Friday, Nov. 9th 7: 30 am Book fair set-up/Registration open



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Conference Schedule

Thursday, Nov. 8th

6:00 pm Early Registration



Flagler Room, Ponce Hall
7:30 pm Evening Reading: Florida Book Award Winners

Flagler Room, Ponce Hall

Stephen Kampa and Enid Shomer



Friday, Nov. 9th

7:30 am Book fair set-up/Registration open

Coffee and donut table

Ringhaver Student Center
8:30 am Greetings/Welcome

Book Fair

8:30 am-Dusk Write St. Augustine



Flagler College Campus and the City of St. Augustine

Slash Pine Press and FLARE: The Flagler Review


Explore Florida's oldest city and enjoy St. Augustine's unique combination of spaces and places. Follow in the footsteps of literary legends Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Marjorie Kennan Rawlings. Write your way from Flagler College to Matanzas Bay. Paired with specific destinations on your journey, creative writing exercises will prompt you to take a different approach to tourism. A two-day event, your Write St. Augustine experience will start with the packet found at the registration table at Flagler College and continue at your leisure. Work generated while touring the town will be collected and published online (with permission).  

8:45-10:00 am Dark Journeys: Mapmaking and Mythmaking in Speculative Fiction



Virginia Room 234, Student Center

Brogan Sullivan, Alan Shaw, Riley Passmore


Speculative fiction, more than any other genre, relies on the idea of the journey. The trek may be physical or spiritual, but in nearly every case, the work of speculative fiction takes the reader through landscapes that are both distinctly novel and disturbingly familiar. Furthermore, no other genre invites its readers to build upon these landscapes as often or as comprehensively. Science fiction, fantasy, and horror call us not only to take the journey, but also to inhabit the territories our favorite authors create for us through their mythmaking.
Mania, Fear, and the New ‘Flâneur’

Virginia Room 235, Student Center

Kyle McKinney, Matthew Epperson, Ryan Bollenbach


This panel is interested in wandering narrators deeply invested in their personal experiences and encounters. We seek the manic flaneur: off the wall, paranoid, tripped out--those whose perspective allows a fresh look into small details and strange encounters. We wish to explore the wide-eyed witness, the babbling disaster survivor, the wanderer still clutching his bleeding hand after the bar fight. We believe this is the kind of narrator who has the power to sanctify that which is
utterly singular, and beguile the reader with the hyper-specific.

Editor’s Roundtable

Gamache Koger Theater, Student Center

Jocelyn Bartkevicius, Richard Mathews, Richard Peabody, Michael Trammell, Dan Veach, Bob Kunzinger


Writing, travel, submissions, decisions, and more—from the editor's perspective.

10:15-11:30 am The Journeys We Take



Virginia Room 234, Student Center

Anne Wood Fuller, Linda Dennard, Barbara Wiedemann


Sometimes a journey into the heart can be just as revealing as a journey into the unknown, and sometimes a journey into the unknown is a journey into the heart. Participants will read original work.

Alternatives to the MFA

Virginia Room 235, Student Center

Sohrab Homi Fracis, Stephen Kampa, Liz Robbins, Laura Lee Smith


An MFA is a solid route to a writing career, but it’s not the only route. A panel of publishing poets and writers discuss their different paths and explore ways to gain education and experience outside the workshop setting.
Sponsored Reading: YellowJacket Press

Gamache Koger Theater, Student Center

11:45-1:00 pm Fiction Workshop: Reading Like a Writer

(Registration fee required)

Virginia Room 234, Student Center

Mark Powell


This workshop will use a number of passages to examine what we can learn from published writers.

Non-Fiction Workshop: Everything I Write is True, But This Actually Happened

(Registration fee required)



Virginia Room 235, Student Center

Bob Kunzinger


A workshop where we mix the reality of an event and the digression of what is and isn't true.
Poetry Workshop: Image/Image: Poetry and Visual Art

(Registration fee required)



Crisp Ellert Art Museum

Terri Witek


Poets will generate new work in Flagler College's Crisp-Ellert Museum (next door to the main conference building). Friday and Saturday workshops will be different experiences: each will feature separate poetry challenges, some suggested by workshop participants. Visual artists and photographers also welcome.

