Germany, Belgium and Denmark



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Germany, Belgium and Denmark

Sweden

Armenia
ost of the countries that have many tennis players are in the northern hemisphere and tend to be the rich countries.


Russia




Canada

GBR

Italy, Switzerland, Slovakia, Romania, Czech Rep., Croatia, Belarus, the Netherlands

France


China

USA


India


Morocco

Spain

Ecuador


Indonesia


Brazil

Zimbabwe

Australia

Paraguay


South Africa

Argentina




Note there are no players from Canada, India, Indonesia and Japan even though they are coloured white. India and Indonesia are very poor countries. The sport obviously hasn’t caught on in Japan and Canada. A lot of Canada is probably too cold to play tennis or any other similar sport.

No. of top 99 male tennis players:



The yellow circle shows the sub cluster in the south of Africa. There are no players from central Africa because the countries are too poor, the climate is too hot and sport didn’t reach Africa for a while. However many top long-distance runners come from Africa, so you might expect there to be one or two tennis players with good stamina.

Green countries are unimportant countries that have no players.




The red line shows the economic north (above line) and the economic south (below line). Almost all the players (c. 80%) come from MEDC countries above the line. The two people from the south of Africa both have English / American names.



Pink circles show the main clusters – Europe, North and South America. It puzzles me a little why there are many players from South America, because all their GDP per capitas are less than $10,000 apart from Argentina, which isn’t much higher (see table further down). Countries with less money generally don’t have the money to build the right facilities and most people have more important things to do than sport i.e. get enough food to survive. Perhaps it is because of advertising in these countries or that the people living there (this time the players seem to have `indigenous` names) are, as such, `made for the sport` - they are physically fit in `all the right places`.

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I would describe the spread as uneven, clustered, and as expected! Not just uneven over the whole world, but uneven in many continents too. Players in Africa are either in the far north area or the far south. Those who come from Europe tend to come from the west rather than the east.



No.

of players

GDP per capita

This bubble graph shows number of players against population against GDP per capita. The population of each country is shown by the size of the bubble. You would expect population to have some effect on the number of male tennis players in the top 99 – the more people a country has in it the more likely one of them will be a top tennis player - but looking at this there is no definite correlation (trend). The larger bubbles should be nearer the top of the graph. Thus graph is perhaps not the best way of showing the data, so I have included a table further down.


The line is the line of best fit and it does go in the expected direction but even still the correlation between players and GDP per capita is not exactly `staring you in the face`.
Why do places like china have some players?

Although China is the most populated country in the world, generally you don’t find many people from there who are good at European sports, like golf. The reason that there are a few good tennis players from there is that it used to be a strict communist country. When this `calmed down` many people took up swimming, tennis and athletics. The reason there aren’t many more people coming from there is that before 25 years ago China was cut off from the rest of the world and has had only a few years to start `joining in` again. One thing that shows China is beginning to get into the world of sport more is that Olympics 2008 will be held there in Beijing.


Why does Spain have so many players? Perhaps many of them are foreigners from nearby countries like Britain? Read the paragraph about the top ten male tennis players table.
The USA has unsurprisingly quite a few players. This is mainly because people are generally rich enough to have some leisure time and improve their skills rather than have to work constantly, and that the country is very rich and therefore can build sports facilities. But it is also because of advertising. In Britain, for example, you may have seen the advert on the television at the end of summer 2002, where Tim Henman promotes a type of washing powder.
T
Notice Spain doesn’t get a look in here. There is a chance that they have a lot of players in the top 99 because they have lots of courts, but I don’t think they do. But lots of courts don’t necessarily make good players. That’s why there aren’t any Spaniards in the top 10.

Clearly USA has the advantage here.


op ten male tennis players:

Country

Number

USA

3

Australia

2

Russia

2

Brazil

1

Ecuador

1

Germany

1






Country

N
This is a more up to date version of the Men’s tennis association rankings. The players at the top are those with the most points. It has changed a lot from the previous table – obviously in the world of tennis, rankings tend not to stay the same. This suggests that countries that perhaps don’t get the best start can always make an effort to do well.
umber


USA

2

Australia

0

Russia

1

Brazil

0

Ecuador

0

Germany

1

GBR

1

Spain

3

Switzerland

1
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