mu1040 (B) mu1041 Harmony I (Junior Freshmen)



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Music
The Music Department regularly hosts visiting students. All students considering attending modules in Music are advised to contact the department executive officer before completing their application. This is to ensure that their choice of module(s) is suitable for them, and in particular to consider prerequisite experience. For example, all modules in the department require some ability to read music, and are designed for students specialising in music. Senior Freshmen and Sophister courses are especially likely to require prior experience (mostly in the form of musical literacy, which is why an enquiry to the department first is essential).
Music Department's Executive Officer: Ms Gráinne Redican - musicsec@tcd.ie
(A) MU1040 (B) MU1041 Harmony I (Junior Freshmen)
Module coordinator: Simon Trezise

Duration: Michaelmas & Hilary Terms

Contact hours p/w: One one-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: (A) weekly assignments (40%), 3-hour examination (60%); (B) weekly assignments.

Weighting: (A) 10 (B) 5 ECTS

Prerequisite: music theory

Objectives: Through this module students receive a thorough grounding in the underlying principles of common-practice harmony, and in the principles of melodic coordination that have been the 'industry standard' for composers of ensemble music since c. 1450. Students who successfully pass the module will be equipped 1) to produce a straightforward chorale-type harmonisation, and 2) to distinguish between chromatic passing notes and modulation, essential and inessential notes.
(A) MU1042 (B) MU1043 Counterpoint I (Junior Freshmen)
Module coordinator: Andrew Johnstone

Duration: Michaelmas & Hilary Terms

Contact hours p/w: One one-hour lectures once a week

Assessment: RUDIMENTS (A/B) Examination (100%, pass or fail). (A) one coursework assessment in each of the first three species (10% each), one 3-hour examination on all the first three species (60%) (B) one coursework assessment in each of the first three species (33.3% each).

Weighting: (A) 10 (B) 5 ECTS

Prerequisite: music theory

Objectives: Through this module students receive a thorough grounding in the conventions of manuscript and printed music notation, in the principles of intervals and transposition. Students who successfully pass the course will be equipped 1) to write out and describe all musical intervals, scales and key signatures (in any clef and with any time signature), 2) to write out any piece of music in a different key, 3) to read and write parts for transposing instruments, 4) to write correctly one, two, and four notes against each semibreve of a cantus firmus.
(A) MU2042 (B) MU2043 Counterpoint II (Senior Freshmen)
Module coordinator: Andrew Johnstone

Duration: Michaelmas & Hilary Terms

Contact hours p/w: One one-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: (A) four assessments (10% each); one 3-hour examination (60% each); (B) four assessments (25% each)

Weighting: (A) 10 (B) 5 ECTS

Prerequisite: Counterpoint I

Objectives: Two-part polyphonic procedures covered in the JF year are extended to encompass the freer rhythms of fifth-species counterpoint and the form of fugue.
(A) MU2032 (B) MU 2033 Harmony II A & B (Senior Freshmen)
Module coordinator: Simon Trezise

Duration: Michaelmas & Hilary Terms.

Contact hours: One one-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: (A) weekly assignments (40%), 3-hour examination (60%); (B) weekly assignments.

Weighting: (A) 10 (B) 5 ECTS

Prerequisite: Harmony I

Objectives: To extend the practices and vocabulary of Harmony I to incorporate a wider range of practice and vocabulary, including chromaticism and dissonance.
(A) MU1044 (B) MU1045 History and Repertoire I (Junior Freshmen)
Module coordinator: Martin Adams

Duration: Michaelmas & Hilary Terms

Contact hours p/w: One two-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: (A) 4 essays (12.5% each) and 4 listening tests (12.5% each); (B) 2 essays (25% each) and 2 listening tests (25% each)

Weighting: (A) 10 (B) 5 ECTS

Prerequisite: music theory

Objectives: To introduce students to the evolution of forms and styles in the historical period comprised within c. 1580 and the end of the 18th century; to develop students' knowledge of the relevant repertoire through the analysis and comment on scores, texts and other sources, with emphasis on cultural and historical contexts.
(A) MU2034 (B) MU2035 History and Repertoire II (Senior Freshmen)
Module coordinator: Simon Trezise & Martin Adams

Duration: Michaelmas & Hilary Terms

Contact hours p/w: One two-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: (A) 4 essays (12.5% each) and 4 listening tests (12.5% each); (B) 2 essays (25% each) and 2 listening tests (25% each)

