Hsc (Standard) English Course Outline 2004 / 2005



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HSC (Standard) English – Course Outline 2004 / 2005


Teacher

Module

Text

Rhodes

12E4


Area of Study
Physical Journeys

Stimulus Booklet
Drama -
Away, M Gow




Module A: Experience Through Language

Elective 3: Image



Poetry

Samuel Wagan Watson




Module B: Close Study of Text

Film
Witness




Module C: Texts and Society

Elective 1: The Institution and Individual Experience



Prose Fiction
Raw, S Monk

Hartley

12E5


Area of Study
Physical Journeys

Stimulus Booklet
Drama -
Away, M Gow




Module A: Experience Through Language

Elective 3: Image



Poetry

Samuel Wagan Watson




Module B: Close Study of Text

Film
Witness




Module C: Texts and Society

Elective 1: The Institution and Individual Experience



Prose Fiction
Raw, S Monk

Hill

12E6


Area of Study
Physical Journeys

Stimulus Booklet
Drama -
Away, M Gow




Module A: Experience Through Language

Elective 3: Image



Poetry

Samuel Wagan Watson




Module B: Close Study of Text

Film
Witness




Module C: Texts and Society

Elective 1: The Institution and Individual Experience



Prose Fiction
Raw, S Monk

Leitch

12E7


Area of Study

Physical Journeys



Stimulus Booklet

Non-Fiction - Lionheart, J Martin




Module A: Experience through Language

Elective 2: Dialogue



Drama

The Club, D Williamson




Module B: Close Study of Text

Poetry

Wilfred Owen




Module C: Texts and Society

Elective 1: The Institution and Individual Experience



Prose Fiction

Raw, S Monk

HSC (Standard) English – Text Selection 2004 / 2005


The following table has been provided to outline the Area Of Study, Modules and texts that have been selected for study by Year 12 in 2004 / 2005.




Standard



Prose Fiction



Drama




Poetry


Non-fiction or Film or Media or Multi-media

Area of Study:

The Journey
Focus: Physical Journeys




Away


Michael Gow

(12E4, 5 & 6)





Lionheart


Jesse Martin

(12E7)


Module A:



Experience Through Language





The Club


David Williamson

(12E7)




Samuel Wagan Watson

(12E4, 5 & 6)






Module B:



Close Study of Text











Wilfred Owen


(12E7)

Witness


Peter Weir

(12E4, 5 & 6)



Module C:



Texts and Society

Raw


Scott Monk

(12E4, 5, 6 & 7)















Area of Study: The Journey

The new BOS English Stage 6 Prescriptions for the HSC 2004/5 is the basis of the course. For this cycle a new Area of Study: The Journey has been introduced. There are three possible focuses in exploring this concept of The Journey: ‘Physical Journeys’; ‘Imaginative Journeys’; and ‘Inner Journeys’.



Focus: Physical Journeys

Through this focus, students explore the ways in which texts depict physical journeys and their impact. Physical journeys involve different types of obstacles and movement to new places. They provide opportunities for travelers to extend themselves physically, intellectually and emotionally as they respond to challenges and learn more about themselves and the world around them. Students examine the underlying assumptions about these physical journeys and consider the power of the physical journey to challenge their thinking. In their responding and composing, students reflect on the ways these physical journeys broaden their understanding of the world and themselves.


English (Standard) Outcomes


These outcomes are derived from the English (Standard) objectives and the content of the Preliminary and HSC courses. They specify the intended result of student learning.


Preliminary

HSC

1. A student demonstrates understanding of the relationships between composer, responder, text and context.

1. A student demonstrates understanding of how relationships between composer, responder, text and context shape meaning.

2. A student identifies and describes relationships among texts.

2. A student demonstrates understanding of the relationships among texts.

3. A student develops language relevant to the study of English.

3. A student develops language relevant to the study of English.

4. A student identifies and describes language forms and features and structures of particular texts that shape meaning and influence responses.

4. A student describes and analyses the ways that language forms and features, and structures of texts shape meaning and influence responses.

5. A student describes the ways different technologies and media of production affect the language and structure of particular texts.

