Organizer #3 of 4 Writing Strategies Differentiation Due: Tuesday, 28 February 2012 All homework must be completed in its entirety



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CAHSEE Homework Organizer #3 of 4

Writing Strategies Differentiation

Due: Tuesday, 28 February 2012

All homework must be completed in its entirety. Incomplete or incorrect homework will not receive any points! Random homework checks will be completed at the teacher’s discretion and students will be expected to have all assigned work complete and ready to be stamped at any time.

Special CAHSEE Reminder: To avoid a homework card and a zero, you must provide evidence that you have used the Six-Step Start-Up (underlining, highlighting, stars, notes in margins, etc.) and POE (wrong answers crossed out).

Assignment

Number

Assignment Description

Due Date

Assignment Value

Points Earned

1

Clauses, Phrases, and Punctuation” Practice Test Questions

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

Thursday, 2/16

25




2

Review: “Clauses, Phrases, and Punctuation”

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

Friday, 2/17

25




3

Figurative Language

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

Tuesday, 2/21

25




4

English Usage” Practice Test Questions

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

Wednesday, 2/22

25




5

Identifying Genre and Purpose

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

Thursday, 2/23

25




6

Review: “English Usage”

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

Friday, 2/24

25




7

Sentence Construction” Practice Test Questions

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

Monday, 2/27

25




8

Answer Key and Self-Reflection

  • All questions answered according to the directions.

  • Attach to the end of this packet.

Tuesday, 2/28

10




9

Grammar Packet

  • All blanks filled in, even for days you were absent.

  • Attach to the end of this packet.

Tuesday, 2/28

35













Total Points Earned

(of 220)



Assignment #1: Due Thursday, 16 February 2012



Clauses, Phrases and Punctuation

Standard: WOC 1.1 – Identify and correctly use clauses, phrases, and mechanics of punctuation.

ESLR: Resourceful Learner – Take responsibility for learning

Rationale: On the CAHSEE you will be asked to identify correctly punctuated sentences. You should be familiar with the rules and conventions of punctuation. You probably already have a firm grasp on how to punctuate sentences, but here are a few definitions to jog your memory.

Directions: Review the definitions below and then answer the questions that follow.

  1. Main Clause (a.k.a. Independent Clause): A simple sentence within a compound sentence. It is joined to the rest of the sentence with a comma and a coordinating conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so) or by a semicolon. From your grammar review: it contains a subject and a verb, and it can stand on its own.

    1. Example: I need to get up and do something, but I am very tired.

    2. Example: I’m going to the airport; it’s an hour by car if I obey all traffic laws.

  2. Subordinate Clause (a.k.a. Dependent Clause): A clause (contains a subject and predicate) that cannot stand on its own; it must be joined to a main clause to create a sentence. When the subordinate clause comes at the beginning of the sentence, it is separated from the main clause by a comma.

    1. Example: Before the hairdresser cuts your hair, she will wash and condition it.

    2. Example: The hairdresser will wash and condition your hair before she cuts it.

      1. Notice there is no comma when the subordinate clause is at the end.

  3. Gerund Phrase: A gerund (-ing verb acting as a noun) along with its modifiers. There is no punctuation between a gerund phrase and the rest of the sentence.

    1. Example: Telling a lie is a surefire way to get in trouble.

  4. Infinitive Phrase: An infinitive (to plus a verb’s base form, often used as a noun) plus complements and modifiers. There is no punctuation between an infinitive phrase and the rest of the sentence.

    1. Example: Amelia’s only dream was to learn to fly.

  5. Participial Phrase: A participle (-ing or –ed verb acting as an adjective) plus words that complete its meaning. When a participial phrase comes before the word it modifies, a comma is necessary.

    1. Example: Prancing crazily around the room, Isaiah knocked the lamp off the table.

    2. Example: From a distance, the fireflies dancing in midair looked like sparks from a bonfire.

      1. Notice there is no comma when the participial phrase comes after the word it modifies.

Directions: Choose the BEST replacement for the underlined section of each sentence. Select “Correct as is” if the section does not need to be replaced. Be sure to use POE and answer the additional questions.

