Grade 12: Writing Contents



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Grade 12: Writing

Contents

Description of typical tasks (not included in this draft)

Impromptu writing (in-class; first draft)

Quick scale (page 2)

Rating Scale (pages 3-4)

Sample Tasks with exemplars (page 5)



  • Response to prompt, “Our journey into the future begins in the past.” (pp 5-12)

  • Literary response (Brave New World) (pp. 13-21)

Prepared and edited writing (e.g., writer’s workshop)

Quick scale (page 22)

Rating Scale (pages 23-24)

Sample Tasks with exemplars (page 25)



  • Narrative essay (pages 25-38)

Draft: Formative Performance Scale Quick Scale: Grade 12 Impromptu (first draft) writing

This scale is designed for use with first draft writing where students complete the work in a single session, without opportunities to consult with others, receive and use feedback, or prepare a second or third draft. This scale addresses similar qualities to those described in the provincial exam marking scales, but is designed to provide more detailed feedback and formative assessment.






Not yet within expectations

Meets minimal expectations

Fully meets expectations

Exceeds expectations

Snapshot


Unfocused; insufficient material; does not show clear understanding. Language is simplistic and immature with little variety.

Adequate; shows basic understanding with some lapses. Voice is often inconsistent; language is predicable with limited variety.

Logical; shows clear understanding. Easy to read; appropriate voice; language shows variety and control

Insightful; shows some depth of understanding. Clear sense of voice; effective use of language with some sophistication.

Meaning (ideas)

-Thesis; purpose

-Depth; complexity (understanding/insight into the topic or event)

-Development

- Support (use of details, examples)

-Engagement; creative thinking



  • Appropriate thesis or purpose

  • Basic understanding of topic; vague or confused in places

  • Some development; some relevant details/examples

  • Predictable

  • Clear and logical thesis or purpose

  • Clear understanding of topic or event

  • Logically developed Specific, appropriate details and examples

  • Thoughtful

  • Thought-provoking thesis or purpose

  • Some depth and insight

  • Well- developed

  • Highly effective details and examples

  • Engaging

Style

-Voice and tone

-Variety and flow of sentences

-Diction (variety; ‘strength’ and energy of language)




  • Inappropriate voice and tone

  • Repetitive; no sense of control or deliberation

  • Limited vocabulary; repetitive; errors

  • Conversational voice and tone

  • Basic sentence structures; some awkward phrasing

  • Vocabulary lacks variety

  • Appropriate voice and tone; may lapse

  • Sentences generally flow smoothly with some variety

  • Vocabulary is varied and appropriate

  • Voice feels honest and real

  • Shows control of sentence structure; variety

  • Mature vocabulary; some sophistication

Organization and form

-Overall structure (for chosen form)

-Opening/introduction

-Flow; paragraphing; transitions

-Ending/conclusion


  • Structure is weak and may be inappropriate

  • Generally includes an introduction

  • Sequence may be confusing with limited use of transitions

  • no control of paragraphing

  • Ending does not tie up the writing

  • Structure is inconsistent; confusing in places

  • Introduction is often the strongest part

  • Sequence is generally logical; some transitions

  • Some control of paragraphing

  • Weak ending; may be “functional”

  • Overall structure is logical; may be formulaic

  • Engaging introduction

  • Logical sequence with appropriate transitions

  • Appropriate paragraphing

  • Ending ties the writing together

  • Structure is effective for purpose and form

  • Strong opening grabs attention

  • Flows smoothly; uses transitions effectively

  • Effective use of paragraphing

  • Ending has some impact; may offer a with a memorable comment

Conventions

Spelling

-Sentence construction and punctuation; usage (e.g., agreement; tense, form of modifiers, shifts in point-of-view)



  • Frequent, basic errors distract the reader, and often interfere with meaning




  • Several noticeable errors that may be distracting.




  • Some errors; these are not distracting

  • Some usage errors and shifts in point-of-view

  • Few errors; these do not distract the reader.

  • May include some

Draft: Formative Performance Scale Rating Scale: Grade 12 Impromptu (first draft) writing

This scale is designed for use with first draft writing where students complete the work in a single session, without opportunities to consult with others (except very briefly), receive and use feedback, or prepare a second or third draft. This scale addresses similar qualities to those described in the provincial exam marking scales, but is designed to provide more detailed feedback and formative assessment.






Not yet within expectations

Meets minimal expectations

Snapshot


Unfocused; insufficient material; does not show clear understanding. Language is simplistic and immature with little variety.

