Faculty of engineering and natural sciences department of genetics and bioengineering first cycle study program specification



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FOURTH SEMESTER


Course Code: GBE 202

Course Name: BIOSTATISTICS

Level: Undergraduate

Year: II

Semester: IV

ECTS Credits: 4

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 2+2

Total Hours: 30+30

Course Description

This is a general introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics such as techniques and principles for summarizing data, estimation, hypothesis testing, and decision-making will be covered. Students are instructed on the proper use of statistical software to manage, manipulate, and analyze data and to prepare summary reports and graphical displays.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:

  • Explaining basic statistical tests.

  • Evaluating the results of statistical tests.

  • Demonstrating modern statistical methods including descriptive and inferential statistics.

  • Showing students that statistics is an important tool in many different disciplines, and is an important research tool.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Fundamentals of statistics

Week 2: Presenting data, part 1

Week 3: Presenting data, part 2

Week 4: Descriptive statistics, part 1

Week 5: Descriptive statistics, part 2

Week 6: Probability, part 1

Week 7: Probability, part 2

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Probability distributions, part 1

Week 10: Probability distributions, part 2

Week 11: Sampling distributions and confidence intervals, part 1

Week 12: Sampling distributions and confidence intervals, part 2

Week 13: Fundamentals of hypothesis testing, part 1

Week 14: Fundamentals of hypothesis testing, part 2

Week 15: Preparation for final exam



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT

Week 1: Beginning of classes

Week 2, Lab 1: Introduction to MS Excel

Week 3, Lab 2: Making tables and diagrams in Excel, part 1

Week 4, Lab 3: Making tables and diagrams in Excel, part 2

Week 5, Lab 4: Descriptive statistics in Excel, part 1

Week 6, Lab 5: Descriptive statistics in Excel, part 2

Week 7, Lab 6: Preparation for mid-term



Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9, Lab 7: Probability

Week 10 Lab 8: Chi-square

Week 11, Lab 9: ANOVA

Week 12, Lab 10: Student’s t-test

Week 13, Lab 11: Regression



Week 14: Preparation for lab exam

Week 15: Exam from lab course

Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Deliver an effective presentation of data

  2. Perform probability testing

  3. Explain the fundamentals of hypothesis testing

  4. Make tables and diagrams

  5. Operate descriptive statistics in excel

  6. Perform the student t test

  7. Perform ANOVA

  8. Perform regression analysis in excel

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Kreyszig, E. (2001). Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 8th ed. Hoboken, NJ, USA: John Wiley and Sons


Recommended Literature

Bhishma R. (2005). Probability and Statistics for Engineers, 2nd ed. New York City, NY, USA: Sitech

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

12

12

Preparation for Final Examination

1

16

16

Assignment / Homework / Project




4

4

Seminar / Presentation




4

4

Total Workload

100

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

4




Course Code: GBE 206

Course Name: MOLECULAR BIOLOGY II

Level: Undergraduate

Year: II

Semester: IV

ECTS Credits: 5

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 2+2

Total Hours: 30+30

Course Description

As the second part of a two-part course series in Molecular biology, this course covers advanced topics on gene regulation, protein modifications and ubiquitination, DNA and RNA polymerase, and small RNAs. Current topics, like RNA interference and epigenetics, are also introduced. Final part of the course is devoted to the study of genome stability and evolution. This is taken concurrently with a laboratory course.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:


  • Enabling students to move beyond their introductory textbooks towards a deeper understanding of modern molecular biology.

  • Providing detailed descriptions of all molecular mechanisms.

  • Introduction to genomics and systematics.

  • Providing an insight into the regulation of gene expression at different levels.

