Homework this Week



Download 14,92 Kb.
Date conversion19.05.2017
Size14,92 Kb.

HOMEWORK This Week

  • Continue building your Works Cited Page.
  • Find at least 5 sources of at least 3 kinds to support your arguments.
  • (e.g. Newspapers/Magazines, Surveys, Books, etc.)
  • Be careful not to seek out only one opinion about your topic. Look for a wide variety of perspectives on your topic.
  • Revise your Persuasive Essay:
    • Change the order of two sentences.
    • Rewrite two sentences to use parallelism.
    • Replace passive verbs with active verbs
    • Change general words to specific words
  • Finish Fallacies Worksheet

Works Cited

  • When you use other people’s ideas in a researched essay, you must cite your sources within the essay. In some cases you may also need to provide full citations at the end of the essay to show where to find the original sources.
  • Alphabetical by author’s last name
  • Different formats for different types of entries
        • See Handout

Works Cited

  • Hermans, Stephen. “Fernando Pessoa’s Lisbon of Disquiet.” Literary Traverler. 1 June 2010. Web. 20 Nov. 2012
  • Wharton, Edith. “The Other Two.” 50 Great Short Stories. Ed. Milton Crane. New York: Bantam Dell, 2005. Print.
  • Thomas, Rob. “Short Stories Harvest Emotional Landscapes.” The Capital Times. 25 Aug. 2006. Print
  • Order: Hermas, Thomas, Wharton

Works Cited

  • Trade papers with a partner. Check Formatting for errors.
  • Alphabetical by author’s last name
  • Different formats for different types of entries
        • See Handout

Writing

  • Instructor: Mr. Faires
  • Week 12, Fall 2015
  • Critical Reading & Writing

Warm - Up

  • Write an explanation. What are the problems of reasoning in this passage.
    • Bicycles are a means of transportation, and we all know that transportation is vital to American commerce. If we get rid of all the current bike lanes, there will be less bikes, hence less transportation. Getting rid of bicycle lanes would cripple American trade entirely.
  • No more than 1 page long.
  • Did you finished early? Edit!
  • You have 10 min

Review: Read Critically

  • 1. Ask Questions
  • 2. Examine the Assumptions of an Argument
  • Identify the Main Argument
  • Analyze & criticize the Argument
  • Assess the Evidence
  • Answer: Are the conclusions supported by the evidence?
  • What are the Alternatives?

Review: Write Critically

  • 1. Introduce your Argument Clearly
  • 2. Clearly Present your Evidence in a Logical Flow that Leads to your Conclusion
  • 3. Keep a Balanced Discussion Focused on the Specific Topic
  • 4. Recognize the Limitations in Your Own Evidence
  • 5. Recognize the Limits of the Conclusion

Common Logical Fallacies

  • 1. Non Sequitur (it does not follow)
  • 2. Hasty Generalization
  • 3. Ad hominem (against the man)
  • 4. Bandwagon
  • 5. Red herring (distraction from the point)
  • 6. Either/Or Oversimplification (False Dichotomy)
  • 7. False Analogy
  • 8. Slippery Slope
  • 9. False Cause (Post hoc, Ergo Propter hoc)
  • 10. Begging the Question

Common Logical Fallacies

  • 1. Non Sequitur (it does not follow)
  • Billy Joe is honest: therefore, he will get a good job.
  • 2. Hasty Generalization
  • Teenagers are reckless drivers.
  • 3. Ad hominem (against the man)
  • His arguments might impress us more if he didn’t have false teeth.
  • 4. Bandwagon
  • Everyone else is cheating, so why shouldn’t I?
  • 5. Red herring (distraction from the point)
  • Why worry about a few terrorists when we ought to be doing something about acid rain?

Common Logical Fallacies

  • 6. Either/Or Oversimplification (False Dichotomy)
  • We have only two choices: ban nuclear weapons or destroy the earth.
  • 7. False Analogy
  • Since the books are about the same length and cover the same material, one is probably as good as the other.
  • 8. Slippery Slope
  • Eating sugar will make your teeth fall out.
  • 9. False Cause (Post hoc, Ergo Propter hoc)
  • The new mayor took office last January, and crime in the streets has already increased 25 percent.
  • 10. Begging the Question
  • He is lazy because he doesn’t like to work.

Logical Fallacies

  • In support of her argument that global warming is damaging the environment, Susan cites Al Gore’s movie An Inconvenient Truth. However, Gore was a terrible Vice President and his hair looks greasy.
  • Ad hominem (against the man)
  • Nine months after George W. Bush took office January 2001, the economy took a nosedive. Thousands of jobs were lost and the stock market dropped by more than 30%. This demonstrates that Bush was a poor economic leader.
  • False Cause

Logical Fallacies

  •  All people have a right to freedom of speech because people should be able to say what they want to say.
  •  Begging the question
  • In 2007, carbon emissions grew globally by approximately 8.8%. The following year, cancer diagnoses increased at approximately the same rate. This indicates that carbon emissions cause cancer.
  • False Cause
  • If we allow power to stay on all the time in students dormitories, they will stay up too late playing video games. They will be too tired to study, will fail their exams, not graduate, and RUC will no longer be one of China’s top universities.
  • Slippery Slope

Logical Fallacies

  • I know the Professor said that the Bridges of Madison County was smarmy trash and lacked any artistic worth. But I still think he's wrong. After all, it was on the best-seller list for over 100 weeks
  • Band Wagon
  • BONUS:
  • Your honor, the defendant must be guilty because no one can prove his innocence.
  • Argument from ignorance (type of False Dichotomy)

Logical Fallacies: your papers

Sample

  • Heavy punishment = revenge
  • “[Rome] thought the heavy punishment could raise fear and therefore crimes would be stopped. But the fact was not as expected, even the emperor of Rome was murdered. From this historical fact, we can find that we can find that revenge can’t stop crime.”
  • Can you see a logical weakness?

