Italics and quotation marks final summative assessment



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ITALICS AND QUOTATION MARKS FINAL SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT

& ENG 100




PART ONE:

Rewrite the following sentences on the line that follows, correctly using underlining (italics) and quotation marks.



  1. An Introduction to Haiku includes examples of early haiku, the seventeen-syllable Japanese verse form; two of my favorites are New Year’s Day and Seen from Horseback.

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  1. Every time I meet Mrs. Gilley, said Paco, she says, Remember me to your mother.

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  1. Be careful not to confuse allusion with illusion, warned Mrs. Bunnell. When you use either word, remember to spell it with two l’s.

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  1. My grandmother asked what I wanted for my birthday, a subscription to Time or to Popular Mechanics.

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  1. I’m glad that you enjoyed the Ransom of Red Chief, said Joan. Do you plan to read more of O. Henry’s short stories?

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  1. In his book the Medusa and the Snail, Dr. Lewis Thomas includes an essay titled Notes on Punctuation.

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  1. Quotation marks, says Dr. Thomas, should be used honestly and sparingly.

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  1. Dr. Thomas continues, Above all, quotation marks should not be used for ideas that you’d like to disown. Nor should they be put in place around clichés.

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  1. Were you and Sue at the concert? I asked. I didn’t see you come in.

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  1. Dad said, I heard you say, I’ll be home before ten o’clock.

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Part Two

Choose the answer that best uses underlining (italics) and quotation marks.



  1. Have you read the poems In Memoriam and Elegy for J.F. K.?

  1. “Have you read the poems In Memoriam and Elegy for J.F.K.?”

  2. “Have you read the poems In Memoriam and Elegy for J.F.K.”?

  3. Have you read the poems “In Memoriam” and “Elegy for J.F.K.?”

  4. Have you read the poems “In Memoriam” and “Elegy for J.F.K.”?



  1. The movie A Night to Remember is based on the sinking of the luxury ocean liner Titanic.

  1. The movie A Night to Remember is based on the sinking of the luxury ocean liner “Titanic.”

  2. The movie A Night to Remember is based on the sinking of the luxury ocean liner Titanic “.

  3. The movie A Night to Remember is based on the sinking of the luxury ocean liner Titanic.

  4. The movie “A Night to Remember” is based on the sinking of the luxury ocean liner Titanic.



  1. Reprints of the article Fill Your Senses, Light Your Life, which was condensed from the magazine Sports Afield, are available from Reader’s Digest.

  1. Reprints of the article Fill Your Senses, Light Your Life, which was condensed from the magazine “Sports Afield,” are available from “Reader’s Digest.”

  2. Reprints of the article “Fill Your Senses, Light Your Life,” which was condensed from the magazine Sports Afield, are available from Reader’s Digest.

  3. Reprints of the article “Fill Your Senses, Light Your Life”, which was condensed from the magazine Sports Afield, are available from Reader’s Digest.

  4. Reprints of the article Fill Your Senses, Light Your Life, which was condensed from the magazine “Sports Afield”, are available from “Reader’s Digest”.



  1. We’ll be back from Miami, Mother told our neighbors, in two weeks or when our money runs out, whichever comes first.

  1. “We’ll be back from Miami,” Mother told our neighbors, “ in two weeks or when our money runs out, whichever comes first.”

  2. “We’ll be back from Miami”, Mother told our neighbors, “in two weeks or when our money runs out, whichever comes first”.

  3. “We’ll be back from Miami, Mother told our neighbors, in two weeks or when our money runs out, whichever comes first.”

  4. “We’ll be back from Miami, Mother told our neighbors, “in two weeks or when our money runs out, whichever comes first.”



  1. Forget it! Wally shouted. The last time you said, I have a great idea for making money, I wound up without a cent.

  1. “Forget it”! Wally shouted. The last time you said, “I have a great idea for making money, I wound up without a cent”.

  2. “Forget it!” Wally shouted. “The last time you said, ‘ I have a great idea for making money,’ I wound up without a cent’.”

  3. “Forget it!” Wally shouted. “The last time you said, ‘I have a great idea for making money, I wound up without a cent.’”

  4. “Forget it! Wally shouted. The last time you said, I have a great idea for making money, I wound up without a cent.”



  1. The operas The Barber of Seville and The Marriage of Figaro met with royal opposition because both poked fun at the aristocracy.

  1. The operas “The Barber of Seville” and “The Marriage of Figaro” met with royal opposition because both poked fun at the aristocracy.

  2. The operas ‘The Barber of Seville’ and ‘The Marriage of Figaro’ met with royal opposition because both poked fun at the aristocracy.

  3. The operas The Barber of Seville and The Marriage of Figaro met with royal opposition because both poked fun at the aristocracy.

  4. The operas The Barber of Seville and The Marriage of Figaro met with royal opposition because both poked fun at the aristocracy.



  1. I’m from San Juan, the newcomer said. Does anyone here know anything about San Juan?

  1. “I’m from San Juan,” the newcomer said. “Does anyone here know anything about San Juan?”

  2. “I’m from San Juan”, the newcomer said. “Does anyone here know anything about San Juan”?

  3. “I’m from San Juan,” the newcomer said. “Does anyone here know anything about San Juan”?

  4. “I’m from San Juan, the newcomer said. Does anyone here know anything about San Juan?”



  1. Yes, I replied. My parents grew up in San Juan, and I was born there.

  1. “Yes”, I replied. “My parents grew up in San Juan, and I was born there.”

  2. “Yes,” I replied. “My parents grew up in San Juan, and I was born there.”

  3. “Yes,” I replied. “My parents grew up in San Juan, and I was born there”.

  4. “Yes, I replied. ‘My parents grew up in San Juan, and I was born there.’”



  1. Welcome aboard the Molly B., said the skipper. It may look a bit rusty, but it’s still a seaworthy ship.

  1. “Welcome aboard the Molly B.,” said the skipper. “ It may look a bit rusty, but it’s still a seaworthy ship.”

  2. “Welcome aboard the Molly B.”, said the skipper. “It may look a bit rusty, but it’s still a seaworthy ship”.

  3. “Welcome aboard the Molly B.,” said the skipper. “It may look a bit rusty, but it’s still a seaworthy ship.”

  4. “Welcome aboard the Molly B.”, said the skipper. “It may look a bit rusty, but it’s still a seaworthy ship”.



  1. Go out there and fight, ordered the coach. The other team is just as tired as you are.

  1. “Go out there and fight”, ordered the coach. “The other team is just as tired as you are.”

  2. “Go out there and fight, ordered the coach. The other team is just as tired as you are.”

  3. “Go out there and fight, ordered the coach. ‘The other team is just as tired as you are.’”

  4. “Go out there and fight,” ordered the coach. “The other team is just as tired as you are.”


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