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Week 15 Ch 15: Gifted and Talented Chapter 15

Nov. 28 Student Chapter Presentation

Nov. 30 Final Presentations

Dec. 1 Final Presentations


FINAL
Monday December 5, 2011 8:00-10:00

EDC 330: Introduction to Exceptionalities Reaction Paper Rubric



Name:__________________




10-9

8-7

6-0

Content: Student has demonstrated understanding of the content through a brief (1 Paragraph) of what happened or what the presentation was about










Reflection: Student has reflected on the material by formulating an opinion and supporting it with their own ideas as well as facts










Application: Student has given thought to how the information would be used, or not used, in their own classroom and teaching










Presentation: Student has clearly articulated all of this in a well written 1-2 page paper that is free of spelling and grammatical errors










Total out of 40 points_____________________

EDC 330: Introduction to Exceptionalities

Rubric for Chapter Presentation Name:____________________________________




10-9

8-7

6-0

Content: Student has obviously read and addressed all key points from the chapter in their presentation










Presentation: Student has effectively utilized a PowerPoint presentation to convey pertinent information on the topic. This includes appropriate voice, delivery, and pace










Activity: Student has created and engaged the class in a process to reinforce the material










Professionalism: Student has turned in and presented their PowerPoint on the day assigned, is prepared, makes good eye contact and is dressed appropriately













5-4

3-2

1-0

Resources: Student provides a list of references for their topic/chapter. In addition to the textbook this list must include four other print or media resources










Creativity: Student incorporates video, media, hyperlinks or some other added element to their PowerPoint or creates a learning activity that is particularly unique










Total out of 50 Points_______________

EDC 330: Introduction to Exceptionalities

Rubric for LEAD Program Hours

Name:_______________________________________




25-23

22-19

18-0

Time Log

Candidate has completed all 10 hours within the time frame specified.







Feedback from LEAD

Candidate arrived in a timely manner, was appropriately dressed, was respectful, helpful, and assisted in the manner they were asked to.







Journal

Candidate kept an on-going journal with entries for every time they attended as well as a final entry of at least one page summarizing the overall experience. Candidate turned in their journal on the days they were asked to do so. The entries were legible, articulate and demonstrated reflection of the experience.













Total out of 50 Pts.





Cognitive Strategy Instruction Co-Taught Lesson Rubric

Name:____________________________ Partners Name:_________________________

Component

Emerging/ 0-7

Acceptable 8-9

Target 9-10

Score

Co-Teaching

Candidate does not turn in a reflection regarding the lesson planning/ co-teaching experience.

Candidate turns in a 1 pg. reflection regarding the lesson planning/co-teaching experience but the reflection doesn’t address how the process could be improved.

Candidate turns in a 1 page reflection regarding the lesson planning/co-teaching experience.




Develop Background Knowledge

Candidate omits an anticipatory set that taps into student’s background knowledge. Does not motivate students to learn the strategy.

Candidate may have an anticipatory set but it does not connect the strategy to learning in order to develop motivation for learning this strategy.

Candidate has an anticipatory set that helps students develop the background knowledge for the strategy.




Discuss It

Candidate leaves out multiple required steps of the “Discuss It” stage: Strategy steps, benefits, significance, and commitment

Candidate may engage the class in a whole group discussion of the strategy but may leave out or ineffectively address one or more of the following: Strategy steps, benefits, significance, and commitment.

Candidate engages the class in a whole group discussion of what the strategy steps are and what the benefits and significance is. Teacher asks the students to commit to using the strategy.




Model It

Candidate does not model how to use the strategy or fails to model self-reinforcement strategies and reinforcement statements.

Candidate does an acceptable job of modeling the strategy.

Candidate models how to use the strategy and includes appropriate self-instructions and self-reinforcement statements.




Memorize It


Candidate does not include a lesson step which would help the student memorize this strategy.

Candidate either does not provide a mnemonic to help the students memorize the strategy or does not assist them in rehearsing it.

Candidate introduces a mnemonic to help the student memorize the strategy and assists them in rehearsing it.




Support It

Candidate does not engage the students in an activity where they can practice using the strategy.

Candidate has the students use the strategy with a relevant task and provides guidance as needed but does not provide examples of other situations where the strategy could be used.

Candidate has students use the strategy and self-instructions while performing the task, provides guidance as needed and discusses other applicable uses.