5. A student analyses the effect of technology and medium on meaning.

6. A student engages with a wide range of texts to develop a considered and informed personal response.

6. A student engages with the details of text in order to respond critically and personally.

7. A student selects appropriate language forms and features, and structures of texts to explore and express ideas and values.

7. A student adapts and synthesises a range of textual features to explore and communicate information, ideas and values for a variety of purposes, audiences and contexts.

8. A student articulates and represents own ideas in critical, interpretive and imaginative texts.

8. A student articulates and represents own ideas in critical, interpretive and imaginative texts from a range of perspectives.

9. A student assesses the appropriateness of a range of processes and technologies in the investigation and organisation of information and ideas.

9. A student assesses the appropriateness of a range of processes and technologies in the investigation and organisation of information and ideas.

10. A student analyses and synthesises information and ideas from a range of texts for a variety of purposes, audiences and contexts.

10. A student analyses and synthesises information and ideas into sustained and logical argument for a range of purposes and audiences.

11. A student draws upon the imagination to transform experience into text.

11. A student draws upon the imagination to transform experience and ideas into text, demonstrating control of language.

12. A student reflects on own processes of responding and composing.

12. A student reflects on own processes of responding and composing.

13. A student reflects on own processes of learning.

13. A student reflects on own processes of learning.

English (Advanced) Outcomes

These outcomes are derived from the English (Advanced) Objectives and the content of the Preliminary and HSC courses. They specify the intended result of student learning.



Preliminary

HSC

1. A student describes and explains the relationships between composer, responder, text and context in particular texts.

1. A student explains and evaluates the effects of different contexts of responders and composers on texts.

2. A student describes and explains relationships among texts.

2. A student explains relationships among texts.




2A. Advanced only

A student recognises different ways in which particular texts are valued.



3. A student develops language relevant to the study of English.

3. A student develops language relevant to the study of English.

4. A student describes and explains the ways in which language forms and features, and structures of particular texts shape meaning and influence responses.

4. A student explains and analyses the ways in which language forms and features, and structures of texts shape meaning and influence responses.

5. A student demonstrates an understanding of the ways various textual forms, technologies and their media of production affect meaning.

5. A student explains and evaluates the effects of textual forms, technologies and their media of production on meaning.

6. A student engages with a wide range of texts to develop a considered and informed personal response.

6. A student engages with the details of text in order to respond critically and personally.

7. A student selects appropriate language forms and features, and structures to explore and express ideas and values.

7. A student adapts and synthesises a range of textual features to explore and communicate information, ideas and values, for a variety of purposes, audiences and contexts.

8. A student articulates and represents own ideas in critical, interpretive and imaginative texts.

8. A student articulates and represents own ideas in critical, interpretive and imaginative texts from a range of perspectives.

9. A student assesses the appropriateness of a range of processes and technologies in the investigation and organisation of information and ideas.

9. A student evaluates the effectiveness of a range of processes and technologies for various learning purposes including the investigation and organisation of information and ideas.

10. A student analyses and synthesises information and ideas from a range of texts for a variety of purposes, audiences and contexts.

10. A student analyses and synthesises information and ideas into sustained and logical argument for a range of purposes, audiences and contexts.

11. A student draws upon the imagination to transform experience into text.

11. A student draws upon the imagination to transform experience and ideas into text demonstrating control of language.

12. A student reflects on own processes of responding and composing.

12. A student reflects on own processes of responding and composing.

12A. Advanced only

A student demonstrates a capacity to understand and use different ways of responding to and composing particular texts.



12A. Advanced only

A student explains and evaluates different ways of responding to and composing text.



13. A student reflects on own processes of learning.

13. A student reflects on own processes of learning.


ASSESSMENT #4 – HSC (Standard) English


Module B: Close Study of Text
This module requires students to engage in detailed analysis of a text. It develops students’ understanding of how the ideas, forms and language of a text interact within the text and may affect those responding to it.
Each elective in this module involves close study of a single text from a list of prescribed texts.
Students engage with the text to respond imaginatively, affectively and critically. They explore and analyse particular characteristics of the text, considering how these shape meaning. They also consider the way in which these characteristics establish the text’s distinctive qualities. Composition focuses on meaning shaped in and through the text. These compositions may be realized in a variety of forms and media.
Elective: Poetry
Students choose the prescribed selection from the works of ONE of the following poets, explore the individuality of each poem and draw conclusions about the nature and concerns of the poet’s work.
Elective: Nonfiction, Film, Media or Multimedia
Students will study ONE of the set texts and explore its expression of ideas, considering its medium of production.

