News Anchor / Presenter



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News Anchor / Presenter


“ A news Anchor or presenter is a person that presents a news show on television, radio or the Internet. The term is not commonly used by people in the industry as they tend to use more descriptive, and sometimes country-specific, terms. Examples include "newsreader", "newscaster", and "news anchor".

Different roles:

Newscaster


A newscaster is a presenter of a news bulletin who is himself or herself a working journalist and news gatherer, and a participant in compiling the script to be delivered in a news bulletin.

The American use of the term is presumed to have been coined in the 1980s to distinguish active journalists from newsreaders, the previous type of news presenter.

However in the UK, ITN's presenters are referred to as newscasters (and have been since the 1950s), whilst those working at the BBC are called newsreaders.

A newscaster is a presenter of a news bulletin who is himself or herself a working journalist and news gatherer, and a participant in compiling the script to be delivered in a news bulletin.

The American use of the term is presumed to have been coined in the 1980s to distinguish active journalists from newsreaders, the previous type of news presenter.

However in the UK, ITN's presenters are referred to as newscasters (and have been since the 1950s), whilst those working at the BBC are called newsreaders.


News anchor


A news anchor is a television personality who presents material prepared for a news program and at times must improvise commentary for live presentation. The term is primarily used in the United States and Canada. Many news anchors are also involved in writing and/or editing the news for their programs. Sometimes news anchors interview guests and moderate panels or discussions. Some provide commentary for the audience during parades and other events.

The term anchor (sometimes anchorperson, anchorman, or anchorwoman) was coined by CBS News producer Don Hewitt. CBS cites its first usage as being on July 7, 1952 to describe Walter Cronkite's role at the Democratic and Republican National Conventions. According to Hewitt, the term was in reference to the "anchor leg" of a relay race.

A news anchor is a television personality who presents material prepared for a news program and at times must improvise commentary for live presentation. The term is primarily used in the United States and Canada. Many news anchors are also involved in writing and/or editing the news for their programs. Sometimes news anchors interview guests and moderate panels or discussions. Some provide commentary for the audience during parades and other events.

Qualities of a Good News Anchor:


  1. Well groomed personality/Pleasing Personality/confident

  2. Sound Knowledge on various subjects (politics, international relation, business, sports, Entertainment wrold etc.)

  3. Journalistic skills

  4. Good communication skill

  5. Command over language & Pronunciation

  6. Photogenic face

  7. Good voice Quality

  8. Well versed with Newsroom & Studio Environment

Do’s & Don’ts

  1. Always carry your Hard Copy of your News bulletin/progammes

  2. Go through scripts/achor script 2-3 times before reding the News

  3. Dress according to the channel Dresscode and Situation

  4. Get fresh (washroom)/take water before enteering the studio.

  5. Television news / Programmes

Television news refers to the practice of disseminating current events via the medium of television. News Bulletins are programmes lasting from seconds to hours that provide updates on world, national, regional or local news events. Television channels may provide news bulletins as part of a regular program that is aired daily or more often at standard times. Less often, television shows may be interrupted or replaced by "news flashes" to provide news updates on current events of great importance or sudden events of great importance.

A newscast typically consists of the coverage of various news events and other information, either produced locally by a radio or television station newsroom, or by a broadcast network. It may also include such additional material as sports coverage, weather forecasts, traffic reports, commentary and other material that the broadcaster feels is relevant to their audience.

In some parts of the world there are 'rolling news' TV channels that broadcast news 24 hours a day.

Television news consists of several different elements, introduced by a news presenter or presenters. The presenters read 'links' and do interviews.

Most news stories come in the form of short 'packages'. These are pre-recorded reports usually lasting from one to five minutes. News reporters gather and edit together interview clips, pictures and their own 'pieces to camera' to tell a story. They script and record a 'voice-over' to explain the pictures and link the elements together.

