Information about feedback on your aa100 end-of-course assessment (‘eca’)



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Information about feedback on your AA100 end-of-course assessment (‘ECA’)

You will receive some feedback on your end-of-course assessment. Feedback will be presented on your ‘ECA performance profile’, which you can view online when you receive your grade. Your performance profile is based on the judgement made by the Examination and Assessment Board on different aspects of your work. The feedback is not as detailed as the feedback you will receive from your own tutor for Assignments 01 to 07, but we hope that will be helpful to you in progressing your studies.

The performance profile evaluates your performance in eight categories. We have chosen categories which, we hope, will be particularly useful to you in understanding what you have achieved and what you need to work on in future. The categories reflect the grading criteria set out in the Assignment Booklet (Section 6), together with the questions and guidance notes.

Please note, though, that in grading your work, the AA100 script markers will use the grading criteria and the guidance notes, just as with Assignments 01 to 07. The ECA performance profile has been designed for the purpose of feedback only.

The categories are listed in the table below. We hope that most, if not all, of them are self-explanatory, but we have included brief explanations, relating them to the grading criteria.



Category

Explanation

‘The essay drew on a range of course materials’


As the grading criteria in the Assignment Booklet state, a good essay will be well-supported by evidence or argument. To achieve this, your essay will need have drawn on evidence and examples from several sections or chapters in Book 4, since the questions and guidance notes explicitly ask you to do this.

‘The essay focused on issues and examples that were relevant to the question’

The grading criteria suggest that a good essay is one that is relevant to the question …

‘The essay presented a coherent and well-substantiated argument’

… well-argued…

‘The essay had a clear and helpful structure’

…and well-constructed.

‘The essay made good use of course concepts to analyse objects or texts’

A good essay will demonstrate that you have grasped the course materials, by making good use of the concepts or ideas introduced in the course – for example, in showing that you understand the limitations of using a photograph as a piece of historical evidence; or that you understand how an artist might use a particular kind of brushstroke to achieve a certain effect.

‘The essay was clearly written and in a style appropriate to academic writing.’

The grading criteria suggest that a good essay will be written clearly and effectively. This implies, in part, that it will have been presented in a relatively formal way – making appropriate use of paragraphs and punctuation, avoiding contractions or popular expressions (‘over the top’), and so on.

‘Sources were referenced as required.’

As with any other assignment, the sources that you have used (including the course book) should have been carefully referenced…

‘The references and bibliography were presented in a clear and consistent way.’

…and your references and bibliography should have been well-presented.

Your performance in these eight categories will be rated on the following scale: outstanding, excellent, well-achieved, achieved, just achieved, not quite achieved, not achieved. The table below explains how these ratings should be interpreted.

Please do bear in mind, though, that two essays that attract the same grade might produce performance profiles that look very different: for example, one essay might be rated ‘achieved’ across the board, while the other is rated as ‘excellent’ in several categories and as ‘not quite achieved’ in others. In addition, not all the categories are equally relevant to the final grade of your essay. Hence, there is no simple formula linking your grade to your feedback.



Rating

Explanation

Outstanding

This implies that your performance in this category was the best, or perhaps beyond, what could be expected at this level. An essay that achieves a very good distinction might be rated as ‘outstanding’ in one or more categories. But outstanding performance is not required for a distinction.

Excellent

This implies that your performance in this category was what might be expected of an essay that has safely achieved a distinction. An essay that achieves a distinction might be rated as ‘excellent’ in several categories.

Well-achieved

This implies that your performance in this category was considerably above the minimum that might be expected of an essay at this level. An essay that is close to a distinction might be rated as ‘well-achieved’ in several categories.

Achieved

This implies that your performance in this category was comfortably above the minimum that might be expected of an essay at this level. An essay that has easily passed might be rated as ‘achieved’ in several categories.

Just achieved

This implies that your performance in this category was just above the minimum that might be expected of an essay at this level. An essay that is just above the pass/fail borderline might be rated as ‘just achieved’ in several categories.

Not quite achieved

This implies that your performance in this category was a little below what might be expected of an essay at this level. An essay that is just below the pass/fail borderline might be rated as ‘not quite achieved’ in several categories.

Not achieved

This implies that your performance in this category was clearly below what might be expected of an essay at this level. An essay that is graded as a fail or a bad fail might be rated as ‘not achieved’ in several categories.

Finally, you will also be told whether your essay was about the right length, too long or too short. An essay that is more than 10% over-length will have been penalised.


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