Ohio Board of Regents ls program Review and Development 30 East Broad St., 36 Fl 



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  1. Initial/Early Field Experiences




1. Observations

2. Supervised experiences

3. Method of earning hours (embedded, course base)

4. Documentation of candidate performance by university supervisors, and/or P12 teachers

5. Explain benchmarks or gateways


Describe how the proposed program will meet these minimum expectations and indicate what if any, additional initial field experiences will be included.

Describe how the proposed program will meet these minimum expectations and indicate what if any, additional initial field experiences will be included.


Students completing Gate A and receiving provisional acceptance to the Teacher Preparation Program at Lake Erie College are eligible to take EDP 312, Field Experience I for 2 semester hours credit. Catalog description of EDP 312 is: The initial clinical hours of this experience are exploratory. Students will observe in schools, tutor students and assist teachers or other school personnel. They will become aware of the sociological environment of the school, center or agency as it interrelates to communities and families. Students should attend school/community events and participate as permitted. The remaining hours of the experience are focused and students will demonstrate appropriate developmental instructional methods and strategies for teaching across the curriculum. The prerequisite to this course is EDC 201 Foundations of Education. Students are assigned a campus supervisor who supports them throughout the experience with visits to the school, observations of lessons taught, and by conducting on campus seminars for instructional purposes. Students are required to spend 75-100 clock hours in the field experience. Both cooperating teachers (P-12) and campus supervisors evaluate lessons taught using the LEC evaluation form. Data collected is utilized in decision making regarding program improvement. For further information regarding Field Experience I see the student field handbook http://www.lec.edu/teac/






  1. More Intensive Field Experiences




  1. All experiences are supervised

  2. Experiences during methods block should be at least 60 hours.

  3. Additional hours should range between 10-30 hours.

  4. Must include documentation of how hours were earned.

  5. Documentation of candidate performance by university supervisors and P12 teachers

  6. Documentation that experiences are within the reading core, including AYA and multi-age programs.

Describe how the proposed program will meet these minimum expectations and indicate what if any, additional initial field experiences will be included.

Describe how the proposed program will meet these minimum expectations and indicate what if any, additional initial field experiences will be included.



Students successfully completing EDP 312, Field I may enroll in EDP 412, Field Experience II. The catalog description for EDP 412 is: This field is an intensive experience through which students will demonstrate their abilities to plan and execute lessons in social studies, science, reading, language arts, mathematics, health and fine arts. They will demonstrate the use of technology in teaching and learning episodes. Students should be given the opportunity to practice in inclusive clinical settings that reflect culturally, linguistically and academically diverse systems. Students are assigned a campus supervisor who supports them throughout the experience with visits to the school, observations of lessons taught, and by conducting on campus seminars for instructional purposes. Students are required to spend 75 clock hours in the field experience. Both cooperating teachers (P-12) and campus supervisors evaluate lessons taught using the LEC evaluation form. Data collected is utilized in decision making regarding program improvement. For further information regarding Field Experience II see the student field handbook http://www.lec.edu/teac/



  1. Clinical Practice/Student Teaching




  1. All experiences are supervised

  2. Minimum of twelve weeks, including at least four consecutive weeks of full-time teaching responsibility (planning, implementing, learning, activities, assessments)

  3. Includes a minimum of three face-to face observations by university supervisors using Ohio Standards for the Teaching profession assessments reflecting on the cycle.

  4. Documentation of 3 observations of candidate performance by university supervisors and cooperating teachers.

  5. Additional specific assessments determined by the proposed program (action research, case study, teacher work samples)

Describe how the proposed program will meet these minimum expectations and indicate what if any, additional initial field experiences will be included.
Teacher candidates enroll in clinical practice in their final semester. They are required to spend 15 weeks in an appropriate setting according to their licensure area. Candidates are placed with cooperating teachers assigned by the school district with collaboration from the Lake Erie College Field Director. Although candidates may vary in their readiness to take on the entire classroom responsibilities, they begin by teaching one or two areas/courses and building until they are teaching the full load no later than the fourth week of their experience. The candidate continues teaching the full load until the end of the semester. Campus supervisors and cooperating teachers use the same criteria for evaluating performance. Campus supervisors make a minimum of 8 visits and complete 8 evaluations. Cooperating teachers also conduct 8 evaluations. Campus supervisors assist students in understanding the expectations of the Teacher Performance Assessment which includes action research, case study, and teacher




