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Agendas for the Week: February 19, 2013– February 22, 2013





Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday




Objective(s): SWBAT

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*

*

NGSSS:

Objective(s): SWBAT

*

*

*

NGSSS:

SC.912.L.15.1 Explain how the scientific theory of evolution is supported by the fossil record, comparative anatomy, comparative embryology, biogeography, molecular biology, and observed evolutionary change



Objective(s): SWBAT

*

*Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of evolution and its processes by answering some higher order and some recall level questions
*Students will be to demonstrate their critical thinking skills while answering higher order questions
NGSSS:

SC.912.L.15.1 Explain how the scientific theory of evolution is supported by the fossil record, comparative anatomy, comparative embryology, biogeography, molecular biology, and observed evolutionary change



Objective(s): SWBAT

*

* Students will be able to identify basic trends in hominid evolution from early ancestors.
*

NGSSS:
SC.912.L.15.10

Identify basic trends in hominid evolution from early ancestors six million years ago to modern humans, including brain size, jaw size, language, and

manufacture of tools.


Objective(s): SWBAT

*

*

*

NGSSS:
SC.912.L.15.10

Identify basic trends in hominid evolution from early ancestors six million years ago to modern humans, including brain size, jaw size, language, and

manufacture of tools.


P


Engage


Engage

Related example test question pertaining to evolution.




Engage


Engage
Introduce hominids by showing Lateoli footprint video: http://www.teachersdomain.org/resource/tdc02.sci.life.evo.laetolifoot/

Have students read the background essay.

Engage students in discussion questions.
Model activity have students repeat instructions back to you, and have students tape a copy of the instructions of how to use the website in their notebooks.




Engage
Students will probably be finishing the last activity from Thursday.
Have students watch the finding Lucy video:

http://www.teachersdomain.org/resource/tdc02.sci.life.evo.findinglucy/
Have students read background essay. (2-3 minutes)

http://www.teachersdomain.org/resource/tdc02.sci.life.evo.findinglucy/

Have students answer these questions while and after the video:



What evidence did Johanson use to show that Lucy walked upright?

Why might bipedalism have been an advantage in early hominids?

What changes in the environment might have exerted selective pressure?

Why might larger brains have evolved after bipedalism?
OR/AND
Discussion Questions

One of the oldest debates in the study of human evolution centered around the question of which came first: big brains, or walking upright? Discuss how the discovery of "Lucy" provided evidence for one side of this debate.


Discuss the skills necessary to excavate and assemble bones and bone fragments into complete skeletons. What sort of practice do you imagine would be useful in acquiring these skills?


L


Explore

Explain

Elaborate



Explore

Review student graphic organizers.


Go over all the material from the last two weeks to prepare students for test next day.
Have probing questions in between review.

Explain

Elaborate



Explore

Students have the whole period to take the test.


Explain

Elaborate




Explore
“Divide the class into teams of two, and distribute copies of the Laetoli Trackways Diagram diagram and accompanying backgrounder to each team. Ask each team to study and discuss the trackways and record their answers to the following questions:

What creatures probably made the tracks?

How were these creatures moving (walking, running, etc.)?

What interactions, if any, do the tracks suggest?

What is the evidence for your answers?”
Join back together as class and discuss:

Discussion Questions

 Describe the unusual series of circumstances that caused the Laetoli footprints to be preserved. Does this combination of events say anything about why such footprints are rare finds?

 Discuss why these footprints are so important to paleoanthropologists.

 The existence of an arch in the foot is described as an important advantage for a primate that always walks erect on two legs. Discuss and explain this line of reasoning.



Then have students write down what they think footprints can tell us:

Engage students in a discussion about what footprints can tell us. For example:

Do individuals with longer feet also have longer legs?

Are people with longer legs taller?

Are the number of strides a person takes in a given distance different when he or she is running or walking?

Does the person's stride length change with speed? Would the same hold true for early hominids?

Can patterns of the present give us clues to patterns of the past?



THIS ACTIVITY MAY BE PUSHED TO FRIDAY.

(I may only model how to do it on Thursday and how to answer the questions and have students do exit slips on how to do it)
As a class go through this bio interactive.

Ask students probing questions in between.



http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/evolution/Skeletons/07.html
Have students use laptops to do this interactive and answer questions.
“There are four dig sites in the Riddle of the Bones activity: Lucy, Hadar Skull, First Family, and Laetoli Footprints. Assign each student to a dig site. (It's OK that there will be more than one student per dig site.)
Tell each team to review the evidence at their site and answer the following questions:
What kind of creature made this fossil?

When did this animal live?

What did it look like alive?

How did it move?

When was it found and by whom?
Have the teams write a summary of their findings, then discuss with the class how the fossils are related to one another.
Discuss as a class the following questions:
What kinds of information about hominid evolution does the fossil evidence provide?

What are the limitations of fossil evidence?

What inferences about early hominids are made from the fossils?”
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/humans/riddle/
“Discuss and explore the ways in which paleontologists reconstruct the habits of extinct organisms from looking at particular parts of their fossilized remains, using the "How did they move" section of this feature. What characteristics of the highlighted bones would be useful in determining posture? Range of motion? Dependence on arms in walking?

Discuss the ways which other features of fossils can be used in generating hypothetical reconstructions of how extinct animals looked.

Determining which species a series of bones belong to is no simple matter. Research and discuss the diagnostic features used most heavily by paleoanthropologists to assign hominid fossils to particular species.”


Explain

Elaborate



Explore

Have students use laptops to open up this article and read it:



http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/library/07/1/text_pop/l_071_04.html
And answer the following questions:

What hypotheses do scientists give for the evolution of bipedalism?


What anatomical changes were necessary for bipedalism to evolve?
What cultural changes did bipedalism cause?
How do recent fossil findings support the idea that bipedalism evolved long before large brains?

Explain

Then have students watch Walking Tall:



http://www.teachersdomain.org/resource/tdc02.sci.life.evo.walktall/
And answer the following questions:

What modifications in the human skeleton allow us to walk upright?

List the similarities and differences between human and chimpanzee skeletons.

What problems do humans experience as a result of their upright stance?

What advantages does it convey?

Why can't the chimpanzee walk on two legs?


Elaborate
If there is time, finish the last of the activities on this page, although these activities should take 3 periods, so if anything it will be moved to next Monday.

http://www.teachersdomain.org/resource/tdc02.sci.life.evo.lp_humanevo/


A

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Evaluate and Summary



Evaluate and Summary



Evaluate and Summary



Evaluate and Summary



Evaluate and Summary


Resources:

















http://www.teachersdomain.org/resource/tdc02.sci.life.evo.laetolifoot/


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