From start to finish March 13, 2012



Download 21,05 Kb.
Date conversion02.11.2016
Size21,05 Kb.

March 13, 2012

  • March 13, 2012
  • Anyone registered as a Sophomore must test.
  • 100 minutes
  • No dictionary nor thesaurus
  • Teacher may read prompt twice only
  • Teacher cannot help read, spell, or give further directions.
  • No talking, sharing papers, telling each other what to do (ideas), disturbing the class

Teacher will read the whole prompt twice.

  • Teacher will read the whole prompt twice.
  • Before you begin, read the prompt again and analyze it.
  • Find the PAC (Purpose, Audience, Context)

Purpose – What am I writing?

  • Purpose – What am I writing?
  • Audience – Who am I writing it to?
  • Context – What kind of a format do they want?

Context comes in four tested formats

  • Context comes in four tested formats
  • Speech – Must include opener addressing audience
  • Article – Journalistic writing
  • Letter – Must include greeting/salutation and closing
  • Essay – Normal paper

Purpose – What am I writing?

  • Purpose – What am I writing?
  • Audience – Who am I writing it to?
  • Context – What kind of a format do they want?

Purpose – What am I writing?

  • Purpose – What am I writing?
  • Audience – Who am I writing it to?
  • Context – What kind of a format do they want?

Purpose – What am I writing?

  • Purpose – What am I writing?
  • Audience – Who am I writing it to?
  • Context – What kind of a format do they want?
  • SALE

FOSSE-C

  • FOSSE-C

Focus is the topic/subject established by the writer in response to the writing task. The writer must clearly establish a focus as he/she fulfills the assignment of the prompt. If the writer retreats from the subject matter presented in the prompt or addresses it too broadly, the focus is weakened. The writer may effectively use an inductive organizational plan, which does not actually identify the subject matter at the beginning and may not literally identify the subject matter at all. The presence, therefore, of a focus must be determined in light of the method of development chosen by the writer.

  • Focus is the topic/subject established by the writer in response to the writing task. The writer must clearly establish a focus as he/she fulfills the assignment of the prompt. If the writer retreats from the subject matter presented in the prompt or addresses it too broadly, the focus is weakened. The writer may effectively use an inductive organizational plan, which does not actually identify the subject matter at the beginning and may not literally identify the subject matter at all. The presence, therefore, of a focus must be determined in light of the method of development chosen by the writer.
  • • If the reader is confused about the subject matter, the writer has not effectively established a focus.
  • • If the reader is engaged and not confused, the writer probably has been effective in establishing a focus.

Organization is the progression, relatedness, and completeness of ideas. The writer establishes for the reader a well-organized composition, which exhibits a constancy of purpose through the development of elements forming an effective beginning, middle, and end.

  • Organization is the progression, relatedness, and completeness of ideas. The writer establishes for the reader a well-organized composition, which exhibits a constancy of purpose through the development of elements forming an effective beginning, middle, and end.
  • • The writer establishes relationships between and among ideas and/or events throughout the response.
  • • The response demonstrates a clear progression of related ideas and/or events and is unified and complete.

Style is the control of language that is appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context of the writing task. The writer's style is evident through word choice and sentence fluency.

  • Style is the control of language that is appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context of the writing task. The writer's style is evident through word choice and sentence fluency.
  • Skillful use of precise, purposeful vocabulary enhances the effectiveness of the composition through the use of appropriate words, phrases and descriptions that engage the audience.
  • • Sentence fluency involves using a variety of sentence styles to establish effective relationships between and among ideas, causes, and/or statements appropriate to the task.

Support and Elaboration is the extension and development of the topic/subject. The writer provides sufficient elaboration to present the ideas and/or events clearly. Two important concepts in determining whether details are supportive are relatedness and sufficiency.

  • Support and Elaboration is the extension and development of the topic/subject. The writer provides sufficient elaboration to present the ideas and/or events clearly. Two important concepts in determining whether details are supportive are relatedness and sufficiency.
  • Relatedness: To be supportive of the subject matter, details must be related to the focus of the response. Relatedness has to do with the directness of the relationship that the writer establishes between the support and elaboration and the topic/subject.
  • Supporting details should be relevant and clear. Effective use of concrete, specific details strengthens the response.
  • Sufficiency: Undeveloped details, redundancy, and the repetitious paraphrasing of the same point often characterize insufficiency. Sufficiency has less to do with the amount and more to do with the specificity and effectiveness of the support and elaboration provided. The writer must present his or her ideas with enough power and clarity to cause the support to be sufficient.

