First Baptist Church of Madison 34-36 Cook Avenue, Madison, nj 07940



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First Baptist Church of Madison

34-36 Cook Avenue, Madison, NJ 07940

First Baptist Church Scholarship Application 20______



Guidelines

  • To be eligible for the First Baptist Church of Madison Scholarship, applicants must meet all of the requirements.

  • Incomplete applications will not be considered for evaluation.

  • Applications must have authentic original signatures. Faxes will not be considered for evaluation.


Requirements

  • Must be actively involved in your church, participating in Sunday School or Bible Study for the past year

  • Must be a prospective or high school graduate in the year of application.

  • Must use funds for undergraduate studies or school.

  • Must have a cumulative overall grade point average (G.P.A.) of 2.5 or above.

  • Submit ALL documentation and copies of registration as a student.

  • Completed application and supporting materials are due in to FBC office by If you prefer to submit your completed application and supporting materials via mail, the package must be postmarked by _________________________


Application Summary (all materials must be submitted at one time)

  • All applications must be typed or clearly printed in blue or black ink.

  • Every blank in the scholarship application must be completed. This includes a complete address and zip code. If a particular portion of the application does not apply to the applicant, N/A should be placed on the blank.

  • All applications must include an official high school transcript.

  • Applicants must submit two (2) letters of recommendation (recommenders cannot be related to applicants):

    • One letter of recommendation from the Pastor, Sunday School Superintendent, or person within the church leadership who knows the spiritual stewardship of the applicant.

    • The second letter of recommendation must be from a current/ former teacher, guidance counselor, principal who knows the academic capabilities of the applicant. Include the two (2) letters of recommendation in sealed envelopes with your completed application.


Policies/Procedures

  • The committee will evaluate each applicant based on the guidelines adopted.

  • Scholarships will be awarded annually provided the funds are available.

  • Recipients of a scholarship must enroll and remain in a school of higher

learning for the entire quarter, semester, and/or school year. If not, funds

will be forfeited and must be returned to First Baptist Church of Madison.

If there are mitigating circumstances that a recipient has no control over,

the scholarship award will be reinstated.







APPLICANT INFORMATION





Full Name:










Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy:







Last

First

M.I.





Address:










Street Address

Apartment/Unit #


















City

State

ZIP Code





Phone:

( )

Email Address:












EDUCATION






High School:







Name of High School





Address of High School:







Street Address or P.O. Box

















City

State

ZIP Code





Phone:

( )

Expected Date of Graduation (mm/dd/yyyy):












CHURCH INVOLVEMENT





List church related activities involved




1.




2.




3.



APPLICANT’S CERTIFICATION AND PERMISSION TO RELEASE INFORMATION


  • I hereby certify that all information submitted on this application is true and accurate to the best of my knowledge.

  • I understand that submitting nonfactual information will automatically disqualify me from consideration for all scholarships.

  • By submitting this application, I authorize my high school to make information concerning my academic records available to the First Baptist Church of Madison, Madison, NJ 07940


Applicant's Signature:_______________________________________________________ Date:____________________
Parent’s/Guardian’s Signature: _______________________________________________ Date: ___________________

OPTIONAL COUNSELOR’S OR PRINCIPAL’S


PLEASE NOTE: This section is optional and to be completed by your high school.

Cumulative High School
Grade Point Average: ____________ Rank in Class: ___________ Class Size: ____________

I hereby certify that the academic information provided in this section is correct to the best of my knowledge.
Signature _______________________________________________________

Please attach:

