Finding and using textual evidence



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FINDING AND USING TEXTUAL EVIDENCE

  • LINK
  • When analyzing literature, writers use details and examples to support their opinions about a story.
  • This is called using “Textual Evidence”

First, write the detail or example down. This may be a quotation or your sentence

  • First, write the detail or example down. This may be a quotation or your sentence
    • Introduce quotations with transitions ( do not just toss a quote in) that will prove the detail or your opinion.
    • Make sure to add your commentary after the quotation; this will explain how the quote proves what you say!
    • If you quote it discuss it!

Remember…

  • Use the present tense when writing about literature: The speaker in “Skylark” addresses a bird, not addressed a bird.
  • As in all forms of writing use active verbs: dramatizes, presents, suggests, points to, illustrates, asserts, stresses, connects, contrasts…

Turn to page 211

Assignment:

  • Write an essay how Walter has changed during the story Bad Boy. Use the organizers on pages 209-209 for the details about Walter’s behavior.
  • Then make sure to add commentary, opinions explaining Walter’s behavior and TEXTUAL EVIDENCE that explains why the details or examples support your opinion of Walter’s change.
  • Plan your essay on pgs. 211-212 then write a complete DRAFT on the paper I will hand out.
  • Finish draft as homework! Due tomorrow!

Example: pg. 211

  • TOPIC SENTENCE: At the beginning of the fifth grade, Walter is impulsive, distracting and violent, but by the end of the sixth grade he has found excitement and a sense of self through reading.
  • TOPIC SENTENCE/Detail/Example/ evidence and Commentary:
      • Walter is very distracting. On page 203, paragraph 9 it says, “I might roll a marble across my desk if she was on the other side of the room.” He rolls marbles across the desk and blurts out answers to questions. Walter always wants to be active and doesn’t realize how upsetting his actions are to the teacher.
      • In addition, Walter is violent. He…

Key: TOPIC SENTENCE/Detail/Example/ evidence and Commentary:

  • At the beginning of the fifth grade, Walter is impulsive, distracting and violent, but by the end of the sixth grade he has found excitement and a sense of self through reading. Walter is very distracting. On page 203, paragraph 9 it says, “I might roll a marble across my desk if she was on the other side of the room.” He rolls marbles across the desk and blurts out answers to questions. Walter always wants to be active and doesn’t realize how upsetting his actions are to the teacher. In addition, Walter is violent. He throws books across the room and hits fellow classmates when he gets upset. For example, on page 204, paragraph 13, “ I gave Sydney Aronofsky the biggest punch he had ever had in the back of his big head and was sent to the closet.”

Possible topic sentences: (use these to model from)

  • At the beginning of fifth grade, Walter is angry, embarrassed and violent, but by the end of sixth grade he becomes a leader, happy and filled with confidence.
  • At the beginning of the fifth grade, Walter is impulsive and violent, but by the end of the sixth grade he has found excitement and a sense of self through reading.
  • When Walter started fifth grade he was lonely, unconfident and a behavior problem, but by the end of sixth grade with the help of Mr. Lasher he becomes a confident, happy leader.

Prediction

  • It’s about a birthday.
  • The gift will be money.
  • Someone is sad.
  • Something bad will happen.
  • It’s a poor girl’s birthday.
  • Someone is going to cry.
  • Red means attention so someone will get all the attention.
  • There’s something about layers.

Rachel’s Narrator: Except when math period ends Mrs. Price says

  • Rachel’s Narrator: Except when math period ends Mrs. Price says
  • loud and in front of everybody,
  • Mrs. Price: “Now, Rachel, that’s enough,”
  • Rachel’s Narrator: because she sees I’ve shoved the red sweater to
  • the tippy-tip corner of my desk and it’s hanging all over the edge like
  • a waterfall, but I don’t care.
  • Mrs. Price: “Rachel,”
  • Mrs. Price’s Narrator: Mrs. Price says. She says it like she’s
  • getting mad.
  • Mrs. Price: “You put that sweater on right now and no more nonsense.”
  • Rachel: “But it’s not ---“
  • Mrs. Price: “Now!”
  • Mrs. Price’s Narrator: Mrs. Price says.