Field Experiences and Clinical Practice Hours




Must have 100 hours during these two areas







Initial/Early Field Experiences

More Intensive Field Experiences

Clinical Practice/Student Teaching [12 wks]

PROVIDE THE ACTUAL NUMBER OF HOURS IN THESE TWO TYPES OF FIELD EXPERIENCES



75-100

75





INDICATE WITH A CHECKMARK WHETHER THE TOPICS BELOW ARE ADDRESSED WITHIN ANY OR ALL OF THE THREE CATEGORIES OF FIELD EXPERIENCES AND CLINICAL PRACTICE COLUMNS






















Academic Language







Aligning Content Standards & Instruction







Assessing Student Learning







Classroom and School Diversity







Classroom Management







Content Methods







English Language Learners







Learner Growth and Development







Lesson Planning







Professional Growth







Reading Instruction







Subject Specific Pedagogy







Technology Instruction/Integration










Qualifications of Mentor Teachers

How does the proposed program ensure that all candidates have qualified and diverse clinical educators, coaches and mentors during field experiences and clinical practice? Explain the criteria you use [in addition to these minimum requirements: three years of successful teaching focused in the field and the recommendation and/or approval by a building administrator] to ensure mentors are well prepared.

Lake Erie College submits requests for mentor teachers to the school districts. Usually one person in the district offices is designated to work with Colleges and University in placing students. Our expectations include: highly qualified, Master’s Degree, successfully completed the requisite number of years in Middle Grades. Lake Erie College offers an orientation for all mentor teachers at the beginning of the semester and a wrap-up session at the conclusion of the semester. Campus supervisors who are well acquainted with the expectations of the program make frequent visits and are available “on-call” should problems arise. Lake Erie College employs a full time faculty member as Field Director who interacts with the community and is responsible to work with the schools to place students in appropriate places in both public and approved private schools. In addition to that, Lake Erie College employs a full time faculty member to oversee the campus supervisors, oversee implementation of the Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA), guide the seminar curriculum, work with students in the field, and connect with teachers and administrators.

Student Teaching Placements

How are student teachers placed? Describe the criteria you will use when selecting a school district and your criteria for selecting cooperating teachers.

Lake Erie College employs a full time faculty member as Field Director who interacts with the community and is responsible to work with the schools to place students in appropriate placements in both public and approved private schools. In addition the field director oversees the campus supervisors, plans orientation and professional development for cooperating teachers and campus supervisors, oversees implementation of the Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA), guides the seminar curriculum, works with students in the field, and connects with teachers and administrators.
Lake Erie College submits requests for mentor teachers to the school districts. Usually one administrator in the district offices is designated to work with Colleges and University in placing students. Our expectations for cooperating teachers include: highly qualified teachers with a Master’s Degree and appropriate licensure and those who have successfully completed the requisite number of years in Middle Grades.
LEC provides opportunities for students to work in a variety of schools. The College is located in Lake County which includes populations that are diverse ethnically, culturally, racially, economically, and socially. The schools reflect this diversity offering LEC students a wide variety of classroom environments. In addition to Lake County LEC also places students in Ashtabula, Geauga, and parts of Cuyahoga County. These counties also reflect a wide variety of families from all socio-economic levels.

Attachment A

Middle Childhood Course Syllabi

Lake Erie College

Education Department

Course Syllabus

Department and Course #: EDC 201

Course Title: Foundations of Education

Course Meeting Times: Mon/Wed/Fri 1:00-1:50

Academic Term: FALL 2011

Academic Division: Education

Office Phone: 440-375-7376
Instructor: Professor Matthew Theisen

Classroom: Garfield Center B21

Office Location: Garfield Center Office A9

Email: mtheisen@lec.edu

Office Hours: Mon/Wed: 9:30-11:30 AM

Tues/Thurs 2:00-3:00 PM

Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch excellence.”