Weighting: (A) 10 (B) 5 ECTS

Prerequisite: music theory

Objectives: To gain an awareness of major compositional trends in the nineteenth century, through a study of the following topics: 1. instrumental and orchestral music from Haydn to Beethoven; 2. the Romantic symphony; 3. nationalist trends in the music of France and Russia in the later nineteenth century; 4. the Lied and instrumental forms of the Romantic period; 5. explorations in Romantic opera.
(A) MU3020 (B) MU3031 History and Repertoire III (Junior Sophisters)
Module coordinator: Michael Taylor

Duration: Michaelmas & Hilary Terms

Contact hours p/w: One two-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: 4 listening tests (12.5% each) and examination (50%); (B) 2 listening tests (25% each) and examination (50%)

Weighting: (A) 15 (B) 10 ECTS

Prerequisite: music theory

Objectives: To gain an awareness of major compositional trends of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, through the examination of key works: 1. Vienna — Mahler to atonality; 2. From Debussy to the early avant-garde; 3. Stravinsky, Bartók and Sibelius; 4. Post-1945 composition.
(A) MU4030 (B) MU4031 History and Repertoire IV (Senior Sophisters)
Module coordinator: Andrew Johnstone

Duration: Michaelmas & Hilary Terms

Contact hours p/w: One two-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: (A) 4 essays (12.5% each) and 4 listening tests (12.5% each); (B) 2 essays (25% each) and 2 listening tests (25% each)

Weighting: (A) 15 (B) 10

Prerequisite: music theory

Objectives: This module examines some of the most significant tendencies in music before 1600. A number of genres and works of seminal importance are examined in detail, and with regard to their cultural context. Theoretical developments, and the development of musicology on the period are also surveyed.
(A) MU2040 (B) MU2041 Introduction to Musicology (Senior Freshman)
Module coordinator: Martin Adams

Duration: Michaelmas & Hilary Terms

Contact hours p/w: One one-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: (A) two equally weighted essays; (B) one essay

Weighting: (A) 10 (B) 5 ECTS

Prerequisite: none

Objectives: To introduce students to the principles of source studies and editing practice, through case studies and practical exercises; to develop a critical awareness of editions and editorial practice in music from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century. To introduce students to a range of musicological topics and methods, embracing historical, critical and analytical musicology.
(A) MU1036 (B) MU1037 Introduction to Music Analysis (Junior Freshman)
Module coordinator: Michael Taylor

Duration: Michaelmas & Hilary Terms

Contact hours p/w: One one-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: (A) four assessments (25% each); (B) two assessments (50% each)

Weighting: (A) 10 (B) 5 ECTS

Prerequisite: music theory

Objectives: To equip participants with basic analytical skills derived from active listening; students should be able to perceive audible processes in short, simple pieces, and discuss their findings in a clear, jargon-free style.
MU2036 Methodologies of Music Analysis (Senior Freshmen)
Module coordinator: Michael Taylor

Duration: Michaelmas & Hilary Terms

Contact hours: One one-hour seminar once a week

Assessment: A series of tests on each the areas detailed below in "Objectives."

Weighting: 5 ECTS

Prerequisite: Introduction to Music Analysis

Objectives: To refine and broaden analytical skills of tonal music by introducing students to the following

analytical methods and theories: Schenker: basic concepts and definitions; post-tonal theory, basic concepts and definitions, pitch-class sets; readings in harmonic, Schenkerian, and post-Schenkerian analysis; new formal approaches to analysis and rhythmic analysis; psychological approaches to analysis and the influence of literary theory.
(A) MU2042 (B) MU2043 Introduction to Free Composition A/B (Senior Freshmen)
Module coordinators: Dr Evangelia Rigaki

Duration: Michaelmas & Hilary Terms

Contact hours p/w: One one-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: (A) three assessments (33%, 33% & 34%); (B) two assessments (50% & 50%)

Weighting: (A) 10 (B) 5 ECTS

Prerequisite: Harmony I, Counterpoint I

Objectives: To engage in free composition at a preliminary level and in a range of styles. To draw on a range of compositional techniques based on 20th- and 21st-century models, and use those techniques to create original approaches to expression in music. To apply critical thought so as to devise pieces in which the means are appropriate to the intended outcome.
(A) MU3407 (B) MU3447 (C) MU3448 Musicology Seminar (Junior and Senior Sophisters)
Module coordinator: Martin Adams

Duration: Michaelmas & Hilary Terms

Contact hours p/w: One two-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: Essays and afssessment assignments as indicated in the descriptors for each component below

Weighting: (A) 20 (B) 10 (C) 5 ECTS

20 & 10 ECTS will consist of options totaling 24 weeks. 5 ECTS will consist of options totalling 12 weeks.)