1:15-2:30 pm Journey Poetry



Virginia Room 235, Student Center

Rachel Fogarty-Oleson, Sandra Chávez Johnson, Michele Randall


This panel will address three main avenues of journey poems and/or journey poetry: the journey out (a journey via the poems of a foreign country); the journey home (poetry through a bicultural lens); and the journey-less (how poets can create the environment of another location/place without having actually been there).

Lust and Wander

Virginia Room 235, Student Center

Jan Beatty, Celeste Gainey, Aaron Smith


How do we write poems that capture the places that speak to us? Three poets from East to West coast will read poems of place and speak of their personal iconography of movement. What determines which latitudes will engage the body in its drive to wander? What are the crossroads of desire and geography, and how do these crossroads find their way to the page?

Sponsored Reading: Eckerd Review

Gamache Koger Theater, Student Center

Scott Ward, Jon Chopan, Helen Wallace

2:30-3:45 pm Women on the Road: Their Lives and Travel

Virginia Room 234, Student Center

Linda Buckmaster, Jane Varley, Ruth Moon Kempher, Melanie Neale


We'll take a quick literary journey of women writers on the road from intrepid Victorian ladies to women of the Beat generation to contemporary wanderers. Where does their writing fit into the general travel literary scene of their day? What has stayed the same and what has changed?
The Art of Travel

Virginia Room 235, Student Center

Sean Sexton, Michael Kemp, Carol Lynne Knight, Lawrence Hetrick, Patricia Waters


This panel will discuss the influences of travel upon their writing, art, and associations with one another. Of these Poets, Writers and Artists, each has combined different disciplines in their creative endeavors, traveled and connected with one another through correspondence, collaboration, and artistic contributions to handmade books circulating among them for the last four years. Presenting a discussion annually at the conference of how this friendship has affected their creativity has become in itself something this group has chosen to do together.

Sponsored Reading: Tampa Review Editors

Gamache Koger Theater, Student Center

Audrey Colombe, Erica Dawson, Richard Mathews, Libba Winston

4:00-5:15 pm Other Words Creative Writing Faculty Reading

Gamache Koger Theater, Student Center

Mark Powell, Terri Witek, Bob Kunzinger

5:30 pm Book Fair and Registration Closes for the Evening

6:00 pm Reception



Markland House

8:00 pm Other Words Festival Renga Reading



Flagler Room, Ponce Hall
Everyone who wants to can read something, but the piece (poetry or prose) should last no longer than a minute. If possible, stay within the broad conference theme of Wanderlust.

Saturday, Nov. 10th

7:30 am Book Fair Set-up/Registration Opens

Coffee and donut table

Ringhaver Student Center
8:00-8:45 am FLAC Membership Meeting

Gamache Koger Theater, Student Center
On the agenda: Discussion of an upcoming election for FLAC officers and a slate of those running.  We will discuss the opportunities (and need!) for people to get involved with conference planning, grant writing, fundraising, the writers circuit, and other projects.  We hope that interested and dedicated folks will come, lured by the aromas of coffee and donuts! 
8:30 am-Dusk Write St. Augustine

Flagler College Campus and the City of St. Augustine

Slash Pine Press and FLARE: The Flagler Review


Explore Florida's oldest city and enjoy St. Augustine's unique combination of spaces and places. Follow in the footsteps of literary legends Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Marjorie Kennan Rawlings. Write your way from Flagler College to Matanzas Bay. Paired with specific destinations on your journey, creative writing exercises will prompt you to take a different approach to tourism. A two-day event, your Write St. Augustine experience will start with the packet found at the registration table at Flagler College and continue at your leisure. Work generated while touring the town will be collected and published online (with permission).  