(1) Letter from Pastor (4) Proof of College Enrollment

(2) Official High School Transcript (5) Two (2) Letters of Recommendation

(3) Acceptance Letter from Institution of Higher Learning of your choice

Dear Member,


The Scholarship Committee of First Baptist Church of Madison invites you to apply for one of the _____________ scholarships that will be awarded in June of this year. The scholarships are awarded based upon church participation, school participation and financial need. We assure you that each applicant will be given equal consideration.
Please mail or bring your application (enclosed in envelope) to First Baptist Church of Madison, 34 Cook Avenue, Madison, NJ 07940 before the deadline. Please write on the envelope, Attention: Scholarship Committee, Deaconess Allie Brewster, Chairperson.
Thank you kindly for applying for one of First Baptist Church of Madison scholarships. Remember the deadline for returning the application is _________________ by ___________. If you have any questions, please contact one of the persons listed below.
Deaconess Allie Brewster, Chairperson
Deaconess Maxine Olidge, Church Secretary

How to Apply for Grants and Scholarships

Scholarships and grants come from a variety of sources. A few sources of grants and scholarships are:



  • Federal and state governments

  • Individual colleges and universities

  • Community organizations

  • Parents' and students' employers

Scholarships typically do not have to be repaid. Many scholarships are extremely competitive, so start researching early. To find grants and scholarships:

  • Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to give you an idea whether you are eligible for need-based financial aid.

  • Ask employers, clubs, associations, or other local groups if they offer scholarships.

  • Talk to the financial aid office at the college you plan to attend.

  • Talk to your high school counselor and find out if they know of any grants or scholarships.

  • Use the Internet to do a scholarship search. Review our list of financial aid resources for ideas about where to begin.

  • Beware of scholarship scams.

Writing a Cover Letter/Personal Essay for a Scholarship* **





  1. Use your resume as the database for the cover letter or essay. If you cannot include your resume with the cover letter or essay, as in most scholarship applications, you will need to include all information from your resume in the letter.




  1. Divide the material into specific areas, just as you would in a resume. These almost always include education, scholarships and awards, work experience and goals. Other categories you may or may not qualify for such as volunteer work, research projects, conference papers or presentations, independent study projects, affiliations, language and skills.




  1. You will need a strong organizing thesis statement or umbrella statement at the beginning in order to indicate the key categories that make you a good candidate.




  1. Introduce each section with a clear topic sentence, indicating which area you plan to discuss. They should contain key words to help direct the reader.

  • I have always chosen challenging courses, and have an excellent/ very good/ good academic record.

  • My academic achievement is demonstrated by the numerous scholarships I have received both at the high school and university level.

  • I have developed strong leadership skills, and know how to interact with a wide variety of other people while working several different jobs…

  • I have done a fair amount of community service including…

  • My independent research projects have strengthened my skills in laboratory work and developed in me an eye for details.

  • Tutoring has taught me to work diplomatically and successfully with a wide variety of students.

  • Travel has played a large role in shaping my view of others and of cultural differences.



  1. Your discussions should be result oriented. As a result of working at a bank, you value accuracy, efficiency and understand job responsibility.




  1. You should stress the qualities and areas of expertise that make you good candidate for the scholarship. To do this, refer to the qualifications listed with the scholarship. So, for example, if the committee considers financial need when deciding upon the candidates, make a point of your financial need but not in a tacky way. Committees often look for such things in a candidate as well:

    • Knowledge of chosen field, carefulness of work

    • Motivation, enthusiasm, seriousness of purpose

    • Creativity, originality, ingenuity of problem solving

    • Ability to plan and carry out research, organization

    • Ability to express thought in speech and writing

    • Maturity, emotional stability, ability to withstand stress and face challenges

    • Leadership skills

    • Self-reliance, initiative, independence, adaptability

    • Responsibility

    • Ability to work well with others

    • Growth potential, desire to achieve, dedication to goals




  1. You will need a concluding sentence that wraps the letter up and summarizes key strengths.




  1. Choice of words is important. Achieve a balance between bragging and modesty. Avoid exaggerations and clichés but do not down play your worth. A list of active word is included, as well.




  1. Proofread your letter/essay. Consider grammar, punctuation, and spelling. Avoid wordiness. Be clear and concise.




  1. Format the letter as a letter. That means addresses and the date at the top, a greeting (Dear Mrs. Wolf,) a closer (Sincerely,) and a signature above your name in print.




