Middle Level English Language Arts (ela) Grade 9 a model Thematic Unit Exploring Loyalty, Love, and Relationships



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What Have You Learned?
Self-Assessment


    • Why do people need each other?

    • What does it mean to be a loyal and true friend?

    • What does it mean to belong and be loyal to our family?

    • What does it mean to be in love?

  • How well did you complete your assignments?

  • What were your strengths? What do you need to work on in the next unit?

  • Did you work collaboratively with others?

  • What have you learned about the English language?


Peer Assessment
Did my partner(s) and group member(s):

    • participate effectively in group activities

    • listen respectfully to others

    • help and build on ideas of others

    • stay on task

    • respond appropriately to others

    • encourage others through nonverbal and verbal cues

    • work collaboratively and co-operatively?



Note students’ willingness to participate, to share knowledge and insights, and to reflect. Throughout this unit, students will be asked to take a stand and to support their stand with reasons.
Students will need to return to the focus questions throughout the unit. They may wish to begin a reflection page for each question and to make an initial statement of what they are thinking at the beginning of the unit. These initial reflections can be compared to their insights throughout the rest of the unit.
An interest survey could be used to determine what students like listening to, reading, and viewing in their spare time. Categories can be created for Non-fiction (e.g., autobiographies, biographies, science, how to, politics, history, geography, health, humour, newspapers, magazines); Fiction (e.g., mystery, adventure, sports, animal, romance, fantasy, realistic fiction, story collections); Poetry; Scripts (stage and movie); and Other (e.g., cartoons and comics). If students choose the collections, an “Independent Reading Tracking Sheet” (Identities 9, Teacher’s Guide) could be used.
A checklist or anecdotal record could be used throughout the unit to assess the students’ listening behaviours and strategies and their participation and strategies during discussion activities. The “Listening: Observation Checklist” and “Listening: Student Self-Assessment” (SightLines 9, Teacher’s Guide) could be used as models.

Consider using admit and exit slips during this section of the unit (particularly for the mini-lesson concepts).

The number of readings of this short story gives the teacher a chance to check the students’ reading strategies. What strategies do students use when reading fiction? Do they use thinking strategies at the literal, interpretive, and critical/creative levels?

This is an opportunity to note students’ viewing strategies and to reinforce the support of any inferences and conclusions drawn from the photo. Consider the “Viewing Checklist” (Identities 9, Teacher’s Guide).

Note students’ strategies before/during/after. With the students, prepare a rubric for self- and teacher evaluation of the poster. Use “Representing: Self- or Peer Evaluation” and “Representing: Holistic Assessment Scale”, SightLines 9, Teacher’s Guide as a model.

Have students sketch or make jot notes as they listen.

After the second reading, ask students to identify the point of the poem and to support their conclusion with reasons that draw on the text of the poem. Have students use their charts to explain why the title is ironic.

To reinforce the concept of

irony, select a four-panel comic strip and white-out the captions. Have the students rewrite the captions including irony in one or more of the frames.

Have each student submit his/her opinion and rationale to support it.



Create, with students, a writing rubric for their poem. Use “Writing Rubric” (Crossroads 9, Teacher’s Guide, p. 306), “Writing Poetry: Observation Checklist” (SightLines 9), or “Poetry Checklist” (Identities 9) as models.
Use “Representing: Self- or Peer Evaluation” and “Representing: Holistic Assessment Scale”, SightLines 9, Teacher’s Guide as a model to evaluate T-shirt message.

Use “Reading a Short Story: Observation Checklist”, “Strategies: Student Self-Assessment”, and “Journal Response: Evaluation” (SightLines 9, Teacher’s Guide) to evaluate students’ reading of this story.


Use “Reading a Short Story: Observation Checklist”, “Strategies: Student Self-Assessment”, and “Journal Response: Evaluation” (SightLines 9, Teacher’s Guide) to evaluate students’ reading of this story.

Check students’ understanding of the syntactical cueing system. For example: What is the meaning of the italicized nonsense words in the following contexts:

Jan glondered quickly.

Jan glabered the troper.

Jan was globered.

Check students’ ability to identify the qualifiers.

Check students’ ability to use the appropriate qualifiers for the context.

Check students’ ability to manipulate qualifiers for effect and clarity.

Students will need to return to their initial reflections on the first two focus questions. What are their thoughts after having explored these questions? Have students add their insights at this point in the unit to their initial reflections.
Create with students a rubric for evaluating their final products for this section. The writing and poetry rubrics already developed could be used. “Writing Business Letters” (SightLines 9, Teacher’s Guide) could be used to create the rubric for the letter.

Have students note their initial reflection to the third focus question. Remind them to add to it as they work through this section.