8:45-10:00 am Home Sweet Home: How Region Influences Fiction



Gamache Koger Theater, Student Center

Zachary Lundgren, Ryan Cheng, Gloria Munoz, Matt Epperson


From the Beat poets of San Francisco, to Faulkner’s depiction of the Southern gothic, to Cormac McCarthy’s harsh and brutally gorgeous southwest, American literature is truly an amalgamation of unique and individual voices, representative not only of the self, but also of the regions where each writer calls home. This panel hosts a selection of writers, each hailing from and inspired by a unique region of the United States, who will discuss how their various regions have influenced and instigated their own writing, in both style and content. As disparate as our writing may seem, there are still strings, no matter how thin or translucent, that keep us connected, and in this panel, we will attempt to shine a little light on this spider web of American prose and poetry.

Journeying Through the Fallow Mind: Transcending Writer’s Block at the Desk and in the Classroom

Virginia Room 234, Student Center

Laura Valeri, Emma Bolden, Jared Yates Sexton


Citing works from writers, psychoanalysts, social scientists, and neuroscientists, this panel will explore the startling science behind creativity and writers block, showcase helpful pedagogies that enhance students’ creative flow, and discuss strategies for overcoming various forms of resistance common with writers at all stages of their career.
Creating Strong Female Characters in Science Fiction

Virginia Room 235, Student Center

Chris Berman


For too long these roles have been predominantly the province of males. Strong women characters can be drawn from historical accounts of the women combat pilots of the Red Air Force in WW2. Drawing from reality makes for convincing fictional protagonists.
Chapbook Stitching Workshop

(Limited to 12 participants)



Crisp Ellert Art Museum

Lucas Southworth, Patti White, Amber Brown, Laura Flowers, Will Gillette, Debra Logan, Judah Martin, Carlos Estrada


Interns from Slash Pine Press will lead a chapbook-stitching workshop. Participants will learn to fold and punch books and will also learn to stitch a chapbook. All materials will be provided. After completing the stitch, participants will leave with their own newly-stitched chapbook from Slash Pine Press.

10:15-11:30 am Imaginative Travel: Persona Poems and Alternative Voices



Virginia Room 234, Student Center

Lisa Zimmerman, Gaylord Brewer, Tania Rochelle, Marty Williams


In this panel, we'll explore crafting persona poems as a means to integrate culture, claim place, and avoid the superficiality of "tourist" poetry. We’ll discuss how to be successfully hijacked by another voice whether from reading fairy tales or historical texts, sitting on an airplane outside of Detroit, or walking through a museum of farm machinery. We'll talk specifics and share a few examples.

Retreat but Not Surrender: Getting Away to Write

Virginia Room 235, Student Center

Carol Frost, Richard Frost, Susan Lilley, Ilyse Kusnetz


Thoreau went to the woods. Henry James preferred the “grand tour” of Europe. Annie Dillard recreated nature’s beauty in a metal shed in her backyard, and Shelley wrote fiery poetry about England while chilling out in Italy. Female Victorian novelists were known to take refuge in their beds, metaphorical ships that sailed off the coast of daily family life. As veterans of all kinds of writing retreats, from formally protected artist colonies to make-your-own sojourns and holed-up hideaways, panelists will discuss the enduring challenge of finding times and places for doing the work of writing. Topics will include both the practical and esoteric issues involved in the concept of retreat. Sharing of experiences and ideas welcome.

47% Fiction Reading: College of Central Florida

Gamache Koger Theater, Student Center

Ron Cooper, Michael Gills, Eric Miles Williamson

11:45 am-1:00 pm Screen Workshop: Fiction from the Bottom to the Top

(Registration fee required)



Virginia Room 234, Student Center

Jeff Bens


This workshop will look at effective ways to write for the screen. We'll watch film clips, study scenes from celebrated screenplays and complete exercises to help get at how to make stories and characters believable, enjoyable and compelling. For all levels of writers.