  1. Format the essay as an essay. If they’ve asked for an essay, do not submit a letter.



* More often than not, scholarships only require either a cover letter or personal essay. If only one is required, the body of text and guidelines remain the same but the format is done accordingly. If both are required, think of the cover letter as a small, tight introduction to the personal essay. If a cover letter, personal essay, and resume are required then the cover letter introduces you, the purpose for sending the packet of stuff you’re sending, and gives a brief overview of what to expect in the resume. The personal essay becomes an expansion of the resume as well as a source of information on those things we can’t glean from the resume or cover letter.
** Adapted from “Writing a Cover Letter for a Scholarship.” Maureen Thum, English Department Lecturer, U of M – Flint.

Tips: What to Do with a Scholarship Application Essay*





  1. Answer the Question. Review the question asked by the application. Has the student completely answered it? If not, what additional info needs to be included? How can it be effectively inserted into the text?




  1. Be Original. Is the essay individual and creative or does it give an unexciting narrative?




  1. Be Individual. Scholarship officers want to learn about the student and his or her writing ability. Is the essay meaningful and descriptive, about the student’s feelings and not entirely about actions?




  1. Don’t “Thesaurize” the Composition. Big words used inappropriately make for clunky, unconvincing essays.




  1. Use Imagery and Clear, Vivid Prose. A lot of students who come to us are not ease with using imagery so it’s up to us to see that all of the reader’s senses are engaged.




  1. Spend Most of Your Time on the Introduction. Expect scholarship officers to spend 1-2 minutes reading the essay. The introduction should grab the reader’s interest from the beginning. Some things to keep in mind:




    • Don’t summarize in the introduction. If you summarize, the scholarship officer need not read the rest of your essay.




    • Create mystery or intrigue in your introduction. It is not necessary or recommended that your first sentence give away the subject matter. Raise questions in the minds of the scholarship officers to force them to read on. Appeal to their emotions to make them relate to your subject matter.




  1. Relate Body Paragraphs to the Introduction. The introduction can be original but cannot be silly. The paragraphs that follow must relate to the introduction.




  1. Use Transitions. Applicants continue to ignore transitioning to their own detriment. Use transitions within paragraphs and especially between paragraphs to preserve the logical flow of the essay. Transitions are not limited to phrases like “as a result, in addition, while, since, etc.” but includes repeating key words and progressing the idea. Transitions provide the intellectual architecture to argument building.




  1. Conclude with a bang. The conclusion is the last chance to persuade or impress the reader. In the conclusion, avoid summary since the essay is usually short to begin with; the reader should not need to be reminded of what was written 300 words before. Also, do not use stock phrases like “in conclusion, in summary, to conclude, etc.”

High School Student Resume: Building a winning resume for your college applications


College admissions time is hectic for both students and parents. There are forms to fill out, essays to write, records to request, financial aid to consider, and schools to visit. To get a head start on the process, sophomore or junior year  is the time to begin gathering information for your child’s application. College may seem far away to a sophomore, but application deadlines will be here before you know it.

Why have a resume at all?

  • It’s the quickest way to tell college admissions officers all they need to know about a person, according to Acceptedtocollege.com. A standard college application doesn’t always give a student room to highlight all of his or her accomplishments and experience. A resume will help bridge that gap.

  • It will help your child keep track of his or her accomplishments, says The College Board. When the time comes to fill out college forms, it’s easy to forget one or two things from the list. A written resume will help remind the student of every pertinent detail.

  • It can spark a college admission essay topic. Schools want to learn about an applicant through his or her essay. Reflecting on experiences from summer jobs, volunteer work, or school activities may lead to a unique essay topic that will make your child stand out.

  • Activities and achievements can lead to scholarships. Scholarship committees look for participation in extracurriculars, and some require that recipients must be involved in a particular activity. Identifying areas of interest will help your student find the best scholarship opportunities.

  • An impressive resume can lead to summer internships, jobs, or study-abroad opportunities that will strengthen your child’s college applications.