Maintain Independent Practice

*You will not teach this step in this class for the sake of time, but must note it in your lesson plan



Candidate does not provide a plan in their lesson for how they would help students maintain independent performance.

Candidate may mention a plan in their lesson for how they would maintain independent performance but either not how they would help them generalize or evaluate it

Candidate provides a plan for how they would help students maintain independent performance including how they would generalize the strategy and evaluation measures.




Handout

No handout is provided/or the handout leaves out multiple required elements.

A handout is provided but may not include all of the following: Title of the strategy, strategy steps, reference.

A handout is provided to each class member that states the strategy, each of the steps and a reference.




Preparation

Candidate did not provide the lesson to the instructor prior to teaching it and does not appear to be prepared to teach the strategy.

Candidate may have the lesson plan completed but does not appear to be fully prepared to teach the lesson.

Candidate has obviously prepared to teach the lesson including having turned in the lesson plan ahead of time (at least 24 hours).




Presentation

Lesson presentation has multiple areas that could be improved: Enthusiasm, tone and voice quality, eye contact and movement about the room.

Lesson is presented with acceptable enthusiasm, tone and voice quality may have room for improvement. Candidate could work on eye contact and proper movement about the room.

Lesson is presented with enthusiasm, proper tone and voice projection. Candidate uses good eye contact and moves around the room.













Total out of 100 Points




EDC 330: Introduction to Exceptionalities Final Presentation Rubric Name:______________________________

Criteria

Unacceptable 7 or below

Acceptable 7.5-8.5

Target 9-10

Foundations

Candidate has minimally or has not addressed the foundations of the particular disability category.

Candidate has adequately presented the foundations of the particular disability category.

Candidate has thoroughly presented the foundations of this particular disability category.

History

Candidate has minimally or has not addressed the history of the particular disability category.

Candidate has adequately presented the history of the particular disability category.

Candidate has thoroughly presented the history of this particular disability category.

Definitions

Candidate has minimally or has not addressed the definition of the particular disability category.

Candidate has adequately presented the definition of the particular disability category.

Candidate has thoroughly presented the definition of this particular disability category.

Prevalence

Candidate has minimally or has not addressed the prevalence of this particular disability category.

Candidate has adequately presented the prevalence of this particular disability category.

Candidate has thoroughly presented the prevalence of this particular disability category.

Causes

Candidate has minimally or has not addressed the causes of the particular disability category.

Candidate has adequately presented the causes of this particular disability category.

Candidate has thoroughly presented the causes of this particular disability category.

Characteristics

Candidate has minimally or has not addressed the characteristics of this particular disability category.

Candidate has adequately presented the characteristics of this particular disability category.

Candidate has thoroughly presented the characteristics of this particular disability category.

Identification

Candidate has minimally or has not addressed the method of identification for this particular disability category.

Candidate has adequately presented the methods of identification for this particular disability category.

Candidate has thoroughly presented identification methods for this particular disability category.

Methods of Instruction

Candidate has minimally or has not addressed methods of instruction for this particular disability category.

Candidate has adequately presented methods of instruction for this particular disability category.

Candidate has thoroughly presented methods of effective instruction for working with this particular disability category.

Other Strategies

Candidate has minimally or has not addressed other strategies for working with this particular disability category.

Candidate has adequately presented other strategies for working with this particular disability category.

Candidate has thoroughly presented strategies for working with this particular disability category.

Presentation/Grammar

Candidate has not sufficiently presented their topic and/or it contains multiple grammatical errors.

Candidate has adequately presented their topic but with several grammatical errors.

Candidate has effectively presented their topic without any, or with only a couple of grammatical errors.

References

Candidate either only includes one source as a reference for this presentation and/or the references are not appropriate.

Candidate only provides two references or they are not appropriate.

Candidate provides a list of references for their topic. In addition to the textbook this list must include two other print or media resources







Total out of 100 Points




Additional Comments:

1. Please read the following statements

2. Initial after each of them

3. Sign and date this sheet

4. Separate it from your syllabus and pass it to the front of the room
I have read and understand this syllabus.
I understand it is my responsibility to read the rubrics and know what is expected on all assignments.
If I don’t understand something I will ask the instructor for help well before the assignment is due.
I will check my e-mail every day and respond to my instructor when she contacts me.
I will do the reading each week and turn in my assignments on time.
I will participate in class and get the most I can out this semester.
I understand that the grade I earn is up to me.
I will have a good time and make the most of this semester!
Name:______________

LAKE ERIE COLLEGE EDUCATION DIVISION

“To develop professional, knowledgeable, collaborative, and reflective educators who are committed to the diversity and development of all students.”

