Introduction: about 60 – 70 words that provides an introduction to your department. The two key things to communicate are why your subject is important and how you go about teaching it



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Name of department: Social Science

Introduction: about 60 – 70 words that provides an introduction to your department. The two key things to communicate are why your subject is important and how you go about teaching it. Beneath the introduction will be the 2015 results – we will set a consistent format for that and pull it directly from the school data. If you want a second, longer, introduction below this, that is fine.
The aim of the Social Science department is to deliver high quality post-16 teaching in an enjoyable environment. We strive for the best for each of our students and expect them to want the best for themselves.

We wish for students to leave our courses with the skills and abilities to help them in their future routes, whether that be higher education or the work place.



KS5: Please note that if you have curriculum plan documents, put them into your folder. You don’t need to re-write it all in this document.


  1. Outline what students study over the course of KS5. Exam board and syllabus. It should explicitly reference what is studied each year. Please outline when controlled assessments or coursework are taking place

  2. Please explain your KS5 homework policy: how often it will be set, what the focus will be, how it will be marked

  3. Any other documents or links you want added, please put below or in folder (e.g. learning sites, blogs, revision guides etc.)

Psychology


Psychology is the scientific study of the human mind and behaviour. It allows students to explore a variety of aspects of human behaviour such as social influence, memory, attachment and biological rhythms. It is a subject that is not only academically beneficial for those studying it but can also be applied to aspects of daily life.
In studying Psychology at A Level students have a variety of options to support their future career aspects. Many of our students go on to studying Psychology at university but for those who are interested in different career paths such as medicine, physiotherapy or even business, Psychology is seen as a facilitating subject.
We follow the AQA exam board specification. All students are provided with access to an online version of the course textbook and this can be accessed from home. A class set of hard copies of this textbook will be used in lessons. We also plan to allocate students a revision guide each which should be returned at the end of the course. Textbooks should be used to support learning in the first instance but should be used in conjunction with other texts and materials. The department subscribes to Psychology Review and articles from this can be photocopied for students to enhance their understanding of the subject and particular topics. We encourage students to subscribe so that they receive their own copy of this magazine. Any students interested should speak to the Head of Department. 

 

The outline of the course is as follows:



 

For current Year 13 students:

 

A2 YEAR

Unit 3: PSYA3


  • Psychology of Relationships

  • Psychology of Aggression

  • Psychology of Eating Behaviour

Unit 4: PSYA4:

  • Schizophrenia

  • The Psychology of Addiction

  • Research methods

 

Exams:

PSYA3 & PSYA4 exams: PSYA3 = 1 hour 30 minutes, PSYA4 = 2 hours

The exam papers at A2 are much more essay focused and most of the questions are in essay form (24 marks per essay). However, the exam board are moving towards asking slightly shorter essays (e.g. 16 marks) and including more shorter answer questions (e.g. 8 marks).

 

For current Year 12 students:

 

Compulsory content:


  • Social influence

  • Memory

  • Attachment

  • Psychopathology

  • Approaches in Psychology

  • Biopsychology

  • Research Methods

  • Issues and Debates

Plus one option from each of the three bands:
1. Relationships or gender or cognition and development (tbc)
2. Schizophrenia or eating behaviour or stress (tbc)
3. Aggression or forensic psychology or addiction (tbc)

A LEVEL PSYCHOLOGY - ASSESSMENT

Paper 1: Introductory topics in psychology
Includes: Social influence, memory, attachment and psychopathology

Paper 2: Psychology in context
Includes: Approaches in psychology, biopsychology, research methods

Paper 3: Issues and options in psychology
Includes: Issues and debates in psychology and the three options chosen

Each exam is a 2 hour exam and worth 33.3% of the A Level qualification. Each exam includes a combination of multiple choice, short answer and extended writing questions.




Exam Papers:

Exam papers are available on the AQA website and examples of these will also be used in lessons and for homework. Exam style questions will be used in class and for milestone assessments. 