Type of Text To Be Assessed Essay



Assessment Weighting 15%

Task Length 45 minutes to write after listening to the extract

twice


Task Conditions In-class task

Modes Listening and Writing

Due Date Term 2, Week 4, 2005

Board of Studies Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 10
Assessment Task
In your study of Module B, your main text dealt with violence. The speech that you will listen to also deals with violence.
Essay Question: How does the composer of your set text and the speaker (that you will hear) use language to discuss the theme of violence?
NOTE: The passage will be played twice

You should listen for and comment on BOTH tone of voice AND language used.


Assessment Criteria


  • Demonstrates knowledge and understanding of verbal language features and the ways in which they shape meaning

  • Uses appropriate terminology and conventions of English to show meaning

  • Understands the concept of listening to a specific text to show interpretation

  • Responds with details of the text in sustained writing
ASSESSMENT #5 – HSC (Standard) English


Module C: Texts And Society
This module requires students to explore and analyse texts used in a specific situation. It assists students’ understanding of the ways that texts communicate information, ideas, bodies of knowledge, attitudes and belief systems in ways particular to specific areas of society.
Electives in this module are designed around a specific social context and the tests that are characteristic of and valued within it. Prescribed texts will be drawn from a variety of professional and social contexts. Students are also required to supplement this study with texts of their own choosing related to the module.
Students explore the role of textual features in the shaping of meaning in specific contexts. They develop the communication skills necessary for a wide variety of personal, social, historical, cultural and workplace contexts. Composition focuses on analyzing and experimenting with textual forms characteristic of the specific contexts. These compositions may be realised in a variety of forms and media.
Elective 1: The Institution and Individual Experience
In this elective students will explore a variety of texts that deal with the effects of the institution on individuals which can be both positive and negative. Students will respond to and compose a range of texts that demonstrate protest and compliance. They will examine the features of texts that show the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs relating to the institution and individual experience.
Students will study ONE text as the basis for their further exploration of the effect of the institution on individual experience.

Type of Text To Be Assessed Feature article

Assessment Weighting 15%

Task Length Between 750 – 1000 words

Task Conditions Take –home task

Modes Reading, Writing, Viewing and Representing

Due Date Term 2, Week 10, 2005

Board of Studies Outcomes 2, 3, 5, 12 and 13
Assessment Task
You have been invited to contribute a feature article to a website for HSC students. Your feature article should communicate information and ideas about this elective, The Institution and Individual Experience.
In your answer you should refer to your prescribed text, and at least ONE related text of your own choosing.
Assessment Criteria


  • Demonstrate analysis of the ways texts and meaning are shaped by context

  • Organise, develop and express ideas using language appropriate to audience, purpose and form



HSC (Standard) English 2004 / 2005
The HSC (Standard) English Course is designed to assist students to become proficient in English to enhance their personal, social and vocational lives. The course provides students with the opportunity to become confident and effective communicators and to enjoy the variety and breadth of English texts reflected in the modes of reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing and representing.

Course Requirements
In the HSC English (Standard) Course students reflect on and demonstrate the effectiveness of texts for different audiences and purposes.
Text Requirements


  • The close study of a least four types of prescribed text, one drawn from each of the following categories:-

- prose fiction


- drama
- poetry
- nonfiction or film or media or multimedia texts


  • A wide range of additional related texts and textual forms




  • Prescribed stimulus booklet.

The course has two sections and the requirements listed above apply to both sections.





Section 1
Content common to the Standard and Advanced course where students analyse and explore texts and apply skills in synthesis.

The HSC common content consists of one Area of Study common to the HSC Standard and Advanced courses.





Section 2
Modules which emphasise particular aspects of shaping meaning and demonstration of the effectiveness of texts for different audiences and purposes.

Students are required to choose one elective from each of Modules A, B and C.





Study in the HSC course requires close study of particular texts, supported by students’ own wide reading. (BOS English Stage 6 Syllabus - Standard p. 31)




HSC (Standard) English

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