Adequate; shows basic understanding with some lapses. Voice is often inconsistent; language is predicable with limited variety.

Meaning (ideas)

-Thesis; purpose

-Depth; complexity (understanding/insight into the topic or event)

-Development

- Support (use of details, examples)

-Engagement; creative thinking




  • Unfocused; may appear to have no thesis or clear purpose

  • Does not show clear understanding of the topic

  • Insufficient relevant material (may list loosely related information)

  • Limited and poorly chosen details and examples

  • Often confusing and hard to follow

  • Addresses an appropriate thesis or purpose

  • Shows some basic understanding of the topic or event; may be vague or confused in places

  • Some development; may not fully address the prompt

  • Some relevant details/examples

  • Predictable

Style

-Voice and tone

-Variety and flow of sentences

-Diction (variety; ‘strength’ and energy of language)




  • Inappropriate voice and tone

  • Repetitive; no sense of control or deliberation

  • Limited vocabulary; repetitive; may misuse words and expressions




  • Voice and tone are usually conversational

  • Relies on basic sentence structures; some awkward phrasing

  • Vocabulary is generally appropriate, but lacks variety

Organization and form

-Overall structure (for chosen form)

-Opening/introduction

-Flow; paragraphing; transitions

-Ending/conclusion



  • Structure is weak and may be inappropriate for purpose and form

  • Generally includes an introduction

  • Sequence may be confusing with limited use of transitions

  • Little control of paragraphing (may be written as one paragraph)

  • May include an explicit ending, but it does not tie up the writing or help to accomplish the purpose

  • Overall structure is inconsistent; confusing in places

  • Includes an introduction; this is often the strongest part of the writing

  • Sequence is generally logical, but may lapse in places; some appropriate use of basic transitions

  • Some control of paragraphing

  • Includes a weak ending or conclusion that is “functional”

Conventions

Spelling

-Sentence construction and punctuation



-Usage (e.g., agreement; tense, form of modifiers, shifts in point-of-view)

  • Frequent, basic errors in spelling and sentences distract the reader, and often interfere with meaning.

  • Frequent, significant usage errors, including pronoun references and verbs (form and agreement)

  • Several noticeable errors in spelling and sentences that may be distracting.

  • Noticeable usage errors that may be distracting, often involving pronoun references, verbs, and point-of-view



Fully meets expectations

Exceeds expectations

Logical; shows clear understanding. Easy to read; appropriate voice; language shows variety and control

Insightful; shows some depth of understanding. Clear sense of voice; effective use of language with some sophistication.

  • Focused on a clear and logical thesis or purpose

  • Shows clear understanding of topic or event

  • Logically developed with explanation and analysis

  • Specific, appropriate details and examples

  • Thoughtful

  • Focused on a thought-provoking thesis or purpose

  • Shows some depth of understanding; insightful

  • Well- developed, in a natural and engaging way

  • Concrete, highly effective details and examples

  • Engaging; writer appears aware of audience




  • Appropriate voice and tone; may lapse

  • Sentences generally flow smoothly with some variety

  • Vocabulary is varied and appropriate and often specific in places




  • Voice feels honest and real

  • Shows control of sentence structure; varies length and pattern effectively

  • Mature vocabulary with some sophisticated use of language




  • Overall structure is logical; may be formulaic

  • Engaging introduction

  • Logical sequence with appropriate transitions and paragraphing

  • Ending ties the writing together

  • Structure is effective for purpose and form; may be innovative in places.

  • Strong opening grabs attention

  • Flows smoothly; uses transitions and paragraphing effectively; may deliberately create anticipation or suspense

  • Ending has some impact; may offer a with a memorable comment



  • Some errors in spelling and sentences but these are not distracting

  • Some usage errors and shifts in point-of-view

  • Few errors in sentence structure or spelling; these do not distract the reader.

  • May include some usage errors, and shifts in point-of-view; these generally occur only in complex language and longer sentences




Grade 12 Sample Impromptu writing

  1. Sample Writing Task: In-class prompt

Context

Students in this class wrote regularly in response to a variety of prompts. They explored various ways of shaping and developing a topic, including narrative and argumentative essays. The teacher frequently provided mini-lessons on specific aspects of writing, practice activities, and involved students in developing criteria they used for self- and peer-assessment. At regular intervals, students submitted their writing for teacher feedback.



Process

Students responded to the prompt, “Our journey into the future begins in the past” within a 70-minute class period, and submitted their essay for teacher assessment and feedback.

They used computers to write their drafts, and were encouraged to edit and revise within the class period. They did not receive teacher or peer feedback on their drafts.




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