  • Presenting model organisms in molecular biology.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Introduction to the course

Week 2: DNA-related proteins

Week 3: Polymerase dynamics

Week 4: Small RNAs

Week 5: Regulation of gene expression by different types of RNA

Week 6: RNA silencing pathways

Week 7: RNA interference

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Epigenetics

Week 10: Post-translational modifications

Week 11: Protein folding and ubiquitination

Week 12: Molecular mechanisms of cell differentiation

Week 13: The stability of the genome

Week 14: Sequence conservation and homology

Week 15: Techniques in molecular biology



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT

Week 1: Beginning of classes 

Week 2, Lab 1: Introduction to protein analysis

Week 3, Lab 2: Protein isolation from kiwi plant

Week 4, Lab 3: β-glucosidase isolation from white button mushroom; protein salting-out

Week 5, Lab 4: Protein quantification: Bradford method

Week 6, Lab 5: Preparation of animal tissue for protein isolation: Chicken muscle

Week 7, Lab 6: Protein isolation from a bacterial culture

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9, Lab 7: Protein spectrophotometry by Lowry

Week 10 Lab 8: PAGE: Introduction and safety considerations

Week 11, Lab 9: SDS-PAGE, part I

Week 12, Lab 10: SDS-PAGE, part II

Week 13, Lab 11: Result analysis



Week 14: Preparation for practical exam

Week 15: Practical exam from lab course

Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations

  • Laboratory work

Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

%

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Determine comparative genomic studies in prokaryotes and eukaryotes

  2. Deduce gene expression levels and regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes

  3. Debate molecular mechanisms underlying the processes of gene regulation in different organisms

  4. Perform protein isolation in the laboratory from various samples: animal, plant, human

  5. Operate quantification of the isolated proteins in the laboratory

  6. Perform SDS-PAGE

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


Molecular Biology I

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Alberts, B., Johnson, A., Lewis, J., Raff, M., Roberts, K., & Walter, P. (2007). Molecular biology of the cell, 5th ed. New York, NY, USA: Garland Science


Recommended Literature

Karp, G. (2013). Cell and molecular biology: Concepts and experiments, 7th ed. Hoboken, NJ, USA: John Wiley

Sambrook, J. & Russell, D. W. (2006). The condensed protocol from molecular cloning: A laboratory manual. Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA: CSHL Press



ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

12

12

Preparation for Final Examination

1

13

13

Assignment / Homework / Project




18

18

Seminar / Presentation




18

18

Total Workload

125

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5



Course Code: GBE 210

Course Name: BIOCHEMISTRY

Level: Undergraduate

Year: II

Semester: IV

ECTS Credits: 6

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 3+2

Total Hours: 45+30

Course Description

This course provides a broad survey of biochemistry from the molecular aspects. It covers the major chemical and biological foundations of biochemistry. The first section of the course focuses on topics related to carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Special emphasis is given to the processes of protein synthesis and gene expression. The second part of the course focuses on the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and nitrogen. All these cycles are analyzed through a medical and molecular perspective.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:


  • Providing a theoretical and applied bacground in the field of biochemistry

  • Defining the molecular components of the cell

  • Illustrating the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and nitrogen

  • Illustrating normal biochemical test results

  • Interpreting abnormal results

  • Interpreting biochemical laboratory tests

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Introduction to Biochemistry

Week 2: Major Components of the body, Molecular Composition of Cells

Week 3: Water, Acids, Bases and Buffers

Week 4: Aminoacids

Week 5: Proteins; Structure

Week 6: Protein function

Week 7: Enzymes; Enzyme Kinetics

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Nucleic Acids

Week 10: Carbohydrates

Week 11: Carbohydrate metabolism

Week 12: Lipids

Week 13: Lipid metabolism

Week 14: Nitrogen metabolism

Week 15: Hormones and metabolism integration



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT

Week 1: Beginning of classes

Week 2, Lab 1: Basic calculations

Week 3, Lab 2: Solution preparation, buffers

Week 4, Lab 3: Quantitative estimation of amino acids by ninhydrin

Week 5, Lab 4: Separation of amino acids by TLC

Week 6, Lab 5: Titration curves of amino acids

Week 7, Lab 6: Isoelectric precipitation of proteins



Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9, Lab 7: Effect of temperature on enzyme kinetics