 

EDC 340 Educational Media and Technology



Spring 2012

 M 2:15 - 4:00

Dr. Linda Siegel

Assistant Professor

Garfield A-11
440-375-8374

lsiegel@lec.edu

Office Hours Mondays or by appointment

 

1. General Course Description
This is a required course for all preservice teachers. It encompasses effectively identifying, locating, evaluating, designing, preparing and efficiently using educational technology as an instructional resource in the classroom as related to principles of learning and teaching. Candidates will develop increased classroom communication abilities through lectures, discussions, modeling, laboratory experiences, and completion of a comprehensive project.

 

2. Education Department Sequence: This course may be taken in the Junior year or earlier.

 

3. Required Textbooks:  all resources and materials are electronically accessed via LEO.

 

4. Links to the Conceptual Framework: Commitment to Technology: Content is evidence of technology

 

5. Commitment to Diversity: Diverse populations are able to access information via technology equally although perhaps not always equitably due to external factors.

 

6. Field Experience and Student Teaching Requirements: n/a

 

7. Course Objectives           

      The objective and assessment outcomes for this course are aligned with the Conceptual Framework of Lake Erie College, the professional organization.

This course does not simply assume that computers and technologies are good for education and then try to expand the software/hardware tools you master in a semester. Rather, in learning about media and technology in education , the pre-service candidate will:

a. Make educationally justified and responsive choices of when and how to integrate technologies

b. Develop knowledge/skills in the selection, use, and application of technology to support student learning and to advance personal professional development.

c. Demonstrate successful implementation of learning supported by technology

d. Author written work on development of technology supported lessons and research implications involved.

 

8. Lake Erie College Education Division Assessment Data Collected in this Coursen/a

                                         

9. Course Expectations

 


  1. Attendance: The academic program at Lake Erie College operates on the assumption that learning is advanced by regular attendance. It is the responsibility of the student to arrange and make up work, at the convenience of the instructor. The course meets once a week. A student missing a session would be missing a week's worth of work. If you must miss a class, you must notify the professor through email. This absence will be considered excused if it is because of sickness, death of immediate family, or other reasons approved by the college administration. In most cases, graded work for that day may receive full credit.     

 

  1. Academic Dishonesty: Academic dishonesty is a complete betrayal of the mission of Lake Erie College and will be taken seriously. We believe    that a student who has been punished for three separate incidents of academic dishonesty should be expelled from the college. For a complete description of the policies and procedures, please read your college catalog.

 

c.       Disability Statement: Any student having an identified disability must report to the Disabilities Coordinator; it is the student’s responsibility to make this contact and to supply the necessary documentation. As appropriate, special accommodations will be discussed with and arranged by the Disabilities Coordinator.

Both the Student Success Center and the Math and Languages Tutorial Labs support students in all aspects of attaining academic excellence in coursework. Students are encouraged to use these services.


  1. Professional Dispositions: All teacher candidates are expected to demonstrate the professional dispositions adopted by the Lake Erie College Education Division.

 

10. Grading Scale: 

      100-96 A             93-90 B+       83-80 C+        69-67 D+ 

       95-94 A-             89-87 B          79-73 C          66-63 D 

       86-84 B-             72-70 C-         62-60 D           - 59 Fail

 

11. Assignments: see LEO



 

12. Calendar: see LEO



LAKE ERIE COLLEGE EDUCATION DIVISION

“To develop professional, knowledgeable, collaborative, and reflective educators who are committed to the diversity and development of all students.”

 

EDP 304: Integrated Curriculum

Fall 2011

10:30 AM 11:37 AM   

Dr. Linda Siegel

Assistant Professor

College Hall 302

440-375-7160

lsiegel@lec.edu

Office Hours Mondays or by appointment

 

1. Course Description:



      This course will enable teacher education candidates to learn and practice instructional management strategies including classroom management, lesson planning, assessment for instructional planning, materials available for effective instruction, the use of textbooks and supplemental materials, unit planning and the implementation of the Ohio Content Standards for instructional planning.

