysis, intermediates, isotope effect, ki rietic and stereo-chemical studies).

III Alkanes 4 Hrs.

Isomerism in alkanes, sources, methods olformation (with special reference to Wurtz rcaction, Koihe reaction. Corey-House reaction and decarboxylation of carboxylic acids), physical properties and Mechanism of free radical halogenation of alkanes: orientation. reactivit) and selectivity.


SECTION B
4. Cyclo alkanes 3 Hrs

Cycloaiktmnes--nomenclature, chemical reactions, Bacyers strain theory and its limitations. Ring strain in small rings (cyclopropane and cyclobutane), theory of strain less rings. The case ofcclopropane ring: banana bonds.


5. Stereochemistry of Organic Compounds 12 Hrs.

Concept of isomerism. Types of isomerism

Optical isomerism-elements of symmetry, molecular chirality, enantiomers, stereogenic ccntrcc. optical activity, properties of enantiomers, chiral and acliiral molecules with t o stereogen ic centres, diastercom ers. th rco and erythro diastereomers. meso compounds, resolution of enantiomers, inversion, retention and racemization.

Relative and absolute configuration, sequence rules, I) & Land R & S systems of nomenclature. Geometric isomerism-determination of configuration of geometric isomers, E & Z system of nomenclature, geometric isomerism in oxirnes and alicyclic compounds.

Conformational isomerism-conformational analysis of ethane and n—butane; conformations of cyclohexane. axial and equatorial bonds, conformation of mono substituted cyclohexane (lerivatives,

Newman projection and Sawhorse formulae, Fischer and flying wedge formulae.

Difference between contiration and conformation.



PAPER-Ill

PHYSICAI. CHEMISTRY
Max Marks : 35 30 hours

Semester Paper : 26 Time allowed - 3 hrs

Internal Assessment: 9 3 period/week

Pass Marks : 35%


INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER SETTER

The question paper will consist of the sections: A, 13 and C. Sections A and B ill have four questions each from the respective section of the syllabus and will carry 4 marks each. Section C will consist of 5 short answer questions that will cover the entire syllabus and will he of 2 marks each. Use of scientific non-programmable calculator is allowed.


INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDI DATES

Candidates are required to attempt five questions (Section C 9th question being comptilsoiy) selecting two questions from each of A & B Sections.


SECTION - A

Mathematical Concepts 8 Hrs.

Logarithmic relations, curve sketching, linear graphs and calculation of slopes, differentiation of functions like kx, ex, xn, sin x, log x. maxima and minima, partial differentiation and reciprocity relations. Integration of some useful/relevant functions permutations and combinations. Factorials. Probability


2, valuation of Analytical Data 6 Hrs.

Terms of mean and median. precision and accuracy in chemical analysis, determining accuracy of methods. improving accuracy of analysis. data treatment for series involving relatively few measurements, linear least squares curve fitting, types of errors, standard deviation, confidence limits, rejection of measurements (1:_test and Q-test) numerical problems related to evaluation of analytical data.



SECTION - B

3. Liquid State 4 Hrs.

Intermolecular forces. structure of liquids (a qualitative description) Structural differences between solids, liquids and gases.

Liquid crystals: Difference between liquid crystal, solid and liquid. Classification. structure of nematic and eholestric phases. Thermography and seven segment cell.
4. Gaseous State 8 Hrs

Postulates of kinetic theory of gases. deviation from ideal behaviour, van der Waals equation of states, the isotherms of van der Waals equation. relationship between critical constants and van der Waals constants. the law of corresponding states, reduced equation of state.

Molecular velocities: Root mean square. average and most probable velocities, Qualitative discussion of the Maxwell’s distribution of molecular velocities, collision number. mean free path and collision diameter. Liquifacation of gases (based on Joule1homson effect).
5. Physical Properties and Molecular Structure 4 Hrs.

Optical activity. Poiarization-(Cfausius-Mossotti equation), orientation of dipoles in. an electric field, dipole moment. Induced dipole moment, measurement of dipole moment temperature method and refractivity method. Dipole moment and structure of molecules, magnetic properties-paramagnetisrn, diamagnetism and ferromagnetism.



PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY - I

SEMESTER I
Max Marks: 45 6 Periods / week

Passing Marks : 35%


INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE

PAPER SETTERS EXAMINERS/CANDIDATES

The Practical Examinations will he held in morning (one day) and morning session will be of 3 hours duration. During this session students will perform semi micro analysis. Paper setter xviii enlist five different mixtures and the examiner will randomly distribute these mixtures amongst the students. Each candidate will analyse one mixture. Students are permitted to consult the books for the scheme of tests for semimicro analysis. Examiners will check the note hooks and will hold viva-voce.


INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Semi-micro analysis:

Cation analysis, separation and identification of ions from Groups 1. II, 111, IV, V and VI. Anion analysis (2 cation and 2 anion with no interference). 30 Marks



Viva Voce 10 Marks

Copy 5 Marks


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