Week 10 Lab 8: Effect of enzyme concentration on enzyme kinetics

Week 11, Lab 9: Effect of substrate concentration on enzyme kinetics

Week 12, Lab 10: Qualitative analysis of carbohydrates

Week 13, Lab 11: Estimation of saponification value of fats and oils



Week 14: Preparation for practical exam

Week 15: Practical exam from lab course

Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations

  • Laboratory work




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Explain molecular basics of organisms

  2. Summarize amino-acids and proteins

  3. Categorize enzymes

  4. Identify carbohydrates

  5. Classify lipids

  6. Interpret gluconeogenesis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and glycogen metabolism

  7. Illustrate Krebs cycle, electron-transport chain

  8. Use basic laboratory skills and procedures in biochemistry labs

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Boyer, R. F. (2006). Concepts in biochemistry, 3rd ed. Hoboken, New Jersey, USA: Wiley.

Recommended Literature

  • Lieberman, M., Marks, A. D., Smith, C. M., & Marks, D. B. (2007). Marks' essential medical biochemistry, 1st ed. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  • Garrett, R. H., & Grisham, C. M. (2001). Principles of biochemistry: with a human focus, 1st ed. Salt Lake City, Utah, USA: Thomson Brooks/Cole.

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

3

45

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

15

15

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project




20

20

Seminar / Presentation




20

20

Total Workload

149

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

6


Course Code: GBE 330

Course Name: BIOSENSORS

Level: Undergraduate

Year: II

Semester: IV

ECTS Credits: 5

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 2 + 2

Total Hours: 30 + 30

Course Description

Biosensors have emerged as an exciting research area due to the integration of molecular biology with electronics to form devices of modern time. This course will introduce fundamentals of microbiology and biochemistry from engineering prospective and give a comprehensive introduction to the basic features of biosensors. Types of most common biological agents and the ways in which they can be interfaced with a variety of transducers to create a biosensor for biomedical applications will be discussed. Focus will be on optical biosensors, immunobiosensors, and nanobiosensors. New technologies, related research highlights, and main machine interface will also be covered.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:

  • Introduction to sensors, especially biosensor-technology to genetics and bioengineering students and the ones who are interested in the subject.

  • Explaining basic concepts in biosensing and bioelectronics.

  • Clarifying typical problems in biosensing and bioelectronics.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Introduction/Overview of the field and applications of biosensors

Week 2: Measurement accuracy and sources of errors

Week 3: Characteristics and operational modes of sensors

Week 4: Static and dynamic characteristics of biosensors

Week 5: Measurement standards

Week 6: Sensor networks and communication

Week 7: Preparation for mid-term exam

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Biological sensing elements

Week 10: Calorimetric biosensors

Week 11: Potentiometric biosensors

Week 12: Amperometric biosensors

Week 13: Optical biosensors

Week 14: Piezoelectric biosensors

Week 15: Immunobiosensors



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT

Week 1: Beginning of classes

Week 2, Lab 1: Introduction/Overview of the field and applications of biosensors

Week 3, Lab 2: Measurement accuracy and sources of errors

Week 4, Lab 3: Characteristics and operational modes of sensors

Week 5, Lab 4: Static and dynamic characteristics of biosensors

Week 6, Lab 5: Measurement standards

Week 7, Lab 6: Sensor networks and communication



Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9, Lab 7: Biological sensing elements

Week 10 Lab 8: Calorimetric biosensors

Week 11, Lab 9: Potentiometric and amperometric biosensors

Week 12, Lab 10: Optical biosensors

Week 13, Lab 11: Piezoelectric and immunobiosensors



Week 14: Preparation for practical exam

Week 15: Practical exam from lab course

Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations

  • Laboratory work

Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe physical operating principles of biosensors

  2. Describe the biology of sensing elements

  3. Differentiate a variety of biosensors

  4. Recognize limitations of biosensors

  5. Predict application areas for different types of biosensors

  6. Distinguish measurement accuracy and sources of errors in biosensors

  7. State technical characteristics of biosensors

  8. Discuss measurement standards and sensors network and communication

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None.