  1. Choose the set of words that BEST completes the following sentence.

  2. While the clothes were______________ to get to the grocery store and back.

    1. in the dryer: Federico had time

    2. in the dryer; Federico had time

    3. in the dryer, Federico had time

    4. in the dryer. Federico had time

  3. Using the list of five rules for punctuating clauses and phrases above (and your grammar packets), explain why your answer is correct.

  4. __________________________________________________

  5. __________________________________________________

  6. Isabella went to audition for the school play she was dying to be cast in the role of Heidi.

    1. for the school play: she was dying

    2. for the school play, she was dying

    3. for the school play; she was dying

    4. Correct as is.

  7. Using the list of five rules for punctuating clauses and phrases above (and your grammar packet), explain why your answer is correct.

  8. __________________________________________________

  9. __________________________________________________

  10. Carlotta is always playing practical jokes on me. But I think I have something up my sleeve that is better than any joke she’s ever played.

    1. jokes on me: But I think

    2. jokes on me, but I think

    3. jokes on me but I think

    4. Correct as is

  11. Using the list of five rules for punctuating clauses and phrases above (and your grammar packet), explain why your answer is correct.

  12. __________________________________________________

  13. __________________________________________________

  14. Jumping up in the air, Zoe grabbed the basketball and raced down the court.

    1. in the air Zoe grabbed

    2. in the air. Zoe grabbed

    3. in the air Zoe, grabbed

    4. Correct as is.

  15. Using the list of five rules for punctuating clauses and phrases above (and your grammar packet), explain why your answer is correct.

  16. __________________________________________________

  17. __________________________________________________

  18. That bottle, on the edge of the counter, is going to fall if someone doesn’t move it soon.

    1. That bottle, on the edge of the counter: is going to fall

    2. That bottle on the edge of the counter, is going to fall

    3. That bottle on the edge of the counter is going to fall

    4. Correct as is.

  19. Using your grammar packet, explain why your answer is correct.

  20. __________________________________________________

  21. __________________________________________________

  22. Choose the set of words that BEST completes the following sentence.

  23. While you’re in the basement, can you _____________ for a game we’re playing.

    1. please bring up my hula hoop I need it

    2. please bring up my hula hoop: I need it

    3. please, bring up my hula hoop? I need it

    4. please bring up my hula hoop? I need it

  24. Using your grammar packet, explain why your answer is correct.

  25. __________________________________________________

  26. __________________________________________________

















































  1. Assignment #2: Due Friday, 17 February 2012

  2. Review: Clauses, Phrases and Punctuation

  3. Standard: WOC 1.1 – Identify and correctly use clauses, phrases, and mechanics of punctuation.

  4. ESLR: Resourceful Learner – Take responsibility for learning

  5. Rationale: On the CAHSEE you will be asked to identify correctly punctuated sentences. You should be familiar with the rules and conventions of punctuation. You probably already have a firm grasp on how to punctuate sentences, but here are a few definitions to jog your memory.

  6. Directions: Review the definitions below and then answer the questions that follow.

  1. Main Clause (a.k.a. Independent Clause): A simple sentence within a compound sentence. It is joined to the rest of the sentence with a comma and a coordinating conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so) or by a semicolon. From your grammar review: it contains a subject and a verb, and it can stand on its own.

    1. Example: I need to get up and do something, but I am very tired.

    2. Example: I’m going to the airport; it’s an hour by car if I obey all traffic laws.

  2. Subordinate Clause (a.k.a. Dependent Clause): A clause (contains a subject and predicate) that cannot stand on its own; it must be joined to a main clause to create a sentence. When the subordinate clause comes at the beginning of the sentence, it is separated from the main clause by a comma.

    1. Example: Before the hairdresser cuts your hair, she will wash and condition it.

    2. Example: The hairdresser will wash and condition your hair before she cuts it.

      1. Notice there is no comma when the subordinate clause is at the end.

  3. Gerund Phrase: A gerund (-ing verb acting as a noun) along with its modifiers. There is no punctuation between a gerund phrase and the rest of the sentence.