Non-Fiction Workshop: Exploring the Malleability of the Essay Form

(Registration fee required)



Virginia Room 235, Student Center

Ira Sukrungruang


This seminar is dedicated to the amebic nature of the essay form. We will evaluate alternative ways of structuring an essay, create our own structures, and discuss how the essay form is a blueprint of our brains. We will also examine how an essayist creates order out of disorder and the close relationship the essay has to poetry.
Poetry Workshop: Image/Image: Poetry and Visual Art

(Registration fee required)



Crisp Ellert Art Museum

Terri Witek


Poets will generate new work in Flagler College's Crisp-Ellert Museum (next door to the main conference building). Friday and Saturday workshops will be different experiences: each will feature separate poetry challenges, some suggested by workshop participants. Visual artists and photographers also welcome.
Fiction Workshop: Reading Like a Writer

(Registration fee required)



Room 214, Student Center

Mark Powell


This workshop will use a number of passages to examine what we can learn from published writers.

1:15-2:30 pm The Poetics of Travel



Virginia Room 234, Student Center

Glenn Freeman, Lucas Southworth, Patricia Waters, Patti White


Poets and fiction writers will interweave creative work with insights on the relation of travel/place/liminal spaces to their creative process and the situating of voice.

Your Book Just Came Out. Now What?

Virginia Room 235, Student Center

Enid Shomer, Rhonda Riley, Ira Sukrungruang, Rosalynde Vas Dias,

Mary Jane Ryals

What happens after your book is accepted? Panelists will discuss their post-acceptance experiences (with a variety of presses), including the editorial process and revisions, book production, illustrations, cover art, galleys, publisher warehouses, independent bookstores, and readings.


Sponsored Reading: Atlanta Review

Gamache Koger Theater, Student Center

Dan Veach, Travis Wayne Denton, Ilyse Kusnetz, Gaylord Brewer

2:45-4:00 pm Culture Shock: The Writer Abroad

Virginia Room 234, Student Center

Christine M. Lasek, Katherine Riegel, Jenni Nance, Gloria Muñoz


We are the sum of our surroundings. In defining ourselves, it is impossible to escape our clothing, our customs, who our friends are and our language--that is, until we travel abroad. In foreign countries, these skins of culture, custom and language are peeled away. Surrounded by people that dress differently than us, eat different foods, and wear different clothing, we are faced with the prospect of truly understanding ourselves at our core. This is what it means to experience culture shock. This panel will explore this concept of “culture shock”-- terrifying, confusing, frustrating (especially for a writer faced with a language barrier), but also freeing. Even when not the subjects of memoirs, these experiences abroad can and do seep into the prose and poetry of writers. Each panel member will discuss their own journeys and their aftereffects.

To Move or Stay Put: The Importance of Place in Poems

Virginia Room 234, Student Center

Katie Chaple, Travis Wayne Denton, Nick Norwood


No Matter Where You Go, There You Are. It’s impossible to overestimate the importance of place in poetry, whether the place in question is one the poet has been desperately hoping to escape or one the poet never wants to leave—literally figuratively, or both. The panelists will examine the importance of place in poems—their own as well as in the work of others, focusing on how place both informs and influences content and craft.
Sponsored Reading: Anhinga Press

Gamache Koger Theater, Student Center

Rosalynde Vas Dias, Ken Hart, Lola Haskins

4:00-5:15 pm Other Words Faculty Reading

Gamache Koger Theater, Student Center

Jeff Bens, Ira Sukrungruang

5:30 pm Book Fair and Registration closes

8:00 pm Evening Reading



Flagler Room, Ponce Hall

Kelle Groom and Bob Shacochis



Sunday, Nov. 11th
11:00 am-3:00 pm Advanced Fiction Workshop: Getting It On the Page

(Registration fee required)



Virginia Room 234, Student Center

Mark Powell


This workshop will focus on the process of moving from an initial idea to a solid (if not final) draft. We will examine a number of passages by published writers.
Advanced Non-Fiction Workshop: Balancing Scene and Exposition

(Registration fee required)



Virginia Room 235, Student Center

Ira Sukrungruang


In this workshop session writers will explore the nature and balance of scene and exposition in their nonfiction and investigate other structures besides chronology. Though scene is used in fiction, how one approaches scene and dialogue is different when dealing with real life events. Students will write and share their work with the workshop group.
Advanced Poetry Workshop: Site-Specific St. Augustine

(Registration fee required)



Crisp Ellert Art Museum

Terri Witek


After an introductory exercise, Sunday poets will become flaneurs and flaneuses, wandering the city with a series of prompts designed to generate new work. Intervals inside and out, with a rain plan.

