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Sociology

General Information

Contact Information

Department of

Location:

Mailing Address:

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xxxx xxx xxxx

xxxx xxx xxxxx

Courier Address:

xxxxx xxxx xxx

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xxxx xxx xxxxx

Telephone Number: 250-xxx-xxxx

Fax Number: 250-xxx-xxxx

E-mail: < >

Website: < >

Chair: Chair’s name

E-mail: < >

Phone: 250-xxx-xxxx

Graduate Advisor: Graduate Advisor’s name

E-mail: < >

Phone: 250-xxx-xxxx

Graduate Secretary: Graduate Secretary’s name

E-mail: < >

Phone: 250-xxx-xxxx

Faculty Members and Areas of Research



Douglas Baer, PhD (Waterloo)

Social inequality; political sociology; quantitative methods; voluntary associations

P. Morgan Baker, PhD (Minnesota)

Social psychology; theory; group dynamics, social gerontology

Cecilia M. Benoit, PhD (Toronto)

Heath and illness; work; occupations and professions; gender; youth; marginalization; social policy

William K. Carroll, PhD (York)

Political economy; social movements; Marxism and post-Marxism, social theory

Neena L. Chappell, PhD (McMaster)

Aging, health and social policy

Aaron H. Devor, PhD (Washington)

Sex, gender and sexuality

C. David Gartrell, PhD (Harvard)

Networks; social psychology; theory; methods and statistics; religion

Helga K. Hallgrimsdottir, PhD (Western Ontario)

Social movements; historical sociology

R. Alan Hedley, PhD (Oregon)

Social change and development; sociology of work and technology; comparative cultures; research methodology

Sean P. Hier, PhD (McMaster)

Race and racism; surveillance; moral regulation and moral panic; intellectual inclusion; media; social theory; risk sociology

Karen M. Kobayashi, PhD (Simon Fraser)

Aging; family; health

Martha McMahon, PhD (McMaster)

Symbolic interaction; feminism; environment and ecological feminism; local food; motherhood

Richard L. Ogmundson, PhD (Michigan)

Stratification; political sociology; elites

Margaret J. Penning, PhD (Alberta)

Aging; health and health care; research methods

Alison Thomas, PhD (Reading)

Gender relations; gender and identity; critical/feminist perspectives on "family"; discourse analysis

Zheng Wu, PhD (Western Ontario)

Demography; family; aging; health

Emeritus Faculty



T. Rennie Warburton, PhD (London School of Economics)

Religion; class relations and ideology; racism and ethnicity

Adjunct Faculty



Francis Adu-Febiri, PhD (UBC)

Racialization and ethnicity; workplace diversity; tourism

B. Singh Bolaria, PhD (Washington State)

Social inequality; labour migrations; immigration policy; health and illness

Thomas K. Burch, PhD (Princeton)

Demography; family; theory

Robert A. Hackett, PhD (Queen’s)

Mass media

James C. Hackler, PhD (Washington)

Deviance; social control; criminology and delinquency

Ken Hatt, PhD (Alberta)

Crime and delinquency; ethnic and aboriginal relations; formal organizations; development and ecological sociology

Mikael Jansson, PhD (Western Ontario)

Demography; marginalization; youth; personal service work

William McCarthy, PhD (Toronto)

Deviant Behaviour; research methods; youth;

Rhonda J.V. Montgomery, PhD (Minnesota)

Aging and adult development; Family Relations; Health Care Delivery

Robert S. Ratner, PhD (Yale)

Criminology/delinquency; collective behavior/social movements; small groups

Dorothy E. Smith, PhD (UC, Berkeley)

Social organization of knowledge; political economy of gender

Graduate Programs in Sociology

The program leading to the Master of Arts degree in Sociology, while containing a core of theory and method, is designed to provide flexibility for students as well as to reflect the diversity which characterizes the discipline. Individual programs beyond the core are designed to fit students’ interests and to supplement areas in which they may require additional work, insofar as faculty resources and specializations permit.

Normally, work as a research assistant or teaching assistant is an integral part of the master’s program in Sociology.