 

2. Education Department Sequence: This course may be taken in the Junior year or earlier.



 

3. Required Textbooks:  all resources and materials are electronically accessed via LEO

 

4. Links to the Conceptual Framework: 



Standard 2: Teachers know and understand the content area for which they have instructional responsibility. 

2.1 Teachers know the content they teach and use their knowledge of content-area concepts, assumptions and skills to plan instruction.

2.2 Teachers understand and use content-specific instructional strategies to effectively teach the central concepts and skills of the discipline.

2.3 Teachers understand school and district curricula priorities and the Ohio academic content standards.

2.4 Teachers understand the relationship of knowledge within the discipline to other content areas.

2.5 Teachers connect content to relevant life experiences and career opportunities.



Standard 3: Teachers understand and use varied assessments to inform instruction, evaluate and ensure student learning.

3.1 Teachers know about assessment types, their purposes and the data they generate.

3.2 Teachers select, develop and use a variety of diagnostic, formative and summative assessments.

3.3 Teachers analyze data to monitor student progress and learning and to plan, differentiate and modify instruction.

3.4 Teachers collaborate and communicate student progress with students, parents and colleagues.

3.5 Teachers involve learners in self-assessment and goal setting to address gaps between performance and potential.



Standard 4: Teachers plan and deliver instruction that advances the learning of each individual student. 

4.1 Teachers align their instructional goals and activities with school and district priorities and the Ohio academic content standards.

4.2 Teachers use information about students’ learning and performance to plan and deliver instruction that will close the achievement gap.

4.3 Teachers communicate clear learning goals and explicitly link learning activities to those defined goals.

4.4 Teachers apply knowledge of how students think and learn to instructional design and delivery.

4.5 Teachers differentiate instruction to support the learning needs of all students, including students identified as gifted, students with disabilities and at-risk students.

4.6 Teachers create and select activities that are designed to help students develop as independent learners and complex problem-solvers.

4.7 Teachers use resources effectively, including technology, to enhance student learning.

5. Commitment to Diversity: Students experience developing lesson plans and planning appropriate instruction to accommodate various modalities, learning styles and students with diverse intelligences as well as addressing needs of diverse populations.

  

6. Course Objectives 



      This course will focus on the following topics:

         Models for Curriculum Integration

         Aligning Curriculum

         Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy (Anderson)

         Brain-Based Learning

         Multiple Intelligences (MI) Theory

         Integrated Assessment Strategies

         Research regarding integration

 

7. Lake Erie College Education Division Assessment Data Collected in this Course: AYA content lessons long form



                                         

9. Course Expectations/Course Competencies

      This course will focus on the following topics:
   Models of Curriculum

   Aligning Curriculum

   Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy (Anderson)

   Brain-Based Learning

         Multiple Intelligences (MI) Theory

         Assessment Strategies

         Research regarding learning
Upon completion of this course, students are expected to:

1. Identify and define topic concepts,

2. Describe how these topics are fundamental to integrating curriculum,

3. Demonstrate and Apply conceptual understandings to the development of an integrated unit.

 

Grading

      Class Assignments                                                           25%    identify, define & describe

      Integrated Unit- Final Long Form Lesson Plan                75%     develop & demonstrate

     


Class Assignments: Students will complete assignments that are given in class and posted on LEO.

 

Integrated Unit: Students will work both independently and in groups to compose an integrated unit. The unit will consist of all elements of lesson planning in a classroom setting (i.e. lesson plans, artifacts, resources, research findings, models, etc.) A complete description of the criteria of the unit will be discussed in class. Group work will make up 25% of the unit grade and individual work will be 75% of the unit grade.



  1. Attendance: The academic program at Lake Erie College operates on the assumption that learning is advanced by regular attendance. It is the responsibility of the student to arrange and make up work, at the convenience of the instructor. The course meets once a week. A student missing a session would be missing a week's worth of work. If you must miss a class, you must notify the professor through email. This absence will be considered excused if it is because of sickness, death of immediate family, or other reasons approved by the college administration. In most cases, graded work for that day may receive full credit.     

 

  1. Academic Dishonesty: Academic dishonesty is a complete betrayal of the mission of Lake Erie College and will be taken seriously. We believe    that a student who has been punished for three separate incidents of academic dishonesty should be expelled from the college. For a complete description of the policies and procedures, please read your

college catalog.

