Liberal Arts Essentials Assessment Plan Course: Voice musc 141/341 Writing Unit: No Instructor(s)



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Liberal Arts Essentials Assessment Plan
Course: Voice - MUSC 141/341

Writing Unit: No

Instructor(s): C. Andrew Blosser, Cassandra McDonald, Robert Owen Jones, Tammy Regensburger, Carol Wilcox-Jones

Methods: Embedded writing assignment in the third semester of study; LAE course evaluation

questions at the end of the third semester of study


LAE Category: Western Heritage c

Goal 2: Muskingum Students will explore connections among formal learning, citizenship, and service to our community

Learning Objective 1: Students will use their knowledge and skills gained through their coursework to address issues and interests within their communities

  1. Student work examined

List the tasks used to measure the objective (e.g., exams, research project/paper assignments, presentation or class assignment) and attach a copy of each along with the Departmental plan.

All ensemble music students present performances while a member of an ensemble and most applied students perform on campus as well. It is hoped that they would participate in community ensembles in their home areas. An embedded assignment will be made during the third semester of study in applied music or an ensemble for music participants. This assignment will be an essay in response to the following question: “Based upon what you have learned so far in your lessons (ensemble), how strongly do you feel the responsibility to share your musical knowledge and talents, advocacy, and support of the arts within your community?”

Along with grading this essay in the traditional sense, a separate assessment of the essay will be conducted using the rubric provided. These courses seek to provide students with not only the technical skills and musical artistry of performance, but also imbue in them the need to share this artistry with the public.

Also to be examined will be the answers to assessment questions on course evaluation forms completed at the end of the third semester. These results will be correlated with the results from the previous question.



  1. Scoring Criteria

Briefly explain the criteria used to evaluate student performance in relation to the learning objective (i.e., what constitutes advanced, proficient, partially proficient, not proficient, etc.) Attach copies of measurement instrument or rubric.

Advanced

Advanced will be defined as students being able to provide well conceived reasoning and excellent exhortations as to each of the objectives in the rubric

An average of 4.0 or better on the assessment questions

Proficient

Proficient will be defined as students being able to provide adequate reasoning and exhortations as to each of the objectives in the rubric

An average of 3.0 – 3.9 on the Assessment questions

Partially Proficient

Partially proficient will be defined as students being able to provide some reasoning and/or some exhortations as to most of the objectives in the rubric

An average of 2.0-2.9 on the Assessment questions

Not Proficient

Not proficient will be defined as the student not being able to provide reasoning or exhortations to any of the objectives in the rubric



An average below 1.9 on the Assessment questions

  1. Attachments (Rubrics, Checklists, Pre and Post tests, other evaluation methods, etc.)

Since passing on our cultural heritage and artistic service to the community is a basic purpose of music education in the schools and institutions of higher learning, music students must “possess a knowledge of the performance practices in their particular solo and ensemble performing areas through repertoire and technical studies and be willing to present those to the public through performance.” (Music Department Assessment Plan-2004; amended 2008)

Essay Examination Rubric

Objective

4

3

2

1

Essay response describes how strongly the student believes in the performing artist’s responsibility to perform for the community

Student poses cogent, well-planned arguments using both denotative and connotative language that the performing artist is responsible to pass on our cultural heritage

Student poses cogent well-planned arguments that the performing artist is responsible to pass on our cultural heritage

Student poses arguments that the performing artist should be responsible to pass on our cultural heritage

Student poses arguments that the performing artist is not responsible to pass on our cultural heritage

Essay response describes how strongly the student believes in correct performance practice in public performance

Student poses cogent, well-planned arguments using both denotative and connotative language that the performing artist is responsible to perform not only using proper performance practice, but adds when and how to successfully alter performance practice to bring in new ways of performing

Student poses cogent, well-planned arguments that the performing artist is responsible to perform using proper performance practice

Student poses arguments that the performing artist should be responsible to perform using proper performance practice

Student poses arguments that the performing artist should not be responsible to perform using proper performance practice

Essay response describes how strongly the student believes in performing outside of collegiate requirements- i.e. community ensembles, church, community events, etc.

Student poses cogent, well-planned arguments using both denotative and connotative language that the performing artist is responsible to participate in performance activities beyond collegiate requirements

Student poses cogent, well-planned arguments that the performing artist should be responsible to participate in performance activities beyond collegiate requirements

Student poses arguments that the performing artist should be responsible to participate in performance activities beyond collegiate requirements

Student poses arguments that the performing artist should not be responsible to participate in performance activities beyond collegiate requirements


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