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Raden, J.F. (2010). Handbook of Modern Sensors, Physics, Designs and Applications. New York, NY, USA: Springer-Verlag

Recommended Literature

Enderle, J. & Bronzino, J. (2011). Introduction to Biomedical Engineering, 3rd ed. Burlington, MA, USA: Elsevier Academic Press

Webster, J.G. & Eren, H. (2014). Measurement, Instrumentation, and Sensors Handbook, 2nd ed. Boca Raton, FL, USA: CRC Press



ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

14

14

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project

1

18

18

Seminar / Presentation

1

14

14

Total Workload

125

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5


FIFTH SEMESTER


Course Code: GBE 303

Course Name: INTERNSHIP

Level: Undergraduate

Year: III

Semester: V

ECTS Credits: 5

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 0+4

Total Hours: 0+60

Course Description

Students must complete a 30-working-day (6 weeks) practice in a bio-company. Students are expected to learn about a real working environment and get involved in many aspects of genetics and bioengineering development processes. Also, they are expected to start understand what is required for effective day-to-day laboratory maintenance and to develop the sense of responsibility. Internship could be completed either in private or public biology-related sector. Observations from practical training must be documented and presented in the form of a clear and concise technical report (Internship Notebook). Student must also prepare a short portfolio with a MS PowerPoint presentation.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:


  • Encouraging students to develop a sense of responsibility.

  • Enabling practical training.

  • Teaching students to prepare reports.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



During this practice, students should be introduced to all types of work and practice that is conducted in the company, institute, or laboratory.

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Students acquire on-the-job training as they complete their practice.




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

0 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

0 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

0 %

Class Deliverables

50 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

50 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:


  1. Express the ability to work effectively as part of a team

  2. Demonstrate interpersonal, organizational, and problem solving skills within a managed environment

  3. Practice personal responsibility

  4. Describe and discuss information in oral, written or graphic forms in order to communicate effectively with peers and tutors

  5. Apply and analyze theory, techniques and relevant tools to the specification, analysis, design, implementation and testing of samples

  6. Judge on the company and/or team performance according to the work experience gained during internship

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

N/A

Recommended Literature

N/A

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

4

60

Defense (1 week)

1

30

30

Internship Notebook Preparation (1 week)

1

20

20

Seminar / Presentation

1

15

15

Total Workload

125

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5



Course Code: GBE 307

Course Name: BIOINFORMATICS

Level: Undergraduate

Year: III

Semester: V

ECTS Credits: 5

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 2+2

Total Hours: 30+30

Course Description

The aim of the course is to establish a basic background in the significant and more emerging field of bioinformatics. Its main subjects are PubMed and Medline databases, DNA- and protein-based bioinformatics tools, as well as several new and emerging information tools. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of genetics and molecular biology concepts in order to fully benefit from utilization of available information sources. The course is organized concurrently with a laboratory course in which students are applying bioinformatics in practice in order to analyze DNA, RNA, and protein sequences, as well as to study phylogeny.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:

  • Showing the importance of bioinformatics as a method to overcome modern biomedical research problems.

  • Enabling skill development in software using, critical evaluation of the results and their interpretation.

  • Illustrating how to work with DNA sequences.

  • Explaining how to work with protein sequences.

  • Illustrating how to construct phylogenetic trees.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Introduction to bioinformatics

Week 2: PubMed

Week 3: Using nucleotide sequence databases

Week 4: Using protein and specialized sequence databases

Week 5: Working with a single DNA sequence

Week 6: Working with a single nucleotide sequence

Week 7: Similarity searches on sequence databases

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Comparing two sequences

Week 10: Building a multiple sequence alignment

Week 11: Editing and publishing alignments

Week 12: Working with protein 3D structures

Week 13: Working with RNA

Week 14: Building phylogenetic trees: NJ method

Week 15: Building phylogenetic trees: UPGMA method



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT

Week 1: Beginning of classes

Week 2, Lab 1: PubMed

Week 3, Lab 2: Using nucleotide sequence databases

Week 4, Lab 3: Using protein and specialized sequence databases

Week 5, Lab 4: Working with a single DNA sequence

Week 6, Lab 5: Working with a single nucleotide sequence

Week 7, Lab 6: Similarity searches on sequence databases



Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9, Lab 7: Comparing two sequences

