Leading Arkansas Teachers I am a teacher serving students under your leadership



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Leading Arkansas Teachers

I am a teacher serving students under your leadership.

  • How will you continually
  • invest in building my capacity as an effective teacher?

The Art and Science of Teaching

      • Pedagogy – leading children
      • Andragogy – leading adults

ERZ Concepts

  • Collaboration
  • Community and Parent Involvement
  • Distance Learning
  • Faculty Sharing
  • Mentoring
  • Professional Development
  • Recruitment and Retention
  • Teacher Preparation Programs

Purposes:

  • A look at Leadership
  • A look at Literacy Design Collaborative through the lens of teacher support
    • planning/developing of modules in PLCs
    • during an LDC module
    • after LDC module has been taught

Finis Origine Pendet: The end depends upon the beginning.

  • “How you begin determines what you will achieve.” The Emperor's Club
  • “If your goal is to reach a particular destination, decisions about the route must come after identifying that destination.” 
  • – Thomas R. Guskey
  • ASCD EL May 2014: Professional Learning Reimagined, page 15
  • What is our plan/route for educating students in Arkansas?
  • “If our goal is to reach a particular destination, decisions about the route must come after identifying that destination.”
  • Sphere of Influence in Education
  • Source: Model developed by Stephen Barkley

Sometimes, this is how it feels…

…and sometimes, it feels this way.

Do you and your teachers know what school will look like when the Common Core State Standards are fully implemented? LDC?

  • Do you and your teachers know what school will look like when the Common Core State Standards are fully implemented? LDC?
  • Are you and your teachers clear about what will no longer be happening when the CCSS are fully implemented? LDC?
  • Are you and your teachers critical consumers of materials and resources that claim to be aligned with the CCSS?

Which of the following are the central shifts required from the CCSS in ELA/Literacy? (check all that apply)

  • Build students’ knowledge through content-rich non-fiction.
  • Provide students reading and writing experiences grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational.
  • Strengthen students’ understanding of narrative text by making meaningful connections to their personal experiences.
  • Provide students different levels of text based on their reading abilities.
  • Provide regular opportunities for students to practice with complex grade-level text and its academic language.

Which of the following are central shifts required from the CCSS in math? (check all that apply)

  • Focus deeply on the concepts emphasized in the standards to help students build strong foundations for learning.
  • Create coherent progressions within the standards from grade to grade so student knowledge and skills build onto previous learning.
  • Introduce multiplication and division earlier in students’ learning as foundations for math concepts taught in later years.
  • Develop students’ conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, and their ability to apply math in context.
  • Teach each math topic as an independent, new concept that is distinct from topics taught earlier or later.

Which of the following describes an activity that would meet the CCSS below? (check one)

  • Students summarize a chapter of a novel and apply
  • what they’ve read to their own lives.
  • Students write a story about the American Revolution
  • as if they lived through the time period.
  • After reading a novel, students develop an argument
  • in favor of a character’s point of view based on facts
  • and events from the book.
  • Students interview a local elected official after reading about voting rights in America.

S.N.A.P (Stop Now and Process)

LDC Core Principles

  • Align with the Common Core State Standards.
  • Distribute responsibility for reading and writing.
  • Make tasks central.
  • Connect reading and writing instruction.
  • Call for back-mapping.
  • Foster a responsive system.
  • Encourage local choice.
  • Strive to be teacher-friendly.

Goals of LDC

  • To engage students in reading, comprehending, analyzing, interpreting, and responding to complex texts
  • To align assignments to standards and promote collaboration
  • To help teachers personalize learning so that every student can master the standards
  • To ensure that all students can be college and career ready

To engage students in reading, comprehending, analyzing, interpreting, and responding to complex texts

  • To engage students in reading, comprehending, analyzing, interpreting, and responding to complex texts
  • To align assignments to standards and promote collaboration
  • To help teachers personalize learning so that every student can master the standards
  • To ensure that all students can be college and career ready

Literacy Design Collaborative

  • What Task? (what the students will do)
  • What Skills? (skills students will learn along the way to completing the task and how they will provide evidence of their learning along the way)
  • What Instruction? (what the teacher will do to ensure students learn – how the teacher will teach the skills)
  • What Results? (aligning student products to the rigor of the CCSS – scoring student work according to the expectations of the standards)

LDC Language

  • Module
  • Instructional Ladder
  • Template Task
  • Teaching Task
  • Skills List
  • Demands
  • Argumentative Writing
  • Close Reading
  • Literacy
  • Mini-tasks
  • Rubric
  • Text Complexity

S.N.A.P (Stop Now and Process)

LDC Review and Updates

  • LDC Review and Updates

LDC is a powerful solution to the primary challenges currently facing schools and districts nationwide in:

  • LDC is a powerful solution to the primary challenges currently facing schools and districts nationwide in:
  • implementing the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).
  • demonstrating clear evidence of teacher effectiveness.
  • adopting a structure that naturally leads to teacher continuous improvement.
  • connecting teacher planning and instruction directly to evidence of student work.
  • Why LDC?