Sample

  • “To provide another angle, research has been done that people can only be really close to less than 10 people due to the brain capacity, and therefore, wider and easier connections do more good than harm, in terms of interpersonal relationships.”
  • Can you see a logical weakness?

Analysis or your work

  • Trade papers with another student
  • What are their assumptions?
  • Is there a weakness in their argument?
  • Is there a weakness in their evidence?
  • How would you refute them?

Last Week’s Homework

  • Trade Journals and read your partner’s 3rd person story.
  • Did they use only 3rd person? Circle any uses of 1st or 2nd person.
  • Purpose: greater awareness – if you don’t see problems, you can’t fix them.
  • Different versions of the same content
    • Creativity
    • Language/grammar awareness
    • Emphasis

Review - Emphasis: Different Orders

  • He was caught again.
  • Again he was caught.
  • Caught, he was, again. (effective shift/awkward)
  • Therefore, go and spread the word.
  • Go, therefore, and spread the word.

Review - Emphasis: Different Orders

  • Rewrite one of the following sentences to change the emphasis:
  • 1. I suppose you think that the Braves are the best baseball team in the world.
  • 2. No matter how hard you try, there is nothing you can do to change the past.

Emphasis: Parallelism

  • I don’t want to be a tiger, ‘cause tigers play too rough. I don’t want to be a lion, ‘cause lions ain’t the kind you love enough. I just want to be your teddy bear. (Elvis Presley)
  • “The King of Rock & Roll”

Emphasis: Parallelism

  • I came, I saw, I conquered. (Julius Caesar)
  • First Emperor of Rome
  • Commentarii de Bello Gallico (The Gallic Wars)

Emphasis: Parallelism

  • Rewrite one of the following sentences to make them parallel.
  • 1. The musicians began not only to sing, but also dance.
  • 2. I was nervous and frightened, and I hid my emotions. My sister showed the world that she felt confident and carefree.
  • I was nervous and frightened, and I hid my emotions. My sister was confident and carefree, and she showed the world how she felt.

Revising & Editing Sentences

  • Use Parallelism 
  • Use a Consistent Point of View 
  • Use Specific words
  • Use Active Verbs
  • Use Concise Words

Use exact names.

  • Use exact names.
  • Luke fixed the muffler on his car.
  • Luke fixed the muffler on his 2007 Chevrolet Impala.
  • Use lively verbs.
  • The flag moved in the breeze.
  • The flag fluttered in the breeze.
  • Use descriptive words (modifiers) before nouns.
  • A man strained to lift the crate.
  • heavyset, perspiring man strained to lift the heavy wooden crate.
  • Specific Words

The tourists enjoyed a picnic lunch of cheese, bread, and olives.

  • The tourists enjoyed a picnic lunch of cheese, bread, and olives.
  • The tourists enjoyed a picnic lunch of sharp cheese, crusty bread, and spicy olives. (taste)
  • The campers built a fire of pine and cedar.
  • The campers built a fire of aromatic pine and cedar. (smell)
  • A noise told the crowd that there were two minutes left to play.
  • A piercing whistle told the cheering crowd that there were two minutes left to play. (hearing)
  • Neil stroked the kitten's fur until he felt its tiny claws on his hand.
  • Neil stroked the kitten's velvety fur until he felt its tiny, needle-sharp claws on his hand. (touch)
  • Fran placed a sachet in her bureau drawer.
  • Fran placed a lilac-scented sachet in her bureau drawer. (smell)
  • Specific Words: Sense Words—sight, hearing, taste, smell, touch.

When the subject of a sentence performs the action of the verb, the verb is in the active voice. When the subject of a sentence receives the action of a verb, the verb is in the passive voice.

  • When the subject of a sentence performs the action of the verb, the verb is in the active voice. When the subject of a sentence receives the action of a verb, the verb is in the passive voice.
  • Passive voice uses a form of the verb to be (am, is, are, was, were) and the past participle of the main verb (usually the same as its past-tense form). Look at the following active and passive forms.
  • Active Verbs

Passive: The computer was turned on by Hakim.

  • Passive: The computer was turned on by Hakim.
  • Active: Hakim turned on the computer.
  • P: The car's air conditioner was fixed by the mechanic.
  • A: The mechanic fixed the car's air conditioner.
  • P: The stream was diverted by the engineers.
  • A: The engineers diverted the stream.
  • P: The novel A Country Doctor was written by Sarah Orne Jewett.
  • A: Sarah Orne Jewett wrote the novel A Country Doctor.
  • Active Verbs

Passive: In World War II, France, Holland, Norway, Hungary, Poland, Russia, and other countries were invaded by Germany.

  • Passive: In World War II, France, Holland, Norway, Hungary, Poland, Russia, and other countries were invaded by Germany.
  • Active: In World War II, Germany invaded France, Holland, Norway, Hungary, Poland, Russia and other countries.
  • In general, active verbs are more effective than passive verbs. Active verbs give your writing a simpler and more vigorous style.
  • Active Verbs


The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2016
send message

    Main page