Week 10 Lab 8: Building a multiple sequence alignment

Week 11, Lab 9: Editing and publishing alignments

Week 12, Lab 10: Working with protein 3D structures

Week 13, Lab 11: Building phylogenetic trees



Week 14: Preparation for practical exam

Week 15: Practical exam from lab course

Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations

  • Laboratory work




Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Use PubMed for article browsing

  2. Employ NCBI for sequence analysis

  3. Operate single DNA sequences

  4. Perform similarity searches

  5. Perform multiple sequence alignments

  6. Discover different protein databases

  7. Create phylogenetic trees

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Claverie, J. M. & Notredame, C. (2006). Bioinformatics for Dummies, 2nd ed. Hoboken, NJ, USA: Wiley

Recommended Literature

Campbell, A. M. &Heyer, L. J. (2006). Discovering Genomics, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics, 2nd ed. San Francisco, CA, USA: Benjamin Cummings.

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

15

15

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project




13

13

Seminar / Presentation




18

18

Total Workload

125

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5



Course Code: GBE 309

Course Name: HUMAN GENETICS

Level: Undergraduate

Year: III

Semester: V

ECTS Credits: 5

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 2+2

Total Hours: 30+30

Course Description

This course will focus on concepts such as organization, structure, function, and mapping of the human genome; biochemical and molecular basis, screening, prevention, and treatment of various human diseases; genetic variation in humans; gene frequencies in human populations; human developmental genetics, medical genetics, and other aspects of human heredity. This course focuses on the role of genes in human biology. Selected areas of emphasis range from gene structure and identification, inheritance mechanisms (how genes are passed from parent to offspring), and how genes work within the cellular environment, mutations and the consequences of these malfunctions (genetic diseases), to the genetic structure of whole populations, and finally to ethical, legal, and social issues surrounding the application of the new genetic engineering technologies. Basic areas of modern genetics will be covered, with an emphasis primarily on humans. This is taken concurrently with a laboratory course.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:

  • Explaining the role of genes in human biology.

  • Providing the basic concepts of molecular genetics.

  • Introduction to population genetics.

  • Illustrating how to analyze human pedigrees and how to perform gene mapping.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Introduction to human genetics

Week 2: The basics of human genetics: Structure and function of the human genome

Week 3: The mechanisms involved in genetic variation at the level of gene and gene product, mutagenesis and DNA repair, mutations as a cause of genetic disorders

Week 4: Human Genome Project

Week 5: Pedigree analysis

Week 6: Linkage analysis

Week 7: Gene mapping

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: The basic principles of inheritance: Mendelian and non-Mendelian genetics (UDP, dynamic mutations, mosaicism, imprinting)

Week 10: Multifactorial inheritance: Interaction of genes and environmental factors

Week 11: Laboratory methods of DNA (DNA typing/profiling, RFLP, PCR, STR, mtDNA and Y chromosome analysis) and chromosome (karyotyping and FISH) analysis in human genetic practice

Week 12: Introduction to gene therapy

Week 13: Interpretation and application of various human genetic tests

Week 14: Introduction to human population genetics

Week 15: Ethical, legal, and social aspects of human genetic testing



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT

Week 1: Beginning of classes 

Week 2, Lab 1: Introduction

Week 3, Lab 2: Human pedigree analysis

Week 4, Lab 3: Human pedigree analysis

Week 5, Lab 4: Genetic linkage and mapping

Week 6, Lab 5: Mitochondrial DNA isolation from hair (Chelex method)

Week 7, Lab 6: Restriction digestion of mtDNA from hair



Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9, Lab 7: DNA isolation from buccal swab (Chelex method)