Why LDC?, cont.

  • LDC provides collaborative tools and language for teachers, schools, and districts to increase teacher effectiveness, student achievement, and organizational learning while at the same time seamlessly integrating CCSS into daily instruction in science, history, English language arts, and other disciplines.
  • Three Types of Writing:
  • Argumentative
  • Informative/Explanatory
  • Narrative
  • Literacy Design Collaborative
  • LDC Template Task Collection 2.0
  • December 2013
  • A Teacher's Perspective on LDC Tasks

LDC Announces: New LDC Elementary Template Task Beta Collection

  • “A template task collection for three grade bands:
  • K/1, 2/3, and 4/5 [is ready] for beta testing; we are hoping that schools and teachers in classrooms across the country will try out the new template tasks. We greatly value your feedback, so please send your experiences, revisions, and recommendations to questions@ldc.org.”

BREAK

  • #ARLDC
  • What is Required?
  • Fill in the template task, completing all blanks but not
  • altering the other template wording.
  • List the reading texts for the prompt or describe how
  • students will be guided to select appropriate texts.
  • Provide a background statement that introduces the
  • prompt to students.
  • If an extension is included, provide an activity in which
  • students share or apply what they have learned with a
  • real-world audience or through a hands-on project.
  • (The extension may also be omitted.)
  • Use the appropriate rubric for the template task.
  • LDC Template Tasks

Changing or adding to the LDC Template Tasks

  • Teachers choose texts students will read.
  • Teachers choose products student will produce.
  • Teachers choose content.
  • Teachers consider school, district, and state requirements.

Adding Rigor to the LDC Template Tasks

  • Add additional requirements to the Teaching Task to differentiate or provide additional challenge.
  • Add one or two demands to a prompt.
  • Add demands that align to the appropriate grade-specific standard.
  • Consider the demands when determining…What skills?

D1 Be sure to ______ (acknowledge; refute) competing views. (Argumentation)

  • D1 Be sure to ______ (acknowledge; refute) competing views. (Argumentation)
  • D2 Give (an example; # of examples) from past or current (events; issues) to illustrate and clarify your position. (Argumentation or Informational/Explanatory)
  • D3 What ________ (conclusions; implications) can you draw? (Argumentation or Informational/Explanatory)
  • D4 In your discussion, address the credibility and origin of sources in view of your research topic. (Argumentation or Informational/Explanatory)
  • Demands

Demands, cont.

  • D5 Identify any gaps or unanswered questions. (Argumentation or Informational/Explanatory)
  • D6 Use ________ (stylistic devices) to develop your work. (Argumentation or Informational/Explanatory or Narrative)
  • D7 Use ________ (techniques) to convey multiple storylines. (Argumentation or Informational/Explanatory or Narrative)
  • D8 Include ________ (e.g. bibliography, citations, references, endnotes). (Argumentation or Informational/Explanatory)

LDC Template Task

  • an LDC Teaching Task when completely filled out by the teacher.
  • becomes
  • !

Completed Teaching Task

  • Task Template 14 - Informational or Explanatory
  • How can one geographical location hold meaning for three different religions?  After reading informational texts about Judaism, Islam, and Christianity, and texts about the Temple Mount/Haram Al-Sharif in Jerusalem, write an essay in which you describe the significance of this site to each of these religions and address the question. Support your discussion with evidence from the text(s).

S.N.A.P (Stop Now and Process)

Support for Planning/Developing Modules in PLCs

  • Support for Planning/Developing Modules in PLCs
  • What practices are currently in place to support teachers as they plan?

Professional Learning Communities

  • collegial group who are united in their commitment to an outcome.
  • engage in a variety of activities including sharing a vision, working and learning collaboratively, visiting and observing other classrooms, and participating in shared decision making.
  • Scheduling for PLC’s
  • Disciplinary Literacy
  • Intermediate Literacy
  • Basic Literacy
  • Doug Buehl, Developing Readers in the Academic Disciplines, 2011, p.13, model offered by Shanahan & Shanahan
  • Disciplinary Literacy

Text-Dependent Questions

  • Based on close reading of appropriately complex text
  • Often based on student annotations
  • Promote understanding beyond basic facts
  • Push readers back into texts
  • Include language from the standards/frameworks
  • Cannot be answered unless text has been read and understood

Selecting template based on content standards

    • Selecting template based on content standards
    • Developing Critical Focus Questions
    • Selecting appropriate texts
    • Selecting student products
  • PLCs

Selecting Template Based on Content

Selecting a Template Task

  • Page 33 in guidebook??