Prediction Confirmation

  • It’s about a birthday but the party will come later and it has been spoiled.
  • This prediction did not pan out.
  • Yes, Rachel ends up sad.
  • Mrs. Price embarrasses her.
  • We don’t really know if Rachel is poor or not.
  • Yes, Rachel cries like she’s three.
  • She gets attention all right but it’s negative.
  • We all have all the years we are inside of us like layers of who we are.
  • It’s about a birthday.
  • The gift will be money.
  • Someone is sad.
  • Something bad will happen.
  • It’s a poor girl’s birthday.
  • Someone is going to cry.
  • Red means attention so
  • someone will get all the attention.
  • There’s something about layers.

  • “Eleven” by Sandra Cisneros
  • What they don’t understand about birthdays and what they never tell you is that when you’re eleven, you’re also ten, and nine, and eight, and seven, six, and five, and four, and three and two and one. And when you wake up on your eleventh birthday you expect to feel eleven, but you don’t. You open eyes and everything’s just like yesterday, only it’s today. And you don’t feel eleven at all. You feel like you’re still ten. And you are-underneath the year that makes you eleven.
  • So, you really are like a set of
  • stacking dolls with the person
  • you were last year inside the
  • person you are this year. I feel
  • this when it’s my birthday
  • too. It takes a while to feel
  • like you’re the next year old.
  • This reminds me of what
  • Cao said about layers.
  • Making Connections

Figurative Language Devices

  • Simile--A figure of speech stating a comparison using like or as.
  • Metaphor--A figure of speech containing a comparison of two things
  • on the basis of a shared quality as if one thing
  • were the other.
  • Imagery--Words and phrases that describe what is seen, smelled,
  • tasted, or touched which when repeated in a pattern can
  • help to convey a particular impression about a character
  • or situation.
  • Symbol--A person, object, action, place or event that, in addition to
  • its literal meaning, suggests a more complex
  • meaning or range of meaning.

Strategies for Interacting with a Text

      • Character Frame and Coat of Arms
      • Literature Portrait
      • Character Evolution Timeline
      • Split Open Mind
      • Framed Found Poem
  • "Eleven"
  • In the story "Eleven" by Sandra Cisneros, the main character, Rachel, describes an incident on her eleventh
  • birthday that made a strong impression on her. Think about what happens to Rachel and how she feels about
  • the incident. How does it affect the way she feels about herself?
  • Write an essay in which you explain how you think Rachel views herself on her eleventh birthday. Consider
  • why she sees herself as she does, what affects her view, and if her feelings about herself change as a result of her
  • experience. How does the author show us Rachel's feelings and how do we know if those feelings change? Be sure
  • to use specific details from the text to show why you think the way you do--including one simile or metaphor taken
  • directly from the text and one original simile or metaphor of your own to describe Rachel's experiences. While
  • writing your paper, remember to follow the conventions of written English.
  • Your essay should be in standard analytical/ expository form: introduction, main body, and conclusion.
  • The best papers will:
  • Begin by introducing the subject, giving enough background for the reader to
  • follow the interpretation the writer offers in response to the prompt.
  • Clearly and carefully explain how Rachel sees herself on her eleven birthday.
  • Offer insights into why Rachel sees herself as she does, what affects her view,
  • and if her feelings change as a result of the incident.
  • Include at least one simile or metaphor form the text (as well as other quotes) as specific textual support
  • to establish how the author shows us Rachel’s feelings.
  • Create at least one original simile or metaphor of the writer’s own to capture Rachel’s thoughts and feelings.
  • Make a perceptive claim as to whether Rachel’s feelings change and substantiate this claim with a specific
  • analysis of the character’s actions and reactions.
  • Interpret with authority and advance logically to your conclusion.Have few, if any errors in the conventions
  • of written English (including the following rules for quoting from the text).

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