Length: maximum 2000 words: take-home, edited (please include word count), plus regular consultations with the teacher. Assessment Design Criteria / Performance Standards for Stage 2 English Studies



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Assessment Design Criteria / Performance Standards for Stage 2 English Studies




Knowledge and Understanding

Analysis

Application

Communication

A

Knowledge and understanding of a wide

range of ways in which authors use

stylistic features and language

techniques to communicate complex and

familiar ideas, and to influence the

reader’s response.
Detailed knowledge and understanding of

the ideas, values, and beliefs in familiar

and unfamiliar texts.
Knowledge and understanding of the

ways in which creators and readers of

familiar and unfamiliar texts use a range

of textual conventions to make meaning.


Analysis of complex connections

between personal experiences, ideas,

values, and beliefs, and those explored in

familiar and unfamiliar texts.
In comparative exercises, a perceptive

analysis of connections between texts,

based on analysis and synthesis of

similarities and/or differences.


Perceptive analysis of a range of ways in

which authors use language techniques

to influence opinions and decisions in

familiar and unfamiliar texts.


Use of a wide range of language skills and techniques to create sophisticated and coherent texts that address the meaning and intention of the task.


In comparative exercises, a perceptive

recognition of connections between texts,

through responses that integrate

discussion of texts and move easily between them.


Detailed and appropriate use of evidence

from texts to support responses, with

textual references incorporated fluently in

discussion.


Skills in using the textual, structural, and

conventional features of text types for a

range of familiar and unfamiliar contexts,

audiences, and purposes.


Fluent and precise writing and speaking,

using appropriate style and structure for

a range of mainly unfamiliar audiences

and contexts.
Appropriate use of form and register to

convey mostly complex meaning in a

range of unfamiliar contexts.


B

Knowledge and understanding of the

ways in which authors use stylistic

features and language techniques to

communicate complex and familiar ideas,

and to influence the reader’s response.


Knowledge and understanding of some

ideas, values, and beliefs in familiar, and

some unfamiliar, texts.
Knowledge and understanding of the

ways in which creators and readers of

mainly familiar texts use some textual

conventions to make meaning.


Analysis of some complex connections

between personal experiences, ideas,

values, and beliefs, and those explored in

familiar, and some unfamiliar, texts.
In comparative exercises, a clear

analysis of connections between texts,

based on analysis of similarities and/or

differences.


Analysis of a range of ways in which

authors use language techniques to

influence opinions and decisions in

familiar, and some unfamiliar, texts.


Use of a range of language skills and

techniques to create clear and coherent texts that address the meaning and intention of the task.
In comparative exercises, recognition of

connections between texts, through responses that compare and contrast texts in an integrated way.


Appropriate use of evidence from texts to

support responses, with textual references incorporated in discussion.


Skills in using some of the textual, structural, and conventional features of text types for a range of mainly familiar, and some unfamiliar, contexts, audiences, and purposes.

Mostly fluent and precise writing and

speaking, using appropriate style and

structure for a range of mostly familiar

audiences and contexts.
Appropriate use of form and register to

convey complex and simple meaning in a

range of familiar and unfamiliar contexts.


C

Knowledge and understanding of a

narrow range of ways in which authors

use stylistic features and language

techniques to communicate mainly

familiar ideas, and to influence the

reader’s response.
Knowledge and understanding of some

ideas, values, and beliefs in mainly

familiar texts.
Knowledge and understanding of some

of the ways in which creators and

readers of a range of familiar texts use

textual conventions to make simple or

factual meaning.

Analysis of simple connections between

personal experiences, ideas, values, and

beliefs, and those explored in familiar

texts.
In comparative exercises, analysis of

connections between texts, based on

some understanding of similarities and/or

differences.


Descriptive analysis of a number of ways

in which authors use language

techniques to influence opinions and

decisions in familiar texts.


Use of language skills and techniques to

create texts that address the meaning

and intention of the task.


In comparative exercises, recognition of

some connections between texts,

through responses that compare and

contrast texts, usually in a sequential

rather than an integrated way.
Competent use of evidence from texts to

support responses, with some use of

textual references in discussion.
Skills in using some of the textual,

structural, and conventional features of

some text types for familiar contexts,

audiences, and purposes.