Students are urged to consult the most recent edition of A Guide to Graduate Studies in Sociology, which may be obtained at the Departmental Office. The Guide provides further details of the program and specifies additional requirements for program completion.



Admission Requirements

Preference will be given to students with a B+ (6.00) average or better. All incoming graduate students must fulfil the requirements expected of undergraduate Honours students in this ­Department.



Program Requirements

Master’s Program

The Department offers two programs leading to the MA degree. Normally, students will declare their intentions of pursuing one or the other option by the end of April of their first year in the graduate program.

A. Thesis Option

This program involves 9 units of course work and a 6-unit thesis, with at least 12 of the 15 units drawn from Sociology listings in the Calendar. At least 13.5 units must be at the graduate level; 1.5 units may be selected from undergraduate Sociology courses numbered 300 and higher (subject to approval by the Graduate Adviser). In this program, students write a thesis (SOCI 599) for which they will receive 6 units of credit. Students are required to demonstrate competence in both sociological theory (SOCI 500) and sociological research design (SOCI 511); they must demonstrate competence in either quantitative or qualitative methods by completing either SOCI 510 or 515.

In addition, normally students must complete at least one of the following: SOCI 545, 555, 565, 575, 585 or CSPT 500 (if taught by a member of the Sociology Department). These courses are designed to facilitate the range of interests displayed by traditional and contemporary sociological inquiry. The range of such interests is illustrated by the current areas of interest declared by the Sociology faculty.

B. Non-thesis Option

This program involves 13.5 units of course work and a 3-unit Extended Essay, with at least 12 of the 16.5 units drawn from Sociology listings in the Calendar. At least 15 units must be at the graduate level; 1.5 units may be selected from undergraduate Sociology courses numbered 300 and higher (subject to approval by the Graduate Adviser). In this program, students write an Extended Essay (SOCI 598) for which they receive 3 units of credit. Students are required to demonstrate competence in both sociological theory (SOCI 500) and sociological research design (SOCI 511); they must demonstrate competence in quantitative and/or qualitative methods (SOCI 510 and/or 515). In addition, students must complete at least two of the following: SOCI 545, 555, 565, 575, 585 or CSPT 500 (if taught by a member of the Sociology department).

Additional courses may be taken from other departments, up to a maximum of 4.5 units, selected in consultation with the Graduate Adviser and the student’s supervisor, and with permission of the other departments.

Students in the non-thesis program will be supervised by a committee consisting of their academic supervisor and one other Department member and will undergo an oral examination upon completion of their Extended Essay.

Length of Program

The Department expects full-time students to spend two years completing the master’s degree.

Concentration in Cultural, Social and Political Thought (CSPT)

This program is open to selected students in Sociology, English, History and Political Science. Students must meet the core graduating requirements of the individual departments.

The Graduate Adviser in each department should be consulted for details. To complete the CSPT program in Sociology a student must complete the 15 units of requirements for an MA in Sociology (including a thesis for SOCI 599 in the field of CSPT), plus at least 3 units of CSPT 500. See the course listings for descriptions of CSPT 500 and CSPT 590.

Admission to the program in CSPT is subject to the written approval of the Program Director. Applicants must already have been accepted for the MA program in Sociology.

The requirements for the program in the Departments of English, History and Political Science differ from those in Sociology.

Co-operative Education

The Co-operative Education option within the MA program provides for some Sociology students to obtain relevant work experience while completing their degree requirements. Students who successfully complete (what will normally be) two work terms and satisfy the academic requirements of the MA program offered by the Department of Sociology will receive a notation to this effect on their transcripts at graduation. Prior work experience is not accepted for work term credit.



Applications for admission to the Co-operative Program should be submitted not later than the second week of the student’s first term in the MA program. Normally work term placements will not be considered for those students who have not successfully completed SOCI 500 and 511 by the time their work term placement is expected to begin. The Co-operative Education option is only available to full-time students; part-time students may apply for admission on the understanding that they will be required to change to full-time status for the remainder of their program.


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