-Vince Lombardi

Course Description:

This course explores historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations of education. Students will critically examine issues in education, past and present, while developing specific, enhanced qualities that will serve them as future educators. The course will use the community as a classroom by utilizing area educators as guest speakers.
Course Sequence:

EDC 201 is required of all Education Majors and is an introductory level class. Successful completion of the class with a grade of “C” or better is required for admittance to the Education Program at Lake Erie College.



LEARNING OBJECTIVES

            Learning as Knowledge

The student will:


  • Demonstrate knowledge of the historical and philosophical foundations of education

  • Discuss social, political, economic, and legal issues that shape and influence education

  • Compare and contrast varying educational philosophies, teaching methods, and learner styles

  • Identify contributions of major theorists and how they shaped public education


Learning as Process

The student will:



  • Demonstrate an understanding of the material studied through assignments, class discussions, and class presentations.

  • Develop and compose a personal philosophy of education for inclusion in interview portfolio

Dispositions

The student will:



  • Evaluate one’s own abilities and attitudes and how they may predict success in the educational profession

  • Reflect upon the expectations and demands of the teaching profession , including punctuality, attendance, flexibility, confidentiality, integrity, cooperation, initiative, and professional appearance and demeanor.

  • Comprehend and display the Education Department’s dispositions

Tentative Academic Schedule

Date

Lecture Topics – Reading assignments are expected to be done for the following week’s classes!

Week 1 – Aug. 22

Review syllabus

Grading criteria

Requirements – Attendance, Late Work

Plagiarism hand-out

Explain concept of “essential question” and Socratic seminar style

Assignment:    Assign Autobiography

Pass out Education Department Handbooks- Review handbooks and program requirements.


Week 2 - Aug. 29

Topic : World Roots of Education
ASSIGNMENT: Chapter 3 Ornstein pp 56-91

Assign Famous Educator Research Paper and Presentation

Autobiography paper due


Week 3 – Sept. 5

Monday – Labor Day – NO CLASS
Topic: Pioneers in Education

ASSIGNMENT: Chapter 4 Ornstein pp 96-124

Reminder: Famous Educator Paper and Presentations due next week


Week 4 – Sept. 12

All Week: Famous Educator Presentations

Week 5 – Sept. 19

Topic: American Education part I

Wednesday – Guest Speaker

Friday-1 page reflection paper due on speaker presentation

ASSIGNMENT: Chapter 5 Ornstein pp 127-162



Week 6 - Sept. 26

Topic: American Education part II

Reading: Chapter 5 Ornstein pp127-162



Week 7 - Oct. 3

Monday: Review for midterm exam

Wednesday: Guest Speaker

Friday : Midterm Exam 150 points

1 page reflection paper due on speaker presentation



Week 8 – Oct. 10

Topic: Philosophical Foundations part I

ASSIGNMENT: Chapter 6 Ornstein pp165-203

Assign Group Presentations

Friday: Fall Break



Week 9 – Oct. 17

Topic: Philosophical Foundations part II

Monday: Guest Speaker  

Wednesday and Friday: Group Presentations Due

ASSIGNMENTS: 1 page reflection paper on speaker due on Wednesday

Assign Personal Philosophy of Education Paper 3-5 pages


Week 10 – Oct. 24

Topic: Governance/Administration

Monday: Guest Speaker

ASSIGNMENTS: Chapter 7 Ornstein pp. 208-234

1 page reflection paper on speaker presentation due on Weds.