Conventions involve correctness in sentence formation, usage, and mechanics. The writer has control of grammatical conventions that are appropriate to the writing task. Errors, if present, do not impede the reader's understanding of the ideas conveyed.

  • Conventions involve correctness in sentence formation, usage, and mechanics. The writer has control of grammatical conventions that are appropriate to the writing task. Errors, if present, do not impede the reader's understanding of the ideas conveyed.
  • • Sentence Formation is the complete expression of an assertion, explanation, proposal, question, or command.
  • • Standard usage includes agreement, tense, and case.
  • • Mechanics involve the use of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.

Using your own experiences, history, and/or readings, write an article for your school paper about the meaning of heroism.

  • Using your own experiences, history, and/or readings, write an article for your school paper about the meaning of heroism.
  • We do this for EVERY prompt from now on!

Topic

  • Topic
  • Brainstorm Ideas

Heroism

  • Heroism
  • Bravery
  • Courage
  • Unselfish
  • Fill and choose 3

Intro

  • Intro
  • Body 1
  • Body 2
  • Body 3
  • Conclusion

Vigilantes beware! Red Springs Police Department continues to crack down on miscreants that persist to vandalize the high school gym. The police, hearing rumors that more ruckuses are to come, have decided to define heroism. I define heroism as bravery, courage, and unselfishness.

  • Vigilantes beware! Red Springs Police Department continues to crack down on miscreants that persist to vandalize the high school gym. The police, hearing rumors that more ruckuses are to come, have decided to define heroism. I define heroism as bravery, courage, and unselfishness.
  • To begin with, heroism is bravery.
  • Moreover, heroism is courage.
  • Paramount, heroism is being unselfish.
  • In retrospect, the Red Springs Police Department needs to see more heroes in the community. Heroism is bravery, courage, and being unselfish. Without a doubt, this is heroism.
  • Gilgamesh
  • Noah
  • Lamar
  • Roosevelt quote
  • Myself

Hook

  • Hook
  • Topic / Thesis
  • 3 reasons / definitions
  • Leads are the first two or three sentences or twenty seconds in any piece of discourse.
  • A good lead will begin with a “hook” to pull your reader into the writing.

Rhetorical questions: What do you do with a million dollars?

  • Rhetorical questions: What do you do with a million dollars?
  • Phrases Like:
  • When I was six…
  • I am going to tell you a story about…
  • I’ll never forget the time…
  • One day…
  • Once upon a time…

For our purposes, we are going to focus on four types of leads:

  • For our purposes, we are going to focus on four types of leads:
  • Action
  • Characterization
  • Dialogue
  • Setting
  • (There are others, but these will get us started)

Something is happening

  • Something is happening
  • The action may be subtle or intense depending on the situation.
  • The Mole had been working very hard all the
  • morning, spring cleaning his little home. First
  • with brooms, then with dusters; then on ladders
  • and steps and chairs, with a brush and a pail of
  • whitewash; till he had dust in his throat and
  • eyes, and splashes of whitewash all over his
  • black fur, and an aching back and weary arms.
  • From Kenneth Grahame’s classic The Wind in the Willows.

The two men appeared out of nowhere, a

  • The two men appeared out of nowhere, a
  • few yards apart in the narrow, moonlit lane.
  • For a second they stood quite still, wands
  • directed at each other’s chests; then,
  • recognizing each other, they stowed their
  • wands beneath their cloaks and started
  • walking briskly in the same direction.

Definition: the repetition of coordinate conjunctions between words, phrases, and clauses.

  • Definition: the repetition of coordinate conjunctions between words, phrases, and clauses.
  • …then on ladders and steps and chairs, with a brush and a pail…
  • Notice the effect the use of polysyndeton has on the sentence.
  • Since the Mole had been working very hard all day, this creates a sense of breathlessness.

This lead begins by using sensory details to describe a character and/or characters. These details allow us to get a clear picture of the character(s).