Prerequisite: Introduction to Musicology

Objectives: The module will consist of a number of six-week and twelve-week components exploring various topics within historical and analytical musicology. Visiting students should discuss their choices with the module coordinator.
MUS135 Dylan (sophisters)
Module coordinator: Jonathan Hodgers

Duration: Hilary Term

Contact hours p/w: One two-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: 2500-word essay

Weighting: 5 ECTS

Prerequisite: none

Objectives: A look at Bob Dylan’s contribution to popular music, tracing his development as a performer and songwriter to the present day. Among the themes addressed will be the significance of Dylan as a cultural figure, the viability of song lyrics as poetry, and the part played by the artist in pioneering new popular music genres.
MUS136 The Hollywood Film Musical (sophisters)
Module coordinator: Simon Trezise

Duration: Hilary Term

Contact hours p/w: One two-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: 2 journals (40%), project of 2500 words (60%)

Weighting: 5 ECTS

Prerequiste: students must be able to recall a tune, recognise common instruments, and be used to listening to music

Objectives: This is a study of the Hollywood film musical from its earliest days at the birth of the talkies to West Side Story (1961). The module will examine: the relationship of the film musical to the stage musical in terms of structure and practice; the development of the musical in relation to film-making technologies; different genres; accommodation of song and dance in the narrative; musical structures; and the position of the musical in the film industry.
MUS137 Introduction to Japanese Music (sophisters)
Module coordinator: Keith Hennigan

Duration: Hilary Term

Contact hours p/w: One two-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: listening test (20%), essay of 2500 words (80%)

Weighting: 5 ECTS

Prerequisite: none

Objectives: The term ‘Japanese music’ covers a wide range of genres and practices, from the early shomyo and gagaku traditions, through performance genres such as kabuki, to the modern influence of Western music. This module will give an overview of traditional Japanese genres and their history, also examining the repertoire for instruments such as the biwa and shakuhachi.
MUS138 National politics and composers in the first half of the twentieth century (sophisters)

Module coordinator: Kevin Barry

Duration: Hilary Term

Contact hours p/w: One two-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: in-class tests and an essay

Weighting: 5 ECTS

Prerequisite: none

Objectives: A module studying the effects of nationalism and national politics on composers and their music, with a particular focus on Jewish German composers, and Soviet composers (in and out of the USSR).
MUS139 Neo-Riemannian analysis (sophisters)
Module coordinator: Kevin Barry

Duration: Michaelmas Term

Contact hours p/w: One two-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: in-class tests and an essay

Weighting: 5 ECTS

Prerequisite: Introduction to Music Analysis

Objectives: A module analysing the music of the late Romantics (up to Mahler), using techniques that have arisen or been revived in the last thirty years (since Lewin’s GMIT). The module will include study of some nineteenth-century theorists like Riemann, and consider how the changes in tonality (Tristan, etc.) might be reviewed in light of these techniques.
MUS140 Philosophy, development, and diversification of punk rock as a modern musical subculture (sophisters)
Module coordinator: Cormac Bennett

Duration: Michaelmas Term

Contact hours p/w: One two-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: 2500-word essay

Weighting: 5 ECTS

Prerequisite: none

Objectives: The module will examine distinctive characteristics of punk rock from the genre’s inception in the mid-seventies, up to the present day. Classes will explore a range of tenets central to the punk aesthetic, such as political ideals, identification issues, and genre progressions, as well as investigating adaptations by and interactions with more mainstream musical cultures and media
MUS141 Popular Music Studies: Hip-hop and Alternative Rock (sophisters)
Module coordinators: Keither Hennigan, Jenn Kirby

Duration: Michaelmas Term

Contact hours p/w: One two-hour lecture once a week

Assessment: two 1500-word essays

Weighting: 5 ECTS

Prerequisite: none

Objectives: This module consists of two five-week sections, covering arguably the two largest movements in popular music from the end of the twentieth century. ‘Alternative’ was a term that arose in the eighties from the independent music scene, and entered the mainstream during the nineties. The origins, development, and aesthetics of the genre will be discussed, with reference to artists from both the US and UK. Hip-hop, born in the Bronx, spawned an economic, political, social, and cultural movement. This module looks at the global impact of this movement, with a focus on influential artists and albums.


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