Critical Focus Question

  • Pinpoints the important learning that will occur in the content
  • Encourages deep thinking
  • Elicits open-ended thinking
  • Defines what students should know and be able to do throughout the unit of study

Critical Focus Question

  • Should be based on standards
  • Should be significant
  • Should be in simple language
  • Should be thought-provoking
  • Should be important five years from now
  • Should not be answered by a simple “yes” or “no”

Support teachers in considering a variety of texts (discipline-like).

  • Literature: novels, stories, poems, plays
  • Informational texts: newspaper articles, journal articles, primary source documents
  • Opinion pieces: editorials, speeches, essays on an issue
  • Reference works: encyclopedias, almanacs, manuals, how-to books

Support teachers in considering a variety of writing tasks (discipline-like).

  • For an essay, substitute a review, article, editorial, speech or proposal (“I propose amending Arkansas law to require schools to register students as voters on their 18th birthdays. That would be good policy because…”).
  • For a report, substitute an article, lab report, or a manual.
  • For a narrative, substitute an article, account, biography, story, or play script.
  • Encourage teachers to immerse themselves and then their students in the types of writing most common in their fields.

S.N.A.P (Stop Now and Process)

  • #ARLDC

http://www.ldc.org

LDC’s New Look

Coaching during teaching

  • Coaching during teaching
  • Look-fors during implementation
  • Peer visits/peer coaching
  • Next Steps
  • Support in the classroom during an LDC module

Mini-tasks

Mini-Tasks

  • Pacing
  • Skill
  • Product and Prompt
  • Scoring
  • 30 minutes
  • Gather relevant information from multiple primary and secondary sources about immigration laws written between 1880 and 1930; assess credibility of each source; follow a standard citation format
  • Using a note-making method, select information from primary and secondary sources; use strategies for discerning credibility;
  • Notes; evidence of credibility consideration;
  • Selects relevant material to support prompt; applies strategies for assessing credibility;
  • Applies note-making skills

S.N.A.P (Stop Now and Process)

Support after LDC module has

  • Support after LDC module has
  • been taught.
  • Scoring student work (rubric)
  • Using data to inform teaching
  • Reflecting on planning
  • Considering a colleague’s perspective
  • PLC time (I can’t wait to ask about this!)

Student-Centered Coaching Questions

  • What were the learning goals set for students during the teaching? Did they learn? How do you know?
  • [Refer back to the task. Look at What Results? – consider all the mini-tasks]

Student-Centered Coaching Questions

  • How did students respond to various teaching strategies/approaches?
  • [reflect on all mini-tasks; were they on target? What about the pacing of the lessons?]

Student-Centered Coaching Questions

  • Given the students’ response to the teaching strategies/approaches, what would you change in the future and what aspects of the plan/approaches would you retain? Why?
  • [were the mini-tasks appropriate? Were the strategies the most appropriate?]

Student-Centered Coaching Questions

  • What did you do to ensure that students felt confident and comfortable during the learning?
  • [were students ‘with me’ during this series of lessons? Did they really get it?]

“Education research shows that most school variables, considered separately, have at most small effects on learning. The real payoff comes when individual variables combine to reach critical mass.”

  • “Education research shows that most school variables, considered separately, have at most small effects on learning. The real payoff comes when individual variables combine to reach critical mass.”
  • “The School Principal as Leader: Guiding Schools to Better Teaching and Learning”

“It is a fact that in the right formation, the lifting power of many wings can achieve twice the distance of any bird flying alone.” ~Milton Olson~

What does LDC look like in a district?

  • The LDC model is flexible enough to be used in various ways because the core of the work is CCSS implementation with best practices in professional learning and instruction—essential goals in most schools and districts.

  • There are two ways to improve results: redesign the school based on best instructional practices or get new kids.
  • - Tim Westerberg, former high school principal in Littleton, CO

Bringing Out the Best in People

  • Expect the best from people you lead.
  • Study the other person’s needs.
  • Establish high standards for excellence.
  • Create an environment where failure is not fatal.
  • Recognize and applaud achievement.
  • Place a premium on collaboration.
  • Take care to keep your own motivation high.
  • Bringing Out the Best in People, Alan Loy McGinnis, 1985

“Lessons From Inside the Classroom”

  • Pages 6 & 7
  • Pages 10 & 11
  • Pages 11 & 12
  • Pages 13 & 15
  • Pages 17 & 18

I am a teacher serving students under your leadership.

  • How will you as a leader continuously invest in me to increase my effectiveness as an educator?
  • Sphere of Influence in Education
  • Source: Model developed by Stephen Barkley
  • Bringing Out the Best in People: How To Enjoy Helping Others Excel
  • ~Alan Loy McGinnis

Reflection

  • What will you see in an LDC classroom?
  • What will you NOT see in an LDC classroom?
  • What will you see more of/less of?

Tweet About LDC!

  • #ARLDC


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