Making Writing Real! Aims



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          • Making
          • Writing
          • Real!

Aims

  • To reinforce the range of text-forms;
  • To consider the variety of writing outcomes within each text-form;
  • To maximise the opportunities for writing in Literacy and across the curriculum.
  • The Sequence from Reading to Writing
  • Shared Reading
  • Immersion and analysis
  • Gathering Content
  • Shared Writing
  • Planning, composing, editing and revising
  • Guided Writing
  • Pre-writing, writing, post writing
  • Independent Writing
  • Investigating, practising and applying skills
  • Outcome
  • Bringing
  • to presentation

Planning Circles

  • Shared reading:
  • decoding
  • understanding
  • text analysis
  • Planning, shared writing,
  • independent and guided writing:
  • creative outcomes

Literacy Outcomes

  • F ormat
  • L anguage
  • A udience
  • P urpose

Format

  • What format should it take? Book, leaflet, essay, video, headings, sub-headings, diagrams, bullets, fact-files, photos;
  • Unit outcomes should look different as the children move through the school;
  • Looking at inspirational examples;
  • More sophisticated structures should begin to appear.
  • Does the format enhance the text?

Language

  • The language should be appropriate for the text -type – formal, informal;
  • The vocabulary becomes increasingly precise or technical;
  • Connectives reflect the text-type;
  • Sentence structure is varied and manipulated for effect;
  • Children are taught to ‘say the sentence’ from the earliest age
  • If you can’t say it, you can’t write it!
  • What sort of words will we need for this?
  • What sort of sentences will we need?
  • Is the language appropriate for the purpose and audience?

Purpose

  • What is the purpose of this text? To inform, persuade, argue, discuss, entertain, stimulate, instruct, challenge.
  • Does the text reflect its purpose?

Audience

  • Who is it for?
  • How can they be engaged/attracted to the text?
  • How is the text adapted for the audience?
  • Does the text suit the audience?

Text Forms. . . . How to write

  • Recount including Diaries, Biography, Autobiography and Journalistic writing
  • Instructions
  • Non-chronological report
  • Explanation
  • Discussion
  • Persuasion
  • See text-form leaflets.
  • Narrative
  • Poetry
  • Playscript

Activity

  • Look at the handout with the six non-fiction text-forms.
  • In pairs, list as many possible text-types beneath each one.

Possible Text Types

  • Recount:
    • letter
    • autobiography
    • diary or journal
    • newspaper report
    • magazine article
    • science experiment
    • Discussion
    • newspaper editorial
    • non-fiction book on an ‘issue’
    • write up of a debate
    • formal essay
    • leaflet or article giving balanced account of an issue
  • Report
  • information leaflet
  • tourist guide
  • encyclopaedia entry
  • magazine article
  • non-fiction book
  • letter
    • Explanation
    • encyclopaedia entry
    • non-fiction book
    • technical manual
    • question and answer articles and leaflets
    • write-up of science experiment
    • Multi-modal
  • Instructions
    • recipe
    • technical manual
    • non-fiction book
    • timetable, route-finder
    • list of rules
    • posters, notices, signs
    • sewing or knitting pattern
    • instructions on packaging
    • Persuasion
    • advertisement
    • catalogue
    • travel brochure
    • pamphlet from pressure group
    • newspaper/magazine article
    • poster or flier
    • book blurb
    • letter to editor or editorial
  • Text-form checklist
  • Text-Type
  • Structure
  • Language Features
  • Writer’s Knowledge

Planning Skeletons

  • The planning skeletons have been developed by Sue Palmer.
  • They are a visual representation of the structures of each text type
  • Link knowledge and understanding with the literacy skills required to record that understanding
  • They are particularly
  • useful for visual learners

Gathering Content . . . . What to write

  • Brainstorming
  • Concept mapping
  • KWL grid
  • QUADS grid
  • Role play
  • Flow diagrams
  • Mind-mapping
  • Sound
  • Think, say, feel
  • Visits
  • Visitors
  • Retelling
  • Still and moving image
  • Drama techniques
  • Drawing and labelling
  • Time-lines
  • Skimming, scanning, key words
  • Blitzed Site 1942 L.S. Lowry

KWL Grids

  • K – What do I Know?
  • W – What do I Want to know?
  • L – What have I Learnt?

Think, say, feel

Short writing opportunities

  • Post it notes
  • Story map
  • Notes
  • Diary
  • Letter
  • Poem
  • Email or text messages
  • Problem page
  • For and against
  • Fact boxes
  • Summarising
  • Character profiles
  • Thought bubbles and speech bubbles
  • Short play script/conversation/ dialogue/gossip
  • Story map

Activity

  • Choose one of the following options. In pairs use the picture to write:
  • A letter – to problem page; family; colleague; council housing department;
  • A diary entry;
  • A newspaper report;
  • A poem.

Possible Newspaper Headline: Boy’s chemistry homework goes up in smoke!

  • Possible poem
  • There was a small boy from Fleetwood
  • Who never would do what he should
  • He’d turned on the gas
  • But had forgotten the match
  • So the house fell down where he stood!
  • Anon (not surprisingly!)

Home time!



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