Some stories are done as live reports. This can be a reporter on the scene of a story either being interviewed by a studio presenter (sometimes known as a 'two-way'), a reporter interviewing one or more other people, or simply live pictures and sound of an event. The sound and pictures are sent back to the TV station via fixed cable links, bounced off a satellite from a vehicle carrying a satellite dish (a 'sat truck'), or sent through microwave radio transmissions from a vehicle carrying a microwave transmitter. With the growth of "rolling news" channels the use of live material has increased enormously and TV reporters are now often judged as much on their ability to perform live in front of a camera as on their package-making or writing skills.

TV news programs are put together by producers, who decide what goes in and what gets left out, and how long and in what form each story is presented. They put together 'running orders' - a list of the stories in what they decide is the right order.

A separate news editor is often responsible for co-ordinating the gathering of material.


Television program


A television programme or simply television show is a segment of programming in television broadcasting. It may be a one-off broadcast or, more usually, part of a periodically returning television series. A television series that is intended to air a finite number of episodes is usually called a series or serial.

A single instance of a program is called an episode, although this is sometimes also called a "show" or "program." A one-off broadcast may be called a "special". A television movie ("made-for-TV" movie) is a movie that is initially aired on television rather than being released in theaters or direct-to-video, although many successful television movies are later released on video.

Today, advertisements play a role in most television programming, such that each hour of programming contains approximately 20 minutes of commercials. However, this is not the case for pay channels such as HBO and Showtime. Similarly, being publicly funded, the BBC in the United Kingdom does not run advertisements, except to trail (promote) its own output, much like the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) in the United States and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) in Australia. With rise of internet video clips, there is serious debate about where the future of television programs is going.

TV Program content:


The content of television programs may be factual, as in documentaries, news, and reality television, or fictional as in comedy and drama. It may be topical as in the case of news and some made-for-television movies or historical as in the case of such documentaries or fictional series. It may be primarily instructional as in the case of educational programming, or entertaining as is the case in situation comedy, reality TV, and variety shows, or for income as advertisements.

A drama program usually features a set of actors in a somewhat familiar setting. The program follows their lives and their adventures. Many shows, especially before the 1980s, maintained a status quo where the main characters and the premise changed little. If some change happened to the characters lives during the episode, it was usually undone by the end. (Because of this, the episodes could usually be watched in any order.) Since the 1980s, there are many series that feature progressive change to the plot, the characters, or both.

Common TV program periods include regular broadcasts (like TV news), TV series (usually seasonal and ongoing with a duration of only a few episodes to many seasons), or TV miniseries which is an extended film, usually with a small pre-determined number of episodes and a set plot and timeline. Miniseries usually range from about 3 to 10 hours in length, though critics often complain when programs hit the short end of that range and are still marketed as "minis." In the UK, the term "miniseries" is only usually used in references to imported programmes, and such short-run series are usually called "serials" there.

Older American television shows began with a title sequence, showed opening credits at the bottom of the screen during the beginning of the show, and included closing credits at the end of the show. However, beginning in the 1990s some shows began with a "cold open," followed by a title sequence and a commercial break. Many serialistic shows begin with a "Previously on..." introduction before the teaser. And, to save time, some shows omit the title sequence altogether, folding the names normally featured there into the opening credits. The title sequence has not been completely eliminated, however, as many major television series still use them in 2007.

While television series appearing on TV networks are usually commissioned by the networks themselves, their producers earn greater revenue when the program is sold into syndication. With the rise of the DVD home video format, box sets containing entire seasons or the complete run of a program have become a significant revenue source as well.

Scripted entertainment


  • Dramatic television series (including dramedy, police procedural, serial drama, science-fiction, or soap operas) or Television comedy (typically situation comedy or sketch comedy)

  • Animated television series

  • Miniseries and TV Movies

  • Award shows

Unscripted entertainment


  • Talk shows

  • Reality television

  • Game shows

Informational

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