Reminder: Personal Philosophy of Education Paper due on Monday


Week 11 – Oct. 31

Topic: Financing Public Education

Monday: Guest Speaker

ASSIGNMENTS: Chapter 8 Ornstein pp235-258

1 page reflection paper on speaker due on Wednesday



Week 12 – Nov. 7

Topic: Legal Aspects part I

Senate Bill 153 Hand-out

Wednesday : Guest Speaker

ASSIGNMENTS: Chapter 9 Ornstein pp 259-301

1 page reflection paper on speaker due on Friday



Week 13 – Nov 14

Topic: Legal Aspects part II

Recent Education Court Case Hearings and Rulings Hand-out

Monday: Final Guest Speaker

Assignments: Final Reflection Paper on speaker due on Weds..



Week 14 - Nov 21

Monday : Observe LEAD classroom

Wednesday and Friday: Thanksgiving Break



Week 15 - Nov 28

Monday: Live Skype w/ Guest Educator in Dhaka, Bangladesh

Final exam study guide and review

Friday: Last Day of Class-view sample portfolios


Week 16 - Dec 5

Final Exam: 1:00 -3:00pm

INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES

Including but not limited to:



  • Lectures                                                          

  • Demonstrations

  • Student Presentations

  • Guest Speakers

REQUIRED TEXT

Ornstein, A.C., and D.U. Levine. (2011) Foundations of Education. 11th ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin



FERPA: Please be aware that due to the “Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act” (FERPA) of 1974 your professor may NOT discuss with your parents any information related to your grades, classroom performance or personal conduct at LEC. If you WISH us to be able to discuss your personal performance in this class with your parents or guardian, you must sign a specific FERPA RELEASE. This may be DIFFERENT from any release form signed related to sports activities on campus. Please discuss issues related to FERPA or FERPA RELEASES with the Registrar.
DISABILITY STATEMENT

The disability statement that is printed in the Lake Erie College Catalog is applicable to this course. It is the responsibility of the student to seek assistance at the college and to make his/her needs known to Dr. Spiesman, the Director of the Student Success Center (375-7426). The Student Success Center offers both peer and/or professional tutoring in all course/subject areas, as well as assistance in improving personal academic performance. The instructor will assist with accommodations when reasonable and necessary. Instructors are not required to compromise essential elements of the course or the evaluation standards.


ACADEMIC SERVICES
The Lake Erie College Learning Center serves as a focal point, within the academic community, for the creation and promotion of an enriched learning environment where all students have an opportunity to fulfill their academic potential. The Learning Center is coordinated through the Office of Academic Services. The following are some of the services available for students at Lake Erie College:



  • Pre/post admission counseling

  • Registration support 

  • Academic advising and monitoring

  • Readers, Scribes and / or test proctors

  • Assistance in connecting with community agencies

  • Subject specific tutorial service

Lake Erie College has developed policies concerning students with disabilities. Lake Erie College will:

  • Conform to the applicable federal, state and college / university policies, regulations and definitions regarding students with disabilities,

  • Provide services that comply with external and internal policies and laws to qualified students through the services of the Learning Center.

  • Uphold academic standards in the context of these policies and services.

  • Commit its departments and faculty to making reasonable modifications of programs and courses for students with disabilities.

  • Require students to provide or cooperate in providing necessary documentation in order to be eligible to receive services.

  • Assist qualified students with disabilities in obtaining reasonable accommodations.

  • Maintain legally appropriate confidentiality for students with disabilities.

Additional questions related to disability coordination or tutorial services should be directed to the Coordinator, Academic Services.



GRADING CRITERIA

  • Attendance:  Students are expected to be in class.  Excused absences require a note from a doctor for illness or injury only.  For every two (2) UNEXCUSED absences your grade will drop by one letter grade.

  • Late assignments will not be accepted.

  • Exams must be completed on the scheduled day and time.

  • No cell phones in class.