Week 10 Lab 8: Polymerase chain reaction: Theoretical introduction

Week 11, Lab 9: PCR analysis of Rh factor inheritance in humans

Week 12, Lab 10: Agarose gel electrophoresis of PCR products

Week 13, Lab 11: Agarose gel of PCR products: Results interpretation

Week 14: Preparation for practical exam

Week 15: Practical exam from lab course



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations

  • Laboratory work

Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Perform pedigree analysis

  2. Clarify gene mapping

  3. Interpret various human genetic tests

  4. Perform DNA isolation

  5. Illustrate the molecular mechanism of PCR and perform PCR

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Lewis, R. (2009). Human Genetics: Concepts and Applications, 9th ed. New York, NY, USA: McGraw-Hill


Recommended Literature

Sudbery, P. & Sudbery, I. (2010). Human and Molecular Genetics, 3rd edition. New York, NY, USA: Pearson Education Ltd

Pasternak, J.J. (2005). An Introduction to Human Molecular Genetics: Mechanisms of Inherited Diseases, 2nded. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons

Cummings, M.R (2014). Human Heredity, 10th ed. Belmont, USA: Brooks/Cole



ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

14

14

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project

1

16

16

Seminar / Presentation

1

16

16

Total Workload

125

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5




Course Code: GBE 325

Course Name: BIOMEDICAL SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS

Level: Undergraduate

Year: III

Semester: V

ECTS Credits: 5

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 2+2

Total Hours: 30+30

Course Description

This course will introduce students to medical and biomedical engineering concepts. The focuses are on how signal analysis can clarify the understanding of biomedical signal interpretation and diagnosis. Topics include EEGs, ECGs, EMGs, respiratory and blood pressure (how they are generated and measured), biosignals as random processes, spectral analysis, wavelets, time-frequency functions, and signal processing for pattern recognition.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:


  • Introduction to the principles of biomedical signals and systems through ECG, EEG, EMG, NIBP, IBP and respiratory examples.

  • Explaining the importance of engineering in medicine.

  • Giving an outline of characteristics of biomedical signals.

  • Providing basic concepts about the human heart.

  • Providing basic concepts about the respiratory system.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Summary and history of biomedical engineering

Week 2: Cell physiology, bio-potentials, membrane, and active potentials

Week 3: Bioelectrical phenomena, neurons, synaptic transmission

Week 4: Biomedical signals: ECG, EEG, EMG, EOG, respiratory signal, biomedical sensors, biomedical signals processing

Week 5: Human heart, cardio-cycle, electrocardiogram, vectocardiogram, electrical field of the heart, methods of ECG signal acquisition

Week 6: Methods for acquisition, processing and visualization of ECG signal, heart’s rhythm diagnostic

Week 7: ECG waveform and significant segments, ECG interpretation and diagnostics, pacemaker

WEEK 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Respiratory signal, measurement, extraction from ECG, and measuring respiratory signals

Week 10: Blood pressure, invasive and non-invasive measurement methods, biosensors and transducers

Week 11: Methods for acquisition, processing and visualization of EEG signal

Week 12: Recording and interpretation of EEG, basic concepts and EEG phenomena

Week 13: Electrodes for bio-potential measurement, basic electrochemical processes in the cell and tissues, aspects and methods of bioimpedance measurement

Week 14: Electrochemical sensors and dialysis: Chemical sensors, separation of the blood components

Week 15: Preparation for the final exam



WEEK 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT:

Week 1-11: The laboratory course is designed so that the students go through a series of virtual labs and analyze the studied equipment: their modes of functioning, components, and therapeutic importance in determining diagnosis.

Teaching Methods

Description

(list up to 4 methods)




  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Consultations

  • Laboratory work

Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

(please write 5-8 outcomes)



On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Define biomedical system modeling

  2. Assess different aspects and methods of applying engineering principles in medicine

  3. Review characteristics of biomedical signals

  4. Arrange principles of design and implementation of medical devices for physiological signal processing

  5. Interpret results of ECG and EEG signals

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Raden, J.F. (2010). Handbook of Modern Sensors, Physics, Designs and Applications. New York, NY, USA: Springer-Verlag

Recommended Literature

Enderle, J. & Bronzino, J. (2011). Introduction to Biomedical Engineering, 3rd ed. Burlington, MA, USA: Elsevier Academic Press