Generally fluent and functional writing

and speaking, using appropriate style

and structure for familiar audiences and

contexts.
Appropriate use of form and register to

convey simple meaning in a narrow

range of familiar and unfamiliar contexts.


D

Knowledge and restricted understanding

of some simple stylistic features and

language techniques used by authors to

communicate mainly familiar ideas, and

to influence the reader’s response.


Knowledge and understanding of some

familiar ideas, values, and beliefs in

familiar texts.
Knowledge and understanding of a

restricted number of ways in which

creators and readers of a narrow range

of familiar texts use some textual

conventions to make simple or factual

meaning.

Reference to simple connections

between uncomplicated personal

experiences, ideas, values, and beliefs,

and those explored in familiar texts.


In comparative exercises, answers that

make partial comparisons and contrasts.


Reference to some ways in which

authors use a range of language

techniques to influence opinions and

decisions in familiar texts.


Use of some language skills and

techniques to create texts that partly address the meaning and intention of the task.
In comparative exercises, some

awareness of connections between texts,

through partial responses that mainly

deal with texts separately.


Some use of evidence from texts to

support a response, with use of a narrow

range of textual references.
Skills in using some of the textual,

structural, or conventional features of a

text type for a familiar context, audience,

or purpose.


Achievement of a level of fluency in

writing and speaking, in a mainly

appropriate style.


Occasionally appropriate use of form

and/or register to convey simple meaning

in familiar contexts.


E

Knowledge and understanding of a

restricted range of simple stylistic

features and language techniques used

by authors to communicate familiar

ideas, and to influence the reader’s

response.
Identification of an idea, a value, or a

belief in familiar texts.


Knowledge and understanding of the

ways in which a creator or reader of a

highly familiar text uses textual

conventions to make factual meaning.


Recognition of a simple connection

between a straightforward personal,

experience, idea, value, or belief, and

that explored in a highly familiar text.
In comparative exercises, answers that

make a simple comparison or contrast.


Reference to the way in which an author

uses language techniques to influence

opinions and decisions in a highly familiar

text.

Attempted use of a restricted range of

language skills and/or techniques to create a text or texts that attempt to address the meaning or intention of the task.


In comparative exercises, identification of

limited connections between texts, through fragmented responses that deal with texts separately.


Restricted use of evidence from texts to

support a simple response, with limited

textual reference.
Skills in using the textual, structural, or

conventional features of a text type for a

highly familiar context, audience, or

purpose.

Emerging development of fluency in an

occasionally appropriate style.


Occasionally appropriate use of form and

register to convey literal meaning in



highly familiar contexts.

Comments:




Year 12 English Studies

Individual Study


General Introduction


  • Your Individual Study involves reading and critically analysing two “texts” independent of those studied as a class.

  • “Texts” may include novels, plays, poetry anthologies, films, graphic novels, short story collections and so on.

  • My recommendation: Be careful of choosing a film as a text to analyse. Many who choose a film as a text analyse it poorly and merely treat it as a narrative (story). Film texts are not easy to critically evaluate and require a great deal of analysis of film technique.

  • If permitted, you may choose a film text as your SECOND text.

  • Another recommendation is to choose two texts of different format, such as novel/play or perhaps play/poetry or novel/film, if only to help you focus on the similarities and differences between them.

  • You may choose texts by authors studied in class.

  • A further recommendation: do not choose your second text until you have finished your first. This should widen your options instead of locking you into a certain frame of thinking.

  • Your FIRST TEXT must be chosen by Term 1 Week 2, in close consultation with your teacher.

  • Texts must be connected in some way – thematically, preferably not by author.

  • The Individual Study is designed to promote your awareness as a reader and should enhance your ability to detect and analyse the textual devices employed by the authors. It is much more than understanding plot, characters and themes.



Timeline


  • Term 1: Read and annotate TEXT 1.

  • Term 2: Read and annotate TEXT 2, making comparisons with TEXT 1.

  • Term 3: Draft your 2000 word Critical Essay, which compares your two texts.

  • End of Term 3 Week 10: First “draft” of Critical Essay due.

  • Term 4: Editing process.

  • Term 4 Week 6: Final Copy of Critical Essay Due (after/during exams).

  • Finally, more details are on the sheet entitled What to take notes on as you read…



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