 

c.       Disability Statement: Any student having an identified disability must report to the Disabilities Coordinator; it is the student’s responsibility to make this contact and to supply the necessary documentation. As appropriate, special accommodations will be discussed with and arranged by the Disabilities Coordinator.



Both the Student Success Center and the Math and Languages Tutorial Labs support students in all aspects of attaining academic excellence in coursework. Students are encouraged to use these services.

  1. Professional Dispositions: All teacher candidates are expected to demonstrate the professional dispositions adopted by the Lake Erie College Education Division.

 

Grading Scale: 

      100-96 A             93-90 B+       83-80 C+        69-67 D+ 

       95-94 A-             89-87 B          79-73 C          66-63 D 

      86-84 B-             72-70 C-         62-60 D           - 59 Fail

 

Assignments: see LEO



 

Calendar: see LEO

 

 

 



LAKE ERIE COLLEGE EDUCATION DIVISION

“To develop professional, knowledgeable, collaborative, and reflective educators who are committed to the diversity and development of all students.”

 

EDP 310: The Pre-Adolescent Adolescent Learner

Instructor: Linda Siegel E-mail:lsiegel@lec.edu

Phone: (office) 375-7384
Course Description: EDP 310 The Pre-Adolescent/Adolescent Learner  3 SH

Prerequisite: PS 101

This course is designed to provide the pre-service teacher with basic understanding of human development beginning in early childhood and focusing on the preadolescent and adolescent student. Teacher candidates will study the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, psychological, and moral characteristics of the early adolescent within the framework of family and social context. Students will examine research findings on the psychological and social development of preadolescent/adolescents and the impact on their learning and performance in school and in society.


Lake Erie College Ed. Dept. Conceptual Framework Professional Development and Professionalism The teacher candidate analyzes past experience and pursues professional development opportunities to improve future performance Knowledge of Content, Pedagogy, and Pedagogical Content The candidate demonstrates knowledge of content, pedagogy, and pedagogical content. Collaboration and Communication The teacher candidate collaborates and communicates with parents/family members, school colleagues, and community members to support student learning and development
Course Competencies:

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to:

1) Acquire an understanding of normal pre-adolescent/adolescent development

2) Identify issues of concerns to contemporary adolescents, especially those related to school

3) Recognize and understand the importance of developing a sense of personal self worth during the adolescent transition

4) Apply this knowledge to the support of student learning in the teaching profession


Knowledge:

Assessment Format Vocabulary test



Skills:

Assessment Format – 1) Presentation (see Rubric for Presentation)

2) Paper (see Rubric for Paper)

Dispositions: Sense of Efficacy

Assessment Format – Presentation (see Rubric for Presentation)


Course Outline: TENTATIVE SCHEDULE notebook is required


Calendar

Process

Assignment

Week One

Introduction, Orientation, Syllabi review (purpose, scope & sequence, competencies/expectancies) Major issues in middle level education

Power Point and text link

Week Two

Who Am I? The Central Question of Adolescence

Face Book

Week Three

Science and Adolescent Development




Week Four

Puberty and Biological Development




Week Five

Cognitive Development




Week Six

The Self, Identity, Emotions, and Personality




Week Seven

Gender, Sexuality




Week Eight

Moral Development, Values, and Spirituality




Week Nine

Families, Peers, School




Week Ten

Families, Peers, School




Week Eleven

Families, Peers, School




Week Twelve

Culture




Week Thirteen

Achievement, Work, and Careers




Week Fourteen

Presentations




Week Fifteen

Presentations






Grading

Evaluation of student achievement includes:

1) Notebook check

2) Rubric for the Presentation

3) Rubric for the Paper

4) Dispositional Orientation Rubric


Grading Scale: 100-96 A 93-90 B+ 83-80 C+ 69-67 D+

95-94 A- 89-87 B 79-73 C 66-63 D

86-84 B- 72-70 C- 62-60 D- 59

ATTENDANCE POLICY: Each student is expected to maintain regular and punctual class attendance.

DISABILITY STATEMENT:

The disability statement that is printed in the Lake Erie College Catalog is applicable to this course. It is the responsibility of the student to seek assistance at the college and to make his/her needs known to Dr. Spiesman, the Director of the Student Success Center (375-7426). The Student Success Center offers both peer and/or professional tutoring in all course/subject areas, as well as assistance in improving personal academic performance. The instructor will assist with accommodations when reasonable and necessary. Instructors are not required to compromise essential elements of the course or the evaluation standards.