Other Words Conference Participants
Jocelyn Bartkevicius is editor of The Florida Review and director of the MFA Program in creative writing at the University of Central Florida. Her work has appeared in such journals as The Missouri Review, Fourth Genre, Gulf Coast, The Hudson Review, and has received the Annie Dillard Award in the Essay and other prizes.
Jan Beatty is the author of The Switching Yard, Red Sugar, Boneshaker, and Mad River, winner of the 1994 Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize, published by the University of Pittsburgh Press. She hosts and produces Prosody, a public radio show on NPR affiliate 90.5-FM featuring the work of national writers. Beatty worked as a welfare caseworker, an abortion counselor, in maximum security prisons, and as a waitress for fifteen years. She directs the creative writing program at Carlow University, where she runs the Madwomen in the Attic Writing Workshops and teaches in the MFA program.
Jeff Bens directs the undergraduate creative writing program at Manhattanville College. He is author of the novel Albert, Himself and director of the documentary film, Fatman's. His short fiction and essays are published widely. Jeff has served on film festival juries around the world including the 2011 Slamdance feature film jury. He was a founding faculty of the School of Filmmaking at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts.
Chris Berman grew up indulging in the reading of science fiction books and while recuperating after a bicycle accident, gained an opportunity to create one of his own. His first novel, The Hive, was released in 2009, followed by Red Moon (2010) and Star Pirates (2011). A new novel, Das Bell, is under review by Baen Books. Berman’s background in astronomy and spaceflight strengthened his work ,while he took major leaps in creativity between each book he has written. Chris’s writing defies a set style in creating novels of hard science fiction, techno-thrillers, and alternate history; with each work of fiction, a unique literary adventure. His most recent accomplishments were receiving a Masters Degree in Military History from Norwich University and completing his thesis on women combat pilots of the Soviet Red Air Force in WWII. Two new novels will be released in early 2013: Ace of Aces, a tale of five WWII combat aces conscripted out of the timeline to battle an alien menace 340 years in the future, and Condosaur, a science fiction-horror tale of prehistoric predators on the loose in South Florida. www.freewebs.com/chrisbfla/
Emma Bolden’s first full-length collection of poems, Malificae, is forthcoming from GenPop Books. She is the author of three chapbooks of poetry: How to Recognize a Lady (Toadlily Press), The Mariner’s Wife (Finishing Line Press), and The Sad Epistles (Dancing Girl Press). She is an assistant professor of creative writing at Georgia Southern University.
Ryan Bollenbach is a poet and musician living just south of Tampa, Florida. His creative work can be read in Prick of the Spindle, and his editorial work can be read at www.sweetlit.com. He is hoping to enter into an MFA program for poetry in 2013.
Gaylord Brewer is the author of eight books of poetry, most recently Give Over, Graymalkin (Red Hen Press, 2011) and The Martini Diet (Dream Horse Press, 2008). He teaches at Middle Tennessee State University, where he edits the journal Poems & Plays.
Amber Brown is a junior in NEW College at the University of Alabama with a depth studies in creative writing and literature. She plans to go on to graduate school to earn an MFA in Creative Writing and then pursue a doctoral degree in Literature. She hopes one day to be an English professor.
Linda Buckmaster left her childhood Florida home in 1969 and took to the road, ending up in midcoast Maine where she's been for over three decades. Former Poet Laureate of her small town of Belfast, her poetry, essay, fiction, and journalism have appeared in regional and national journals. She travels whenever she can, including an annual trip to Mexico. She is currently working on a collection of essays about growing up in Space Coast Florida. Her personal blog can be accessed at lsbuck1.blogspot.com.
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