    1. Example: Telling a lie is a surefire way to get in trouble.

  4. Infinitive Phrase: An infinitive (to plus a verb’s base form, often used as a noun) plus complements and modifiers. There is no punctuation between an infinitive phrase and the rest of the sentence.

    1. Example: Amelia’s only dream was to learn to fly.

  5. Participial Phrase: A participle (-ing or –ed verb acting as an adjective) plus words that complete its meaning. When a participial phrase comes before the word it modifies, a comma is necessary.

    1. Example: Prancing crazily around the room, Isaiah knocked the lamp off the table.

    2. Example: From a distance, the fireflies dancing in midair looked like sparks from a bonfire.

      1. Notice there is no comma when the participial phrase comes after the word it modifies.

  1. Directions: Choose the BEST replacement for the underlined section of each sentence. Select “Correct as is” if the section does not need to be replaced. Be sure to use POE and answer the additional questions.

  1. Joe was really surprised that Sandy had taken the dog with her.

    1. taken

    2. had took

    3. had of took

    4. Correct as is.

  2. Which two answer choices can you eliminate because they are NEVER correct? __________ and __________

  3. Try the remaining two answer choices – the one that sounds most correct is probably in the correct tense!

  4. It’s relaxing to sit here and watch the ducks in the lake.

    1. It’s relaxing to sit here and,

    2. It’s relaxing to sit here, and

    3. It’s relaxing to sit here; and

    4. Correct as is.

  5. Using the five rules for punctuating clauses and phrases above (and your grammar packet), explain why this is the correct answer. (Hint: Are there two independent clauses in this sentence, or is the subject doing two things?)

  6. __________________________________________________

  7. __________________________________________________

  8. Directions: For numbers 3-10, choose the word or phrase that BEST completes the sentence.

  9. The green backpack has _________________ pockets than the blue one.

    1. least

    2. less

    3. fewest

    4. fewer

  10. Using your grammar packet, explain why this is the correct answer. (Hint: It has to do with adjectives of comparison.)

  11. __________________________________________________

  12. __________________________________________________

  13. The musician played Wendy’s favorite waltz for her husband and _________________.

    1. I

    2. he

    3. she

    4. her

  14. Need help with this one? Cross off “her husband and,” then plug in each of the answer choices. Only one of them should make sense. Which one is it?

  15. When she ____________ the award, she blushed and quickly returned to her seat.

    1. excepted

    2. accepts

    3. accepted

    4. excepts

  16. What does “accept” mean? ___________________________

  17. What does “except” mean? ___________________________

  18. Cross off the two answer choices that use the wrong form of “accept/except.”

  19. What tense (past or present) is this sentence in? ___________

  20. Cross off the remaining answer choice that is in the wrong tense, and you will have your answer!

  21. The frightened pilot’s face was ashen as he gingerly lowered the plane onto Smith’s private _____________ that time was running out for his ailing friend.

    1. runway: he knew

    2. runway, he knew

    3. runway. He knew

    4. runway but he knew

  22. Using the five rules for punctuating clauses and phrases above (and your grammar packet), explain why this is the correct answer.

  23. __________________________________________________

  24. __________________________________________________

  25. We should ________________ without the captain,” the coach said impatiently.

    1. proceeds

    2. precede

    3. precedent

    4. proceed

  26. Use Word Dissection! What is the definition of the word that probably fits in the blank? _______________________

  27. -cede/ceed means go

  28. Pro- means___________________

  29. Pre- means___________________

  30. Which answer choice has the closest definition and is in the correct tense? Look it up if you have to!































  1. Assignment #3: Due Tuesday, 21 February 2012

  2. Figurative Language

  3. Standard: LRA3.7 – Recognize and understand the significance of various literary devices, including figurative language, imagery, allegory, and symbolism, and explain their appeal.