  • With a comprehensive resume, your child can organize his or her priorities when deciding where to apply. University life is full of opportunities, in and out of the classroom, and the choices can be overwhelming. If your child participates in something like competitive rowing, which many universities don’t offer, he or she may want to seek out the schools that do, says collegeapps.about.com. Listing activities and accomplishments can help a student figure out what he or she wants to continue doing after high school, and which colleges will offer the greatest opportunities.

Why start during sophomore year?

  • It can help your child target non-academic areas that need improvement long before sending out college applications. Although genuine interest in an activity should always be what ultimately inspires participation, according to collageapps.about.com, it’s a fact that colleges look for students who are well rounded and have good time-management skills. If your child hasn’t participated in many extracurriculars, for instance, there is plenty of time to get involved in something new before application time.

  • It can help your child identify academic areas to boost. Ecampustours.com recommends that students list their GPA, but only if it’s above 3.0. If it’s lower than that, an early resume will give your student an idea of what needs attention before it’s too late to bring those numbers up. It will also get your child thinking about the importance of high SAT and ACT scores.

  • A resume is a great introduction to a college recruiter. College fairs don’t always allow for long talks between recruiters and students. A quick introduction and resume hand-off will give your child the chance to connect with as many recruiters as possible.

  • It will get a student thinking about potential references. College applications ask for recommendation letters from teachers, coaches, mentors, and employers, and it’s never too early for your child to line these up.

What should be included on the resume?

Resumes are as unique as the people who write them, but certain conventions should be followed. Here is a checklist of what to include, from acceptedtocollege.com:



  • Name, address, email, phone number. (Some schools may also want to see a Social Security number, but if you are concerned about identity theft, it shouldn’t be a problem to leave it off.)

  • Education information. This includes the name and address of the student’s high school, GPA (if it’s brag-worthy), and class rank (if the student knows it). College courses can also go in this section, if the student has taken any.

  • Activities. These can be in or out of school—for example, marching band, intramural basketball, or youth group at the student’s church or temple. Especially important are any leadership roles the student has taken in these groups.

  • Other experience. A part-time job, participation in a walk for cancer awareness, or contribution to a science fair are all pertinent details.

  • Accolades. Academic awards or awards in extracurricular competition—state wrestling champion or member of the top-ranking marching band in the region, for example.

  • References. Names and phone numbers of teachers, coaches, employers, or internship directors don’t necessarily have to go on the resume, but it’s good to have these people lined up in advance.

  • Anything else that makes your child shine. A resume is the one chance a student will have to tell college recruiters everything they need to know. If something makes the student unique and interesting, by all means include it. Fluency in a foreign language or proficiency in advanced computer programs may qualify here. A word of caution, however: Don’t go overboard. The resume should contain only what a specific school will want to know, according to The College Board.

Other tips

  • A poorly written resume can be worse than no resume at all. It should be proofread (more than once) to ensure correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

  • The resume should be in a professional-looking and easy-to-read font, such as Times New Roman or Arial. The formatting should catch the eye of the recipient and bring attention to key items.

  • Be honest. When students lie—or even stretch the truth—on their resumes, it can come back to haunt them later, particularly when it comes to things like GPA and test scores. Read your child’s resume carefully to ensure all of the information is accurate.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_5329262_write-high-school-scholarship-resume.html