Webster, J.G. & Eren, H. (2014). Measurement, Instrumentation, and Sensors Handbook, 2nd ed. Boca Raton, FL, USA: CRC Press



ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

14

14

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project




14

14

Seminar / Presentation




18

18

Total Workload

125

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5



SIXTH SEMESTER


Course Code: GBE 392

Course Name: GENETICS AND BIOENGINEERING PROJECT

Level: Undergraduate

Year: III

Semester: VI

ECTS Credits: 5

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 0+4

Total Hours: 0+60

Course Description

This course requires each student to work on a short research project, effectively communicate with their mentors, and apply genetics and bioengineering knowledge in their research work. At the end of research project, each student should submit a hardcopy of the project and defend it with poster presentation in front of a committee containing three juries.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:

  • Enabling students to combine theoretical and practical ability for preparation a genetic engineering project and a presentation to the class.

  • Providing material for students to document the research results with a proposal of a design project.

  • Providing students with the experience of conceiving, designing, and implementing a research project proposed.

  • Preparing students to present the implemented project orally.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



  • Announcement of project proposals by the Department

  • Choosing any of proposed projects, or proposing student’s own project

  • Announcement of the projects assigned to students

  • Mentor-student communication

  • Doing literature review and practical research (if applicable)

  • Submitting all necessary administrative forms

  • Finalizing MS Word version of GBE project

  • Project defense in the form of poster presentation in front of jury members

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations

  • Laboratory work

Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

0 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

50 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

0 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

50 %

Final Exam

0 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Actively participate in courses and begin to take responsibility for learning

  2. Begin to work effectively as par to of a team, developing interpersonal, organizational, and problem solving skills within a managed environment, exercising some personal responsibility

  3. Present information in oral, written or graphic forms in order to communicate effectively with peers and tutors

  4. Apply theory, techniques and relevant tools to the specification, analysis, design, implementation and testing.

  5. Evaluate theories, processes and outcomes within an ambiguous setting

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

N/A

Recommended Literature




ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

4

60

Assignment / Homework / Project

1

40

40

Seminar / Presentation

1

20

25

Total Workload

125

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5



Course Code: GBE 304

Course Name: FORENSIC GENETICS

Level: Undergraduate

Year: III

Semester: VI

ECTS Credits: 5

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 2+2

Total Hours: 30+30

Course Description

Forensic genetics is the application of science to law and it encompasses various scientific disciplines. This course will introduce various methodologies and applications used in forensic context, as well as the workflow characteristic for forensic investigations. Real forensic cases are used to introduce technique and theory, to demonstrate how case solving requires an interdisciplinary team approach, and to allow students to practice their analytical and logical reasoning skills. Laboratory course is offered concurrently with lectures and is introducing practical research in forensics (such as sample collection, presumptive evidence testing, and DNA analysis and individualization), as well as statistical calculations necessary for presenting evidence in the court.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:


  • Introduction to various disciplines and methodologies in forensic genetics.

  • Teaching the roles of numerous scientific disciplines in crime investigations.

  • Explaining the importance of analytical tools in forensic investigation.

  • Explaining the importance of crime scene processing.

  • Introduction to forensic anthropology and odontology.

  • Describing how gender, mitochondrial, and Y-chromosomal DNA analyses are performed.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Presentation of syllabus and course

Week 2: Introduction to forensic genetics: Basic principles and historical development, branches of forensic genetics

Week 3: Basic genetic, medical, and biochemical principles of forensic DNA testing

Week 4: Evaluation of biological traces suitable for DNA analysis: Classification, collection, packaging, labeling, and preservation

Week 5: Presumptive and confirmatory testing

Week 6: Application of molecular-genetic techniques in forensics (DNA extraction, amplification, qualitative and quantitative characterization)

Week 7: Basic parameters and standards of a successful forensic genetics lab

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Lineage markers

Week 10: DNA identification of mass disaster victims

Week 11: Application of statistical, population, and medical studies in forensic genetics

Week 12: Disputed paternity and maternity testing

Week 13: Ethical, legal and, social aspects of DNA testing; Creation of national databases

Week 14: Application of DNA analysis results in legal and crime investigations; DNA testing legislation