  4. ESLR: Resourceful Learner – Take responsibility for learning

  5. Figurative Language

  6. Figurative language is one of many literary techniques. When authors write figuratively, they use words and phrases to represent something other than what they actually mean. Here are three examples of figurative language:

  7. 1) A metaphor makes a comparison between two things without using the words like or as. For example: The airplane was an eagle soaring through the clouds. Metaphors give readers a more detailed picture of what is happening in a story.

  8. 2) A simile is similar to a metaphor, except for one important detail. Similes use the words like or as to make comparisons. For example: The coach acted like a young child when his team lost the game.

  9. 3) Personification is a literary device in which objects, animals, or ideas are described using human characteristics. For example: The moonlight danced upon the water in the birdbath.

  1. Directions: Read the passages and then answer the questions that follow. As you read, look for the literary techniques explained above.

  2. Juan’s Science Journal

  3. Lightning bolted across the inky sky, rain pelted the misty windows, and Juan’s science journal was missing. The journal was light gray, as big as his hand, and very, very important. On its thick white pages Juan recorded the results of his many experiments.

  4. “All my observations regarding the ants in our backyard—gone!” Juan thought, pacing back and forth in his bedroom. “I absolutely must find that journal.”

  5. He stopped suddenly. “I’ll approach this problem like a good scientist,” he thought. “I’ll form a hypothesis and then investigate it.”

  6. Juan rushed down the stairs, eager to find his father. “Hey, Dad!” he yelled, leaping down the last three steps.

  7. “I’m in here,” Juan’s dad answered. Juan hurried to the kitchen, where his father was tossing a salad.

  8. “You don’t have to yell,” his father said. “This isn’t the Grand Canyon—it’s just our little house.”

  9. “Sorry, Dad,” Juan answered, stealing a baby carrot from the salad. “But I’m looking for my own science journal.”

  10. Juan’s father stopped what he was doing. “When did you last have it?” he asked Juan.

  11. “This afternoon.”

  12. “The last time I saw it was two days ago at breakfast,” Juan’s father recalled as he reached for a handful of cherry tomatoes. “Your sister was giving you a hard time about your grasshopper experiment.”

  13. “You mean my ant observations,” Juan corrected him.

  14. Juan’s father smiled apologetically. “Maybe your mother has seen it,” he said, his tone optimistic. “She’s in the garage looking for some paint.”

  15. “I’ll try asking her,” Juan answered, nabbing another carrot on his way out.

  16. Juan rushed out to the garage. His mother was rummaging through a cabinet, and the storm continued to rage outside. Heavy drops of rain marched across the roof.

  17. “Have you seen my science journal?” Juan asked, almost out of breath.

  18. “Well, hello to you too,” his mother answered, keeping her cool. Even when things got hairy, Juan’s mother was like a still and placid lake.

  19. “Sorry, Mom,” Juan said. “Hello. How are you?”

  20. “I’m fine, honey.”

  21. “That’s good,” Juan said impatiently. “Now—have you seen my science journal?”

  22. “Not recently,” she answered. “When did you last write in it?”

  23. “This afternoon, when I was observing ants in the backyard,” Juan began. “It started to rain, so I ran under the awning on the back porch.”

  24. “Then what happened?” Juan’s mother asked, listening carefully.

  25. “Dad told me to get the newspaper off the front porch before it got sopping wet,” Juan answered.

  26. “And then what happened?”

  27. “I went and got the paper.”

  28. “And what about your journal?” Juan’s mother maintained her patience.

  29. Juan thought for a moment, and then his face lit up. In that moment, the noisy rain suddenly stopped, and a ray of light peeked through the clouds. The sun smiled down on Juan.





  1. Identify an example of a simile in the story. How can you distinguish this use of figurative language from a metaphor?

  1. __________________________________________________

  2. __________________________________________________

  1. Consider the following sentence from the passage: “Heavy drops of rain marched across the roof.” Is this an example of a metaphor, a simile, or personification? What effect does this statement have on you as you read it?

  1. __________________________________________________

  2. __________________________________________________
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