  • This lead begins by using sensory details to describe a character and/or characters. These details allow us to get a clear picture of the character(s).
  • Many times the characterization allows us insight
  • into the character’s personality or status.
  • Sometimes we are also allowed a glimpse into the character(s) thinking and thought processes.
  • My name is India Opal Buloni, and last summer my daddy, the preacher, sent me to the store for a box of macaroni-and-cheese, some white rice, and two tomatoes and I came back with a dog. This is what happened:…
  • from Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo

The Empire Grill was long and low-slung, with windows that ran its

  • The Empire Grill was long and low-slung, with windows that ran its
  • entire length, and since the building next door, a Rexall drugstore, had
  • been condemned and razed, it was now possible to sit at the lunch
  • counter and see straight down Empire Avenue all the way to the old
  • textile mill and its adjacent shirt factory. Both had been abandoned now
  • for the better part of two decades, though their dark, looming shapes at
  • the foot of the avenue’s gentle incline continued to draw the eye. Of
  • course, nothing prevented a person from looking up Empire Avenue in
  • the other direction, but Miles Roby, the proprietor of the restaurant –
  • and eventual owner, he hoped – had long noted that his customers rarely
  • did.

Someone is speaking

  • Someone is speaking
  • The use of quotation marks signals this category.
  • Note: Character’s thoughts (internal dialogue) does not go in quotation marks. In printing of books, the thoughts are often put in italics

“Tony,” Lincoln Mendoza whispered into

  • “Tony,” Lincoln Mendoza whispered into
  • the telephone. “It’s your buddy, Linc.”
  • “Linc? My homeboy moved to the good
  • side of town,” Tony Contreras answered
  • sleepily.

“Tom!”

  • “Tom!”
  • No answer.
  • “Tom!”
  • No answer.
  • “What’s gone with that boy, I wonder? You
  • TOM!”
  • No answer.

Setting is time and place, and for the more sophisticated reader, the state of mind of the character – mindset becomes the setting.

  • Setting is time and place, and for the more sophisticated reader, the state of mind of the character – mindset becomes the setting.
  • This lead sometimes surfaces as a character’s thinking
  • A character may be thinking about what already happened.

Many years later, as he faced the firing squad,

  • Many years later, as he faced the firing squad,
  • Colonel Aureliano Buendia was to remember that
  • distant afternoon when his father took him to
  • discover ice. At that time Macondo was a village
  • of twenty adobe houses, built on the bank of a
  • river of clear water that ran along a bed of polished
  • stones, which were white and enormous, like
  • prehistoric eggs.

It was 7 minutes after midnight. The dog was lying on the grass

    • It was 7 minutes after midnight. The dog was lying on the grass
    • in the middle of the lawn in front of Mrs. Shears’s house. Its eyes
    • were closed. It looked as if it was running on its side, the way dogs
    • run when they think they are chasing a cat in a dream. But the dog
    • was not running or asleep. The dog was dead. There was a
    • garden fork sticking out of the dog. The points of the fork must
    • have gone all the way through the dog and into the ground because
    • the fork had not fallen over. I decided that the dog was probably
    • killed with the fork because I could not see any other wounds in the
    • dog and I do not think you would stick a garden fork into a dog
    • after it had died for some other reason, like cancer, for example, or
    • a road accident. But I could not be certain about this.

Thesis Statement PowerPoint

  • Thesis Statement PowerPoint

Write a sentence for each of your three topics you chose to write about.

  • Write a sentence for each of your three topics you chose to write about.

Transition: In other words, What I mean is, To define further,

  • Transition: In other words, What I mean is, To define further,

Transition: For example, An example is,

  • Transition: For example, An example is,
  • Make sure to use Literary, Historical, and Personal Observations or Experiences

Transition Word: Furthermore, Moreover, Additionally,

  • Transition Word: Furthermore, Moreover, Additionally,

Transition: In other words, What I mean is, To define further,

  • Transition: In other words, What I mean is, To define further,

Transition: For example, An example is,

  • Transition: For example, An example is,
  • Make sure to use Literary, Historical, and Personal Observations or Experiences

Transition Word: Furthermore, Moreover, Additionally, Paramount, Most significant

  • Transition Word: Furthermore, Moreover, Additionally, Paramount, Most significant

Transition: In other words, What I mean is, To define further,

  • Transition: In other words, What I mean is, To define further,

Transition: For example, An example is,

  • Transition: For example, An example is,
  • Make sure to use Literary, Historical, and Personal Observations or Experiences

Transition Word: In summation, In retrospect

  • Transition Word: In summation, In retrospect

Restate the 3 reasons you gave for your topic

  • Restate the 3 reasons you gave for your topic

Transition: Unquestionably, Without a doubt, Absolutely, Positively, Indeed

  • Transition: Unquestionably, Without a doubt, Absolutely, Positively, Indeed

Essay

  • Essay


The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2016
send message

    Main page