Introduction The Evidence that History forgot



Download 209,78 Kb.
Page7/8
Date conversion12.05.2017
Size209,78 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8

Ecology and Conservation




50. Strocchi, Marina, artist.

Hazchem House (Melbourne : Redletter, 1989) poster : screenprint on white paper. 76.0 x 50.8 cm.

Printed by Red Letter Press for the Victorian Ministry for the Arts and the Lance Reichstein Trust in the Ceres (Centre for Education & Research in Environmental Strategies, Brunswick) series.


This poster is accompanied by a selection of other posters and fliers concerned with green issues.

51. God or whoever gave you legs and arms … [ms. sign] 24 x 26 cm. biro on cardboard.

This is a unique piece of handwritten ephemera found at the Mackie Road shops at East Bentleigh, 18th March 2002. The person is berating his fellow shoppers for not picking up rubbish, “Why? Because the drains go to the beach”.



52. Levy, Laurie

We need your help. Join our rescue team for March ’99 / Laurie Levy (Melbourne : Coalition Against Duck Shooting, 1999)

The campaign to ban duck shooting in Australia began in 1986. To this point, three states have banned the recreational shooting of native waterbirds, Western Australia (1990), New South Wales (1995) and Queensland (10 August 2005)



53. Bob Brown talks Tassie Forests with David Risstrom Vic. Greens Senate Candidate. Thursday September 19, Storey Hall, RMIT. [2004]

David Risstrom was a Melbourne City Councillor from 1999 to 2004 when he stepped down to contest the Senate for the Greens. Although he was unsuccessful, he intends running again for the Senate. Tasmanian Senator Bob Brown is the leader of the Greens in Australia.



Olympics

54. 1956 Olympics

This Wall Case is devoted to the 1956 Olympics. It includes a metal wall map, Broadbent’s Melbourne to and fro, Olympic Special, showing the venues for the sports as well as an inset map of the Olympic Village in West Heidelberg.


Among the memorabilia and Olympic ephemera on display are programmes for the opening and closing ceremonies and some of the daily events as well as tickets to the Games. The closing ceremony was preceded by the Olympic Soccer final between USSR and Yugoslavia.

Music and Dance




55. The famous, original and only Lynch family Bellringers. (Melbourne : F. W. Niven, [c1914-17?]) 102 x 39 cm; printed in red and blue; the nine photographic illustrations in blue.

This group of “campanologists” originated in Geelong in 1867 as the Australian Bellringers, changing their name to Lynch Family Bellringers in 1875. They undertook world tours as well as performing regularly on tour in Australia and New Zealand.


As well as performing with the handbells they were glassophonists, being “the originators of this special class of entertainment”. They also played an aluminium organ and “The Marimba Resonators”, “the only instrument of its kind in the world.”
Our copy of the handbill is accompanied by a “Complimentary ticket”,

given for favours shown and on the understanding that the bills are kept in a prominent position until after the performance of the LYNCH FAMILY.


56. Silver, Frank, 1896-1960.

Yes! we have no bananas [music] / by Frank Silver and Irving Cohn. (Sydney : J. Albert & Son, 1923)




57. O’Hagan, Jack

Our Don Bradman [music] / words and music by Jack O'Hagan. (Melbourne : Allans, 1930)

These are examples of items from our extensive sheet music collection. They have bee chosen for their topicality. As the cover says, Yes! We have no bananas was “America’s greatest song craze” in 1923, and is topical again in Australia suffering a shortage of bananas in the after-effects of Cyclone Larry which hit the north Queensland coast on 20th March 2006.


Our Don Bradman was written by Jack O’Hagan, of Road to Gundagai fame, in 1930 and helped raise the Australian cricket star to the status of national idol.

58. Dance cards

On display is a selection of dance cards, mostly from the 1920s and 1930s; many still have their small pencils attached. The custom was for the gentleman to ask the lady early in the night for dances, which she would book-up on her programme.



59. Competition dancing championship. Leggett’s Ballroom, Prahran (1926)

Leggetts Ballroom in Greville Street, Prahran was one of the most popular dance venues in Melbourne. It burned down on 16th April 1976 and the site was sold in 1981 to be re-developed as tennis courts. The location is now apartments.


Flat cases

Monash University

Some of the early ephemera associated with Monash University is on display.


60. Monash University opening ceremony, eleventh of March, nineteen sixty one. [Clayton, Vic. : The University, 1961] 1 sheet : ill., plan ; 50 x 61 cm folded to 25 x 31 cm. plus two invitation cards, one showing a map of the location.

Two copies of this are included; one is open to show the planned lay-out of the University. The buildings numbered in red, i.e. some of the Science buildings, were the only ones operational at the beginning. Monash was planned as essentially a science university.


61. Monash University opening of the Hargrave Library / by Professor Sir Keith Hancock, Saturday 15th December 1962. [Clayton, Vic. : The University, 1962]

Monash University opening of the University Library, Saturday 4th April 1964. [Clayton, Vic. : The University, 1964]

The Science Library was named in honour of Lawrence Hargrave the Australian pioneer aviator. This invitation has, loosely inserted, an explanatory description of the Library’s Mural, “Homage to Lawrence Hargrave”, by John Perceval, written by the artist himself. The Main Library invitation includes a description of the building, “the first major library in Australia to be completely carpeted throughout”, stating that,

Privacy and complete silence can be maintained in the reading areas while a more relaxed atmosphere obtains in the foyers on each floor, where conversation and smoking if permitted.

62. Monash University opening of the Robert Menzies School of Humanities. Saturday, 24th August, 1963. [Clayton, Vic. : The University, 1963]

The Menzies Building opened in stages. The western half, i.e. the section farthest from the Library, was the first to be completed.


1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8


The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2016
send message

    Main page