Literary Terms, Booklet, page literary terms



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Literary Terms, Booklet, page

LITERARY TERMS Dr. Gates

TERMSLIT.DOC EH 102


You are responsible for all poetic terms and dramatic terms for the Midterm. Fiction terms will be covered as we do the short stories and will be tested on the final. Topics for Paper 2 will be taken from this list. The important goal is to be able USE the terms, demonstrate their effect in examples from outside sources and created from your own imagination. A substantial component of Papers 1 and 3 and the ESSAY for the Midterm will expect you to show you can use these terms. There will be a retest of these terms as a component of the FINAL EXAM, both in short answers, and in using them to analyze literature in your essays.
POETIC TERMS
alliteration

allusion


analogy (not in anthology, see directions for Paper 4)

apostrophe

assonance

aubade (not listed in index, but see page 846-7 by Wilbur and check other sources for more complete definition: a love poem taking place at dawn, when lovers are parting)

ballad

blank verse



carpe diem

connotation

consonance

couplet


denotation

diction (also see informal diction, middle diction, etc.)

elegy

end rhyme



enjambment (and see run-on-line)

end-stopped line

epic

feminine rhyme



figure of speech, figurative language

fixed form poem (and see villanelle, sonnet, limerick; haiku, sestina)

foot

free verse



hyperbole

iambic meter

image, imagery

internal rhyme

irony (also dramatic, situational, tragic, verbal irony)

Italian sonnet

lyric

masculine rhyme



metaphor (also extended metaphor)

meter


metonymy

octave


onomatopoeia

oxymoron


paradox

pentameter (see under meter and know iambic pentameter)

personification

Petrarchan sonnet

pun (you will need homonym)

quatrain
refrain (not in glossary)

rhythm

rhyme


rhyme scheme

run-on-line

sarcasm

scansion


sestina

Shakespearean sonnet

simile

sonnet


stanza

stress


synecdoche

symbol (also conventional symbol, open symbol)

tercet

terza rima

theme


tone
understatement

villanelle


DRAMATIC TERMS

General Terms:

aside


climax

comedy


dénouement

deus ex machina

dialogue


diction

dramatic convention (see conventions)

dramatic irony

exposition

farce

melodrama



playwright (note spelling!)

plot


realistic drama (and relationship to well-made play); see realism

soliloquy


Types of dramatic characters

confidant (not listed in index)

dynamic character (also developing )

flat character (also static)

foil character (also consult PowerPoint slide show)

static character

stock character
Additional Greek tragedy terms (See in 8th ed. 1423-25)

catharsis (purgation)

chorus

exodus


hamartia (trait: weakness, flaw, error, or excess)

hubris (pride)

parodos

prologue


recognition (anagnorsis)

reversal (peripeteia)

stichomythia (not in text: see slide show and Guth and Rico, page 980)

tragedy, especially Aristotle's definition

tragic irony

unities of time place, action in Greek drama (not in index)



TERMS In Study of FICTION


climax

characterization

foreshadowing

motivation, motivated action

narrator

plot


point of view

(first-person; objective,

omniscient, limited omniscient)

see also in index under "editorial omniscience"

suspense

theme


protagonist

stream of consciousness technique



setting

NOTES ON USING TERMS:
Avoid simply identifying terms. Be able to use them to show effective command of figurative language. You will notice that the lists are mainly alphabetical, while the chapters in the book present the terms in a logical order. Use the backcover index in Meyer's Bedford Intro to Literature for locating the textbook discussion of the term. I suggest that you organize your study of the poetic terms by categorizing them as either Sound, Sense, or Pattern. Even though you are mastering the definitions of the terms for short answer quizzing and testing, you should make sure to give appropriate credit to a source or sources for the definitions in your major papers. Remember, even a paraphrase requires a proper citation and signal phrase. Quote exactly when the wording is important. Indirect quotations also require sourcing. If you use on-line sources in defining and showing examples of terms, make sure you follow the criteria announced for documenting the sources in an MLA style bibliography.
Note that I have separated the 3 genres in my list and streamlined the total six-column list. Criticism and schools of critical theory are under-emphasized in courses for non-majors.


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