PLAGIARISM STATEMENT: Any act of academic dishonesty or cheating by a student seriously impugns the integrity of Lake Erie College and the student; it will not be tolerated. Penalties for academic dishonesty will be imposed at the discretion of the individual faculty member, who may choose to confer with colleagues. Any violation of academic standards may result in penalties up to and including expulsion. Any act of academic dishonesty, plagiarism, or cheating will result in the loss of points for that assignment. Any form of plagiarism may result in receiving zero (0) points for that assignment. This most likely will have an adverse effect on the final grade given for the course. [Source: LEC catalog]

References


Arnett, J. J. (2007). Adolescence and emerging adulthood: A cultural approach (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.

Rice, Philip, F. (1999), The Adolescent: Development, Relationships, and Culture (9th Edition). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

Santrock, John W. (2007). Adolescence, Eleventh Edition. Boston: McGraw-Hill. ISBN: 978-0-

07-313372-0 (soft cover)

LAKE ERIE COLLEGE

“To develop professional, knowledgeable, collaborative, and reflective educators who are committed to the diversity and development of all students.”





EDUCATION DIVISION1

“To develop professional, knowledgeable, collaborative, and reflective educators who are committed to the diversity and development of all students.”



EDE/P/S 312 Field Experience I

Spring 2012

Linda Lanese Kathleen von Tresckow

Barbara Davis Stacey DeYoung

A13 Garfield Center A13 Garfield Center

440-375-7369

bdavis@lec.edu kvontresckow@lec.edu

beachbumbarb@oh.rr.com Kvt1230Gsbcglobal.net

llanese@lec.edu sdeyoung@lec.edu



Office Hours: By Appointment

Mandatory Seminars meet on alternate Mondays

3:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The initial clinical hours of this experience are exploratory. Students will observe in schools, tutor students, and assist teachers or other school personnel. They will become aware of the sociological environment of the school, center or agency as it interrelates to communities and families. Students should attend school/community events and participate as permitted. The remaining hours of the experience are focused and students will demonstrate appropriate developmental instructional methods and strategies for teaching that an intervention specialist is expected to provide. . (Lake Erie College Catalog, 2011-2012)



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT SEQUENCE

The prerequisites for this course are EDC 201, Foundations of Education. This course is part of the Gate A requirements in the Lake Erie College Gates Assessment System.



REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS AND RESOURCES

Lake Erie College Field Experience I Handbook (Spring 2012)

Roe, Betty D., Smith, Sandra H., & Ross, Elinor P.(2010).Student teaching and Field Experiences Handbook. Upper Saddle, New Jersey: Pearson.

www.ode.state.oh.us/ Ohio Department of Education website: Please use this website to access all Ohio Standards for the content areas, sample lesson plans, etc.





COURSE OBJECTIVES

The objective and assessment outcomes for this course are aligned with the Ohio Department of Education Standards for the Teaching Profession, the professional organization (CEC), and the Ohio Academic Content Standards (in Math, Reading/Language Arts, Science, and/or Social Studies).



Standard 1: Teachers understand student learning and development and respect the diversity of students they teach.

1.1 Teachers display knowledge of how students learn and of the developmental characteristics of age groups.

1.3 Teachers demonstrate the expectation that all students will achieve to their full potential.

1.4 Teachers model respect for students’ diverse cultures, language skills and experiences.

1.5 Teachers recognize characteristics of gifted students, students with disabilities and at-risk students in order to assist in appropriate identification, instruction and intervention.

Standard 2: Teachers know and understand the content area for which they have instructional responsibility.

2.1 Teachers know the content they teach and use their knowledge of content-area concepts, assumptions and skills to plan instruction.

2.2 Teachers understand and use content-specific instructional strategies to effectively teach the central concepts and skills of the discipline.

2.3 Teachers understand school and district curricula priorities and the Ohio academic content standards.

2.4 Teachers understand the relationship of knowledge within the discipline to other content areas.

2.5 Teachers connect content to relevant life experiences and career opportunities.



Standard 3: Teachers understand and use varied assessments to inform instruction, evaluate and ensure student learning.

3.1 Teachers know about assessment types, their purposes and the data they generate.



Standard 4: Teachers plan and deliver instruction that advances the learning of each individual student.

