Lea name: Roanoke Rapids Graded School District



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LEA Name: Roanoke Rapids Graded School District

LEA Code: 421

School: Roanoke Rapids High School

Course Name: Honors English II

Course Code: 1022

Teacher’s Name: Kasey Overton


Electronic submission of this portfolio certifies that honors level course portfolios for each teacher within the LEA have been reviewed using the North Carolina Honors Level Course Implementation Guide and Rubric and that this portfolio has been selected to represent the level of teaching and learning for this honors course across the LEA.

As part of the NCDPI Honors Course Portfolio Review, if you are submitting copyrighted material or material that has a user license, ensure that you have obtained the appropriate permissions to share this information.


I. Curriculum Content


1. Teacher rationale for curriculum content considering vertical alignment for advanced learners (intentional reflection & philosophy)

The tenth grade English curriculum is based on thematic units consisting of Survival, Individual vs. Society, and Freedom vs. Free Will. These topics cover an in-depth study of Common Core State Standards utilizing major texts and ancillary materials, such as short stories, poems/songs, and informational articles. By the end of the course, students will have learned how to identify, analyze, and justify many literary terms including, but not limited to: theme, tone, motif, refinement/development, structure, purpose, rhetoric, etc.


English II puts the focus on fostering growth in students by tapping into their prior knowledge and expanding that knowledge in the hopes that students will become critical thinkers and life-long learners. Honors English II places an emphasis on independent learning, such as Socratic seminars and argumentative, expository, and synthesis essays. Pre-AP strategies are used throughout Honors English II in the hopes that advanced learners will continue higher-level thinking and learning skills into AP English 11.


2. Standards and objectives - how will the required standards and clarifying objectives be taught with extensions beyond the standard level for advanced learners?

Unit I: Survival (7 weeks)

Essential Questions: How far will you go in order to survive?

What does it take to survive?

How is one’s will to survive diminished when their freedom, identity, and dignity is taken away?

Common Core State Standards:

RI.10.1, RI.10.2, RI.10.3, RI.10.5, RI.10.7, RL.10.6, RL.10.3, W.10.2, W.10.4, W.10.5, W.10.10, SL.10.1, SL.10.6, all Language objectives

In Unit I, students expand their knowledge on RI/RL.10.2 (development of theme) and RI/RL10.5 (text structure) by utilizing the memoirs Night and A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier. By reading and analyzing these two texts, students will be able to complete an expository essay in which they discuss character analysis. (English II students will read Night. They will write a narrative essay where they create their own memoir).
Unit II: Individual vs. Society (8 weeks)

Essential Questions: Do individuals control groups, or do groups control individuals? How does society maintain order? What makes an individual powerful?

Common Core State Standards: RL.10.1, RL.10.2, RL.10.3, RI.10.1, RI.10.2, RI.10.5, L.10.1-6, SL.10.1, SL.10.4, SL.10.5, W.10.1, W.10.2, W.10.5, W.10.10

In Unit II, students will expand their knowledge on RL.10.3 (analyze characters) by studying three novels: Anthem, Lord of the Flies, and The Good Earth. Students will complete a character analysis/synthesis essay in which they compare the individual to society used in two of the three novels. (English II students will only read Anthem and complete a character analysis essay).


Unit III: Fate vs. Free Will (4 weeks)

Essential Questions: Do you control your destiny or does everything happen for a reason? How does rhetoric affect a reader? How does Shakespeare examine the themes of fate and free will?

Common Core Objectives: RL.10.1, RL.10.3, RL.10.4, RL.10.5, RL.10.6 RL.10.9, RL.10.10, RI.10.1-10, L.10.1-6, SL.10.1, SL.10.3, SL.10.5, W.10.1

In Unit III, students will extend their knowledge of RL.10.6 (author’s use of rhetoric) by completing an in-depth study of logos, pathos, and ethos while reading Julius Caesar. Students will also study other famous speeches in history to identify and analyze rhetorical devices. Students will then create their own speech by utilizing rhetorical devices. (English II students will read several famous speeches).



Unit IV: Oedipus Rex (3 weeks)

Essential Questions: How does ancient Greek drama differ from modern drama? Do we control our destinies?

How are a country’s leaders a reflection of that country? How do your decisions/actions change or impact

your future? How does Oedipius’ tragic flaw lead to his downfall?

Common Core Objectives: R.L. 10.2, R.L. 10.3, R.L. 10.4, R.L. 10.6, L. 10.1&2, L. 10.5, S.L. 10.1, S.L. 10.5, and W.