Action Words*

Accelerated

Accomplished

Achieved

Acquired


Activated

Adapted


Addressed

Administrated

Advised

Allocated



Analyzed

Anticipated

Applied

Appointed



Appraised

Approved


Arranged

Assessed


Assisted

Assigned


Attained

Audited


Augmented

Averted


Avoided

Broadened

Built

Calculated



Centralized

Clarified

Collaborated

Combined


Completed

Composed


Conceived

Concluded

Condensed

Conducted

Consolidated

Constructed

Contributed

Controlled

Converted

Corrected

Created

Cultivated




Decentralized

Decreased

Defined

Delegated



Delivered

Demonstrated

Designed

Determined

Developed

Devised


Directed

Discharged

Discovered

Documented

Distributed

Doubled


Earned

Edited


Effected

Eliminated

Employed

Enforced


Engineered

Established

Estimated

Evaluated

Examined

Exceeded


Executed

Exercised

Expanded

Expedited

Extended

Extracted

Facilitated

Financed


Forecast

Formed


Formulated

Found


Founded

Framed


Fulfilled

Generated

Guided

Handled



Headed

Helped


Hired

Identified

Implemented

Improved


Improvised

Influenced

Initiated

Inspected

Installed

Inspired


Instigated

Instituted

Integrated

Instructed

Interpreted

Interviewed

Introduced

Invented


Invested

Investigated

Launched

Lectured


Led

Lightened

Liquidated

Located


Made

Maintained

Managed

Marketed


Mediated

Minimized

Mobilized

Modernized

Modified

Monitored

Motivated

Negotiated

Obtained

Operated


Ordered

Organized

Originated

Overcame


Oversaw


Participated

Performed

Pinpointed

Pioneered

Planned

Prepared


Presented

Processed

Procured

Produced


Projected

Programmed

Promoted

Proposed


Provided

Proved


Published

Purchased

Realized

Recommended

Reconciled

Recruited

Redesigned

Reduced


Re established

Regulated

Reinforced

Rejected


Relate

Re negotiated

Reorganized

Reported


Represented

Researched

Reshaped

Resolved


Restored

Revamped


Reviewed

Revised


Revitalized

Revived


Saved

Scheduled

Secured

Selected


Set up

Settled

Shaped


Showed

Simplified

Sold

Solved


Sorted

Sponsored

Staffed

Standardized



Stimulated

Started


Streamlined

Strengthened

Stretched

Structured

Studied

Suggested



Summarized

Supervised

Supported

Surpassed

Surveyed

Sustained

Tailored

Taught


Terminated

Tested


Tightened

Traded


Trained

Transacted

Transferred

Transformed

Translated

Trimmed


Tripled

Uncovered

Undertook

Unified


Used

Utilized


Verified

Vitalized



Widened

Won


Wrote



*Compiled by Cooperative Education and Career Center, U of M – Flint


When

Saturday October 25, 2014 from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM EDT


Add to Calendar 

Where

PAUL ROBESON CAMPUS CENTER RUTGERS-NEWARK


350 DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. BLVD.
Newark, NJ 07102

 
Driving Directions 

Contact

Dinean Robinson


United Way of Essex and West Hudson
973-854-2282
drobinson@uwewh.org

2014 Blueprint for Success Preparing for College, Work & Beyond 

For many students, navigating their way through high school is a challenging process; however, figuring out what to do AFTER graduation can be overwhelming and oftentimes scary. 

Whether preparing for college, vocational training, or seeking employment opportunities, this conference will give 9th-12th grade students and their parents the BLUEPRINT FOR SUCCESS, by equipping them with the knowledge and resources needed to successfully transition from high school to their next key milestone. 

This conference will offer:

● Customized workshops for parents and students



● Interactive lectures and panel discussions

● College & Career Resource Fair with over 15 participating schools, recruiters, and more!

Keynote by Kevin Powell Activist, Writer, Public Speaker

Kevin Powell is one of the most acclaimed political, cultural, literary, and hip-hop voices in America today. He is the author of 11 books, including "Barack Obama, Ronald Reagan, and the Ghost of Dr. King: Blogs and Essays.” Among his upcoming books will be a memoir of his very difficult childhood and youth, to be released in 2015 by Simon & Schuster; and in 2016 he will publish a biography of Tupac Shakur, the late rapper and controversial American icon. Kevin's writings have also appeared in CNN.com, Esquire, Ebony, The Huffington Post, The Washington Post, Rolling Stone, The Guardian, ESPN.com, and Vibe Magazine, where he worked for many years as a senior writer, interviewing public figures as different as Tupac Shakur and General Colin Powell. 

Register Now! 


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