4.1 Teachers align their instructional goals and activities with school and district priorities and the Ohio academic content standards.

4.3 Teachers communicate clear learning goals and explicitly link learning activities to those defined goals.

4.4 Teachers apply knowledge of how students think and learn to instructional design and delivery.

4.5 Teachers differentiate instruction to support the learning needs of all students, including students identified as gifted, students with disabilities and at-risk students.

4.6 Teachers create and select activities that are designed to help students develop as independent learners and complex problem-solvers.

4.7 Teachers use resources effectively, including technology, to enhance student learning.

Standard 5: Teachers create learning environments that promote high levels of learning and achievement for all students.

5.1 Teachers treat all students fairly and establish an environment that is respectful, supportive and caring.

5.2 Teachers create an environment that is physically and emotionally safe.

5.3 Teachers motivate students to work productively and assume responsibility for their own learning.

5.4 Teachers create learning situations in which students work independently, collaboratively and/or as a whole class.

5.5 Teachers maintain an environment that is conducive to learning for all students.



Standard 6: Teachers collaborate and communicate with students, parents, and other educators, administrators and the community to support student learning.

6.1 Teachers communicate clearly and effectively.

6.3 Teachers collaborate effectively with other teachers, administrators and school and district staff.

Standard 7: Teachers assume responsibility for professional growth, performance and involvement as an individual and as a member of a learning community.

7.1 Teachers understand, uphold and follow professional ethics, policies and legal codes of professional conduct.



COMMITMENT TO REFLECTION

Lake Eire College’s education division encourages students to reflect on all aspects of their preparation for the teaching profession.. Through curriculum and instruction in the college classroom, as well as field experiences, clinical practice, assessments, and evaluations, candidates are required to reflect on their practice. Through classroom discussion and sharing of their reflections, candidates are able to refine and improve their classroom practices



FIELD EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS

Observation requirements are 75-100 hours. The teacher candidate should begin his/her field experience with a minimum of 25 hours of observation. The next 50+ hours will focus on obtaining experience in the content area. A time log that is signed by the cooperating teacher is turned in at the end of the Seminar to document the observation hours.


The preservice/teacher candidate will teach a minimum of four lessons. Four lessons will be evaluated by the cooperating teacher. Two of the four lessons will be evaluated by the content specialist at Lake Erie College .These observations may be concurrent with both the campus supervisor and the cooperating teacher observing the same lessons. If this is not possible because of scheduling, the student will teach additional lessons.
Copies of all lesson plans and evaluations validated by the cooperating teacher must be turned in to the college supervisor. A copy of the lesson plan should be given to the college supervisor before the lesson is presented.
It is the responsibility of the preservice candidate to schedule these observations. When scheduling times an observation for your campus supervisor, check with your cooperating teacher first! Have a couple dates/times in mind and then ask your college supervisor if they work for him/her. You must inform the cooperating teacher, secretary and principal when your supervisor will be coming to the school. We do not want surprise visits and we do not want you to be gone on a field trip or have the teacher out that day, etc.

LEC EDUCATION DEPARTMENT ASSESSMENT DATA

COLLECTED IN THIS COURSE

  1. The Cooperating Teacher/s will submit to the Field Director

  1. Confirmation of observation and participation hours logged

  2. Final Evaluation of candidate’s dispositions

  3. Final Evaluation of candidate’s performance

  4. Program Evaluation



  1. The Campus Supervisor will submit to the Field Director

  1. Final evaluation of candidate’s dispositions

  2. Final evaluation of candidate’s performance




  1. Key Assessments for any courses the candidate is taking/has taken that require a field experience to complete. This will vary from student to student.

In addition to clinical experiences, the preservice/teacher candidate is required to complete assignments which are a part of the seminar.



.

COURSE EXPECTATIONS

Attendance: Attendance is required for all students in all seminars. Attendance in school has been shown to have a direct impact on student learning. This is not only true in P-12 settings, but also at the college level. Each student is expected to maintain regular and punctual class attendance. Each student is responsible for obtaining class notes and is responsible for all material covered (even if absent). A student's grade will be reduced one letter grade based on the grading rubric on page 7. If you need to miss a scheduled field session in your assigned school you must inform both the cooperating teacher AND your college supervisor. The cooperating teacher and students depend you being there, especially when you are scheduled to teach so DO NOT MISS unless it is absolutely necessary. Then inform all parties.
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