10.2


In Unit IV, students will broaden their knowledge of connecting themes throughout literature. Pride is a

connecting theme throughout other novels we read throughout HN English II. Students will also analyze how

Oedipus Rex illustrates tragic heroes, tragic flaws, and other aspects of drama. The difference between English

II and Honors English II is that English II students do not complete the end of unit project.



3. Curriculum Plan (pacing guides, course syllabus, scope & sequence, curriculum maps, etc.)

Honors English II Pacing Guide-Possible Units (Not all units are taught, but are provided)

Unit I: Survival (7 weeks)
Essential Questions: How far will you go in order to survive? What does it take to survive? How is one’s will to survive diminished when their freedom, identity, and dignity is taken away?
Common Core State Standards: RI.10.1, RI.10.2, RI.10.3, RI.10.5, RI.10.7, RL.10.6, RL.10.3, W.10.2, W.10.4, W.10.5, W.10.10, SL.10.1, SL.10.6, all Language objectives
Major Works: A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier, Night
Ancillary Materials: Elie Wiesel’s Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech, President Obama’s Speech on Preventing Mass Atrocities, Three non-fiction articles on human trafficking, Nuremberg Laws, and Three non-fiction articles on boy soldiers in Africa
Poems/Songs: “What Makes a Man,” “Running up That Hill,” “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night,” “Dedication,” “Ghosts That We Knew”
Film: I’m Still Here: documentary of teens during Holocaust
Writing: Expository (Synthesis and Character Analysis), Narrative
Project: Research on Genocides (Google SlideShow Presentation)

Unit II: Individual vs. Society (8 weeks)
Essential Questions: Do individuals control groups, or do groups control individuals? How does society maintain order? What makes an individual powerful?
Common Core State Standards: RL.10.1, RL.10.2, RL.10.3, RI.10.1, RI.10.2, RI.10.5, L.10.1-6, SL.10.1, SL.10.4, SL.10.5, W.10.1, W.10.2, W.10.5, W.10.10
Major Works: Anthem, Lord of the Flies and The Good Earth
Ancillary Materials: “Harrison Bergeron”, non-fiction articles on the roles of men and women in Chinese culture
Poems/Songs: “No Man is an Island”, “Invictus”
Film(s): Divergent, clips of the original Lord of the Flies film
Writing: Argumentative, Expository
Project: Utopia Group Project

Unit III: Fate vs. Free Will (4 weeks)
Essential Questions: Do you control your destiny or does everything happen for a reason? How does rhetoric affect a reader? How does Shakespeare examine the themes of fate and free will?
Common Core Objectives: RL.10.1, RL.10.3, RL.10.4, RL.10.5, RL.10.6 RL.10.9, RL.10.10, RI.10.1-10, L.10.1-6, SL.10.1, SL.10.3, SL.10.5, W.10.1
Major Works: Julius Caesar
Ancillary Materials: “Letter From a Birmingham Jail,” JFK’s Inaugural Address, and MacArthur’s Duty, Honor, Country speech
Poems/Songs: N/A for this unit
Film(s): clips from Julius Caesar and Mean Girls
Writing: Argumentative, Expository
Project: Create argumentative speech using rhetorical devices

Unit IV: Oedipus Rex (3 weeks)
Essential Questions: How does ancient Greek drama differ from modern drama?bDo we control our destinies? How are a country’s leaders a reflection of that country? How do your decisions/actions change or impact your future? How does Oedipius’ tragic flaw lead to his downfall?
Common Core Objectives: R.L. 10.2, R.L. 10.3, R.L. 10.4, R.L. 10.6, L. 10.1&2, L. 10.5, S.L. 10.1, S.L. 10.5, and W. 10.2
Major Works: Oedipus Rex by Sophocles
Ancillary Materials: Video (Introduction to the Greek theatre), Video (elements of Greek theatre and how it is used today), and “The Oedipus Complex” by Sigmund Freud.
Writing:
Argumentative: Do you believe in fate, that every decision we make is predetermined OR do you believe that our future is based on every individual action/decision we make? Students must choose a side and then engage in a class discussion where we hear both sides to this argument.
Informational: Students will write a brief essay where they must identify Oedipus’ tragic flaw (pride/arrogance) and give 3 examples from the play where his pride contributed to his downfall.
Project: Students will be placed into groups and given a specific Act and Scene that they must act out in front of class. Along with this portion of the project, they must also do a writing portion where they must reflect on how acting out the play informed their understanding of the play itself.


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