 

Extension activities will be used in lessons to challenge students' thinking. 


Enrichment Activities for Psychology –
Film Club - Students are invited to take part in a film club which runs on the first Monday of every month. During these sessions students at JRCS get the chance to explore current and previous films that have explore the role of Psychology. Examples include the film Red Lights (2012). A pair of professional sceptics try and prove that a famous psychic is lying about his ability. This film explores the role of Anomalistic Psychology and research methods.
Trips – Students in Psychology are given the opportunity to attend Psychology conferences held by professional examiners and lead specialists. The purpose of these visits are to allow students in psychology to engage with the content in an exciting and enlightening manner.
University Taster Sessions - All psychology students at JRCS are offered the opportunity to engage in university taster sessions at a variety of London universities. During these sessions students are given the chance to take part in lectures, group discussions and at times even design their own experiments. Students are also given the opportunity to work clinical and occupational psychologists.

Government and Politics


We follow the Edexcel Government and Politics course. The outline of the course is as follows.

 

AS YEAR



Unit 1: People and Politics

  • Democracy and Political Participation

  • Party Policies and Ideas

  • Elections

  • Pressure Groups

Unit 2: Governing the UK

  • The Constitution

  • Parliament

  • The Prime Minister and Cabinet

  • Judges and Civil Liberties

 

A2 YEAR

Unit 3: Key Themes in Political Analysis

  • Liberalism

  • Conservatism

  • Socialism

  • Anarchism

Unit 4: Extended Themes in Political Analysis

  • Nationalism

  • Feminism

  • Ecologism

  • Multiculturalism

 

Exams:

You will sit 4 exams in Politics, 2 in the AS year and 2 in the A2 year.

Exams will be sat during the summer exam period in both years.

 

Unit 1 exam: 1 hour 20 minutes

You will have to answer questions drawn from the material covered in unit 1.

 

You will have to complete two structured questions from a choice of four. Each question will be broken down into 5, 10, and 25 marks.



v      The 5-mark questions will require you to demonstrate your knowledge and understanding.

v      The 10-mark questions will require you to demonstrate your knowledge and understanding, as well as analyse and evaluate political information, arguments and explanations.

v      The 25-mark questions will require you to demonstrate knowledge and understanding, analyse and evaluate political information and construct and communicate coherent arguments.

This examination will be marked out of a total of 80 marks.

Unit 2 exam: 1 hour 20 minutes

You will have to answer questions drawn from the material covered in unit 2.

You will be required to answer one stimulus based question from a choice of two. These questions will be broken down into 5, 10 and 25 marks.

v      The 5-mark questions will require you to demonstrate your knowledge and understanding.

v      The 10-mark questions will require you to demonstrate your knowledge and understanding, as well as to analyse and evaluate political information, arguments and explanations.

v      The 25-mark questions will require you to demonstrate knowledge and understanding, analyse and evaluate political information and construct and communicate coherent arguments.

v      You will then be required to answer one extended question from a choice of two (worth 40 marks), where you will be required to demonstrate your knowledge and understanding as well as your ability to analyse and evaluate political information and to construct and communicate coherent arguments.

This examination will be marked out of a total of 80 marks.

 

Unit 3 & 4 exams: 1 hour 30 minutes each

You are required to answer three short answer questions from a choice of five (15 marks each). You are then required to answer one essay question from a choice of three (45 marks).

Exam papers

Exam papers are available on the Edexcel website and examples of these will also be used in lessons and for homework.  Exam style questions will be used in class and for milestone assessments. 


Enrichment:
Film Club - Students are invited to take part in a film club which runs on the first Monday of every month. During these sessions students at JRCS get the chance to explore current and previous films that have explore the role of social science and politics.
Trips: Students are given the enlightening opportunity to visit the Houses of Parliament to enable them to understand the political system of the UK in more depth. Students are also invited to attend a student conference with MP speakers to gain further knowledge and experience of the UK democratic system.