Week 15: Preparation for final exam



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENT

Week 1: Beginning of classes

Week 2, Lab 1: Types of evidence (DNA and non-DNA), fingerprint analysis

Week 3, Lab 2: Evidence collection, labeling, and packaging

Week 4, Lab 3: Crime scene (sample collection)

Week 5, Lab 4: Presumptive and confirmatory tests

Week 6, Lab 5: Kastle-Meyer test and starch-iodine radial diffusion test

Week 7, Lab 6: DNA analysis: DNA isolation (Qiagen)



Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9, Lab 7: DNA analysis: DNA quantification by spectrophotometry

Week 10 Lab 8: DNA analysis: RFLP, VNTR, individualization

Week 11, Lab 9: RFLP result interpretation

Week 12, Lab 10: Paternity testing, paternity index or combined paternity index, probability of paternity, Random Man Not Excluded

Week 13, Lab 11: STR profiles



Week 14: Preparation for practical exam

Week 15: Practical exam from lab course

Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations

  • Laboratory work

Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:


  1. Apply all sorts of forensic and genetic analysis methods in processing human, animal and plant biological trace samples

  2. Operate forensic samples for forensic analysis

  3. Assess the importance of forensic genetics in legal medicine and juridical procedures

  4. Conduct DNA isolation

  5. Categorize various sequencing methods

  6. Explain STR profiling and the use of CODIS

  7. Employ forensic statistics

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Houck, M.M. & Siegel, J. A. (2010). Fundamentals of Forensic Science, 2nd ed. Waltham, MA, USA: Academic Press


Recommended Literature

Butler, J. M. (2009). Fundamentals of DNA Typing, 1sted. Waltham, MA, USA: Academic Press

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

14

14

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project




16

16

Seminar / Presentation




16

16

Total Workload

125

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5




Course Code: GBE 321

Course Name: INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS

Level: Undergraduate

Year: III

Semester: VI

ECTS Credits: 5

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 2+2

Total Hours: 30+30

Course Description

This course will introduce students to the principles of fuzzy logic systems and artificial neural network systems. The focuses are on using these methods for solving different problems in Bioengineering. Topic include neural networks architectures and fuzzy systems, learning algorithms and application, Matlab software - Neural Network Toolbox and Fuzzy Logic Toolbox. Student will acquire knowledge various neural network and fuzzy systems models. Student is also expected to work effectively as part of a team, to develop interpersonal, organizational, and problem-solving skills within a managed environment and to exercise some personal responsibility.


Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:


  • To provide students with an understanding of the fundamental theory of neural networks, fuzzy logic systems, eule-based systems and expert system development.

Course Content

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Introduction: Characteristics of ANN and Fuzzy Systems, Biological Neuron, Artificial Neuron, Artificial Neural Networks

Week 2: Phases in ANN Operation, Network Classification

Week 3: Phases in ANN Operation, Network Classification

Week 4: Unsupervised Learning: Hebbian Learning, Competitive Learning & Boltzmann Learning

Week 5: Unsupervised Learning: Hebbian Learning, Competitive Learning & Boltzmann Learning

Week 6: Supervised Learning (Error-Correction learning) and Reinforcement Learning

Week 7: Supervised Learning (Error-Correction learning) and Reinforcement Learning

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Perceptrons and Multilayer Perceptrons

Week 10: Neural network Applications

Week 11: Neural network Applications

Week 12: Fuzzy Sets and Operations

Week 13: Fuzzy Representation of Structured Knowledge

Week 14: Fuzzy System application and Fuzzy sense in ANN

Week 15: Expert systems based on fuzzy logic and artificial neural network



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENTS

Week 1: Beginning of classes

Week 2, Lab 1: Introduction: Characteristics of ANN and Fuzzy Systems, Biological Neuron, Artificial Neuron, Artificial Neural Networks

Week 3, Lab 2: Phases in ANN Operation, Network Classification

Week 4, Lab 3: Unsupervised Learning: Hebbian Learning, Competitive Learning & Boltzmann Learning