Class Component

Points

Autobiography Paper

25

Famous Educator Research Paper

50

Famous Educator Presentation

50

Midterm Exam

100

Educational Philosophies Group Presentations

50

7 One Page Reflection Papers

140 (20 points each)

Participation

25

Final Exam

150

TOTAL POSSIBLE

590


Grading System

Letter Grade

Percentage Points

Letter Grade




A

93-100

4.00

Excellent

A-

90-92

3.70




B+

88-89

3.30




B

83-87

3.00

Good

B-

80-82

2.70




C+

78-79

2.30




C

73-77

2.00

Satisfactory

C-

70-72

1.70




D+

68-69

1.30




D

63-67

1.00

Passing

D-

60-62

0.70




F

<60

0.00

Failing

I*




0.00

Incomplete

WP







Withdrew Passing

WF







Withdrew Failing

Expectations for classroom conduct: It is this professor’s goal to make the classroom an environment where students can flourish. Gossiping and interpersonal disputes will not be tolerated. A positive attitude includes a willingness to learn and try new ideas, participation in class discussions and question and answer periods, as well as a consistent work ethic shown steadily throughout the semester. It is expected that respect will be shown towards the all instructors, horses, and fellow students. Students shall not engage in inappropriate verbal, physical or psychological contact or confrontation with another students or college employees, including through the use of social media systems. Students shall not engage in unprofessional conduct found to be offensive or detrimental to the individual, the college or other students. If disrespect is shown in any sphere, the student will be dismissed from the instructional environment for the day.
Disruptive Behavior: It is the obligation of the student to conduct him/herself in a manner that does not disrupt or interfere with the conduct of this class. Student behavior in the classroom shall be conducive to the teaching and learning process for all concerned. Any student whose conduct adversely affects the learning environment in this classroom will be asked to change his/her behavior. If that student continues to be disruptive, he/she will be asked to leave the classroom. Further disruption of the class may result in the student being expelled from the course.
Electronic devices: All cell phones must be silenced or left out of the classroom environment. Texting, reading text messages, checking emails, FaceBook or Twittering or other use of social media during class is viewed by your professor as an act of disrespect during class and will result in immediate expulsion from the classroom for that day. Laptop computers are welcome in the classroom as long as their use is not disruptive to the instructional environment and your classmates around you. Computer use is RESTRICTED to the topic of discussion at the time. Reading emails, checking FaceBook, Twittering, playing games or otherwise occupying yourself on your computer with concerns NOT under current discussion is viewed by your professor as an act of disrespect during class and will result in immediate expulsion from the classroom for that day.
ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

Any act of academic dishonesty, plagiarism or cheating by students seriously impugns the integrity of the College and is unacceptable. Some examples of plagiarism include, but are not limited to: failure to acknowledge the source(s) of even a few phrases, sentences, paragraphs, or major sections or passages in the paper or project. Failure to acknowledge the source(s) of a major idea is considered plagiarism as well. Cheating consists of giving or receiving unauthorized help before, during or after an exam; looking upon someone else’s exam during the exam period; intentionally allowing another student to look upon one’s exam; the unauthorized discussion of test items during the exam period; and the passing of any exam information to students who have not yet taken the exam are some examples. Other acts of academic dishonesty may include: submitting substantial portions of the same work for credit more than once, without prior consent of the instructor; forging another person’s signature on academic or other official documents; or collaborating on projects, papers or other academic exercises if regarded as inappropriate by the instructor. Anyone caught cheating or plagiarizing will be given an F for the coursework.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Adler, M. (2000) How to Think About the Great Ideas. Chicago: Carus Publishing.

Adler, M. (1981) Six Great Ideas. New York: Macmillan Publishing.

Das, L. (2011) Buddha Standard Time. New York: Harper Collins.

Esquith, R (2007) Teach Like your Hair’s on Fire. New York: Viking.

Gruwell, E. (1999) The Freedom Writers Diary. New York: Broadway Books.



Gruwell, E. (2007) Teach with your Heart. New York: Broadway Books.

“To develop professional, knowledgeable, collaborative, and reflective educators who are committed to the diversity and development of all students.”