EPQ


EXTENDED PROJECT QUALIFICATION (EPQ)

This level 3 qualification from AQA is the equivalent to an AS level. It is a 1 year course and it is vital for you to adhere to deadlines in order to achieve success.

The EPQ provides an exciting opportunity for you to conduct your own research, something you are interested in or enthusiastic about, but may not be available as part of your formal studies. You will gain valuable UCAS points on completion.

You decide on a project that you wish to carry out, in consultation with your supervisor and centre co-ordinator, complete the project and submit it within a time frame. An extended project may be an extension of an aspect of your main programme of study, or a totally separate topic in which you have a personal interest. We strongly recommend that you select an area that is completely different from your main programme of study.

This qualification is very flexible and taps into your creativity and interests, giving you significant input into choice and design. Your project can be submitted in any format appropriate to the topic. It may consist of an extended written report / essay, an investigation or piece of practical work, a performance, a piece of creative work or any other form such as a model, creative piece of writing, or multimedia presentation.

The potential benefits of EPQ are enormous. It allows you to have the opportunity to get deeply involved in a subject that interests you, to develop research skills, to pull together different areas of other subjects you are studying and to develop extended writing skills. These skills are all valuable preparation for going to university. The extra UCAS points it attracts can make a difference to the success of your university application. The EPQ is a well-respected qualification amongst universities.

 

So, what do I have to do?

- Devise, design and plan the project

- Research, select, organise and use information and resources

- Analyse data, apply findings and demonstrate understanding of any links, connections and complexities of the topic

- Select and use a range of skills to carry out the project and achieve planned outcomes

- Engage in extended academic project writing

- Evaluate the project outcomes in relation to stated objectives and own learning and performance

- Present the project using a choice of communication skills and media

- Reflect on your performance and outcomes

 

How will I be assessed?

There are 4 assessment objectives (AO's) on which your work is assessed:

AO1 – Manage the project

This is worth 20% of the marks. Marks are awarded on your ability to identify, design, plan, and complete the individual project, or task within a group project, applying organisational skills and strategies to meet stated objectives.



AO2 - Use Resources/Research

This is worth 20% of the marks. Marks are awarded on your ability to obtain and select information from a range of sources, analyse data, apply relevantly, and demonstrate understanding of any appropriate links, connections and complexities of your topic.



AO3 - Develop and Realise the project

This is worth 40% of the marks. Marks are awarded on your ability to select and use a range of skills, including new technologies, to solve problems, to take decisions critically, creatively and flexibly, and to achieve planned outcomes.



AO4 – Review the project

This is worth 20% of the marks. Marks are awarded on your ability to evaluate outcomes including own learning and performance. Select and use a range of communication skills and media to convey and present evidenced outcomes and conclusions.

Enrichment:

Trips: There a variety of trips for students in the EPQ course. All students are invited to attend a day trip to Southampton University for an inspiring session on research methods and resources. Students are given the opportunity to access a wide variety of resources including the university library and access to journals to aid their independent projects.


IFS


Certificate In Financial Studies (CeFS)

Awarded by IFS

This course will appeal to students who:



  • have an interest in how money works and discussing a wide range of issues with its use;

  • enjoy expressing their opinions and justifying their comments;

  • enjoy studying a subject which is relevant to their own lives and experiences and points out some of the problems when dealing with money;

This is one of only 2 AS level courses that awards the A* grade.

Structure of CeFS

CeFS consists of two units made up of 30 credits.



Unit 1 – Financial Capability for the Immediate and Short Term (FCIS)

By studying FCIS students will gain an appreciation of why money is important through focusing on what money is, attitudes to it, and how it can affect life choices. The unit introduces students to the financial services industry by focusing on the interaction between money, personal finance and the financial services market place. They will gain an appreciation of the differentiation of financial products for savings and the key features of interest and charges on borrowing.

FCIS has been accredited with 15 credits on the QCF.