Encourage students to think

carefully about the meaning of the word “family”. Invite them to create an “inclusive” definition that uses inclusive language.
Review expectations for the supporting statement – at least one reason that students can use to support their opinion.
Reinforce the use of complete statements (sentences), strong verbs, clear and appropriate qualifiers.

Consider “Reading a Poem: Observation Checklist” (SightLines 9, Teacher’s Guide) or a variation of this to assess and evaluate students’ reading and interpretation.

Note the care students take with their notemaking.

Use a simple observation checklist to note each student’s ability to work with another (e.g., listens attentively, contributes actively, supports partner).
Create checklist similar to “Role Play: Observation Checklist” #31 (SightLines 9, Teacher’s Guide).

Use rubric created earlier with students to evaluate poem, or use “Writing Rubric” (Crossroads 9, Teacher’s Guide, p. 306); “Writing Poetry: Observation Checklist” (SightLines 9, Teacher’s Guide); or “Poetry Checklist” (Identities 9).

Note students’ viewing and representing strengths.

Create with students a simple rubric to evaluate their products (e.g., content, drawing, dialogue, effectiveness).

Evaluate the clarity and correctness of each sentence.

Evaluate the written product for correction of the “and” and “but” overuse.

Look carefully at finished products done in reflection activities for this section.

Evaluate group work considering: focusing on task, following directions or appropriate process, showing respect for each other, and using examples to explain each main point.

Establish criteria for essay evaluation with students. Consider the following:


  • Criterion 1: Message and Quality

  • Criterion 2: Organization and Coherence

  • Criterion 3: Language Choices (e.g., Tone)

  • Criterion 4: Conventions


Have students note their initial reflection to the fourth focus question. Remind students to add to it as they work through this section.


Review expectations for the supporting statement – at least one reason to support the opinion.

Check inference making and support of inferences with evidence from the text.



Use a simple observation checklist to note each student’s ability to work with another (e.g., listens attentively, contributes actively, supports partner).
Use checklist similar to “Role Play: Observation Checklist“#31 (SightLines 9, Teacher’s Guide).
Encourage support of all conclusions with direct evidence from survey.

Establish a comparison chart for the two texts that includes:

Subject, Main Idea/Theme, Speaker’s Views, Images, Overall Effectiveness of Poem. Note the role of supporting thinking with evidence from the texts.
This is perhaps a good time to use a checklist such as “Reading a Short Story: Observation Checklist” (SightLines 9, Teacher’s Guide). Have students prepare a comparison chart for the three texts using headings such as Subject, Theme,

Main Characters, Conflicts, Overall Effectiveness.

Evaluate for clarity, variety, and effectiveness.


Establish criteria for the paragraph similar to that used with the essay (i.e.,

Criterion 1: Message and Quality

Criterion 2: Organization and Coherence

Criterion 3: Language Choices (e.g., Tone)

Criterion 4: Conventions).

The log can be used as a running check of students’ understanding of the play.




Use a simple observation checklist to note each student’s abilities to work with each other (e.g., listen attentively, contribute actively, support each other).

Create checklist similar to “Role Play: Observation Checklist” #31 (SightLines 9, Teacher’s Guide).


Create and share with students a broad rubric to assess and evaluate their receptive (listening, reading, and viewing) skills and strategies and their expressive (speaking, writing, and representing) skills and strategies for this part of the unit.
Have students begin a log of their new and interesting “Shakespearean” words.

Students should be able to demonstrate a good understanding of the main idea, express an interpretation supported with textual information, express opinions with justification, and consider and respect opinions offered by others.

Possible representing and group work evaluation.

Possible speaking evaluation.

Possible viewing evaluation.

Comprehension and response to Act I check.
Begin a grid such as that illustrated in Appendix B for students to map their consolidating activity for each act.

Possible listening strategy check.

Possible oral language check.
Possible viewing strategy check.

Possible comprehension and response to Act II check.

Have students use the Consolidating Learning Log found in Appendix B to map their consolidating activity for each act.

Possible oral language check.

Possible Act III comprehension and response check.

Have students use the Consolidating Learning Log found in Appendix B to map their consolidating activity for each act.

Possible Act IV comprehension and response check.

Have students use their grid to map their consolidating activity for the act.

Possible Act V comprehension and response check.

Have students use their grid to map their consolidating activity for the act.






Appendix A


Appendix A




Reading Log for Unit


Title

Author

Date

Number of Pages

Comments

Rating

Started

Finished







































































































Appendix B
Appendix B

Consolidating Learning

Romeo and Juliet


Act

Consolidating Activity

Criteria Used

Mark

Act I

Comments:










Act II

Comments:










Act III

Comments:










Act IV

Comments:










Act V

Comments:










Concluding Activity









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