EDC 225 Voices of Diversity

Spring 2012

Days & Time: MWF 8-8:50 AM, Bldg & Room.: Garfield B-11

Instructor’s Name: Dr. Ritu Sharma

Instructor’s Title: Assistant Professor

Instructor’s Office Building & Room: College Hall 205

Instructor’s Phone Number: 440-375-7158

Instructor’s E-Mail Address: rsharma@lec.edu

Office Hours: M/W 8:50-9:30 am, 10:45-11:45 am, F 8:50-11:40 am and by appointment

1. Course Description: Voices of Diversity coursework will support pre-service teachers in developing proficiencies to work with students from diverse backgrounds to ensure that all students have the opportunity to learn. This course will provide the opportunity to explore personal values and attitudes toward diversity. The theoretical component will examine the issues of diversity in the classroom. Field experience and examination of educational materials will enhance the students’ understanding of diversity. The course will help the pre-service candidate to develop a reflective understanding of themselves as individuals in a diverse community of learners. They will examine collective common experiences that may typically affect the learning processes of diverse groups.

2. Education Department Sequence: This course falls under the introductory level for the Education Dept.

3. Required Textbooks: Bell, Myrtle P. (2007). Diversity in Organizations, Thomson Higher Education.

http://www.tolerance.org/teach/activities/activity.jsp?ar=800&pa=2

http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/diet.fitness/01/30/obesity.report/index.html

http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/homework/religion/calendar.htm

https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/demo/

4. Course Objectives:

The objective and assessment outcomes for this course are aligned with the Conceptual Framework of Lake Erie College, the professional organization (NAEYC, NMSA, etc.), and the Ohio Academic Content Standards (in Math, Reading/Language Arts, Science, and/or Social Studies).


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to:

Knowledge:

1. Identify, and define your own individual values, beliefs, and biases regarding issues of diversity.

2. Describe how these values, beliefs, and biases may affect skills as a professional teacher.

3. Demonstrate an understanding of major conceptualizations regarding diversity as demonstrated through class presentation.

4. Apply these understandings to the classroom and its connected community. (i.e. staff, students, parents, etc.)

Skills:


  1. Project Implicit collection of 15 demonstration tests

  2. Assessment Format – 1) Presentation (see Rubric for Presentation)

2) Paper (see Rubric for Paper)

Dispositions: Sense of Efficacy

Assessment Format – Presentation (see Rubric for Presentation)



5. Links to the Conceptual Framework:

Professionalism - The teacher candidate analyzes past experience and pursues professional development opportunities to improve future performance. Knowledge able - The candidate demonstrates knowledge of content, pedagogy, and pedagogical content. Collaborative and Reflective - The teacher candidate collaborates and communicates with parents/family members, school colleagues, and community members to support student learning and development. The course will help the pre-service candidate to develop a reflective understanding of themselves as individuals in a diverse community of learners. They will examine collective common experiences that may typically affect the learning processes of diverse groups.


6. Commitment to Reflection: The candidates will be expected to reflect on their practices to refine and improve their classroom practices as it is an integral part of the curriculum and assessment.

7. Field Experience and Student Teaching Requirements (not applicable): A statement of the number of required hours, the level of the field experience, a list of activities and/or assignment expectations, supervision procedures, and assessments that will take place in the field. Include any policies you have for unsatisfactory completion of the field experiences or student teaching.

  1. Lake Erie College Education Division Assessment Data Collected in this Course: In this course, assessments and data collection are required to meet requirements for ODE or national accreditation approval.


9. Course Expectations

a. Attendance: Attendance is required for all students in all classes. Attendance in school has been shown to have a direct impact on student learning. This is not only true in P-12 settings, but also at the college level. Each student is expected to maintain regular and punctual class attendance. Each student is responsible for obtaining class notes and is responsible for all material covered (even if absent). A student's grade will be reduced one letter grade for more than one (1) missed classes. Your attendance at every class is expected and required (and being here “in body” doesn’t necessarily mean you are “here”; active participation is a must, and sleeping, doing work/studying for other classes, instant messaging, clockwatching, personal grooming, and other inattentive behaviors are not welcome). As a courtesy to me and to your classmates, turn off all cell phones, pagers, etc. before class begins.
Texting/IMing/Surfing in class is unacceptable under any circumstances—if a situation arises that demands your attention you should not be in the classroom. Disruptive behavior will not be allowed. Every violation of this policy after first warning results in a recorded absence for the day.

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