Unit 2 – Financial Capability for the Medium and Long Term (FCML)

By studying FCML students will gain the ability to plan and manage their financial needs in the medium and long term, with particular reference to the importance of the need to budget for future aspirations and life events. Learners will consider the changing priorities attached to needs, wants and aspirations as individuals progress through the personal life cycle and the role of financial services in assisting lifelong financial planning. Students will gain an understanding of the personal approaches that individuals take towards risk and rewards and the impact of foreseen and unforeseen influences on financial budgeting.

FCML has been accredited with 15 credits on the QCF.

Assessment methodology of CeFS

Both units will be assessed by e-test / written paper made up of the following components:

l Part A – 45-minute multiple-choice examination: 35 x 1 mark for each correct answer (total marks: 35 / 100)

l Part B – 105-minute examination based on a pre-released case study requiring essay responses to 5 questions

l Part B – spelling, punctuation and grammar to be marked through the essay responses (total marks 5 / 100)

A total of 200 marks are available from both units comprising 100 marks per unit.

The pass mark for each component of the unit assessment will be 40%.

 

Grading system

Grade UCAS Tariff points

 A*

70 

 A

 60

 B

 50

 C

 40

 D

 30

 E

 20


HOMEWORK POLICY

At A level, homework is an essential part of exam preparation. Students are expected to match the number of hours in lessons with additional reading and homework outside of the lesson. Some of this will be formally set work in the form of questions, essays, preparation etc. However, students are also expected to take responsibility for re-reading the material covered in class, reading around the material and preparing revision notes in their own time.




Enrichment: please include information here about the enrichment opportunities offered by your department. These would typically include clubs, trips, online departmental areas besides the website and school events


Marking policy: below is a summary of the school marking policy, it will form the top section for each department. Underneath this you can add any amendments specific to your subject.
At the core of our approach to marking at JRCS is task marking. Please see the link below which explains what it is and how we apply it at JRCS.
T:\Teaching and Learning Policy 2014-15\Task marking at JRCS Nov 15.docx
In non-practical subjects one substantial piece of work will be task marked at least once every eight hours of teaching. Students will respond to the tasks and they will be checked by staff. In between that time students’ work may be peer or self-assessed or briefly checked by staff.
It is likely the same piece of work will be assessed for literacy. Staff will mark work using the literacy marking code:



Sp spelling mistake

P punctuation mark missing or incorrectly used

Voc incorrect use of vocabulary

^ word missed out of sentence

~ unclear meaning or grammar within a sentence

// new paragraph required

CL capital letter error

Levelling and Assessment
KS5
At KS5 students take a series of VIMAs (Sixth Form Milestone Assessments) during their course. Students receive developmental comments to help them improve their work. Each VIMA result includes four parts: the grade for that assessment, a comparison of the grade with their expected progress grade (EPG), a Learning Capability mark and a prediction of their end of year grade (PEG). The outcomes of these assessments and other graded work will be in student folders. They are also sent home to parents. A summary of VIMA marks and the students’ expected progress grade is also recorded in their planner.
The following should be notes about marking and assessment in this subject:
School policy used for all subjects.
Psychology – In psychology the students work will be regularly marked according to the school policy combined with the AQA board requirements. Knowledge is assessed using clear assessment objectives (AO’s). Assessment objectives (AOs) are set by Ofqual and are the same across all AS and A-level Psychology specifications and all exam boards. The exams will measure how students have achieved the following assessment objectives.


  • AO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of scientific ideas, processes, techniques and procedures.




  • AO2: Apply knowledge and understanding of scientific ideas, processes, techniques and procedures:
    - in a theoretical context
    - in a practical context
    - when handling qualitative data
    - when handling quantitative data.




  • AO3: Analyse, interpret and evaluate scientific information, ideas and evidence, including in relation to issues, to:
    - make judgements and reach conclusions
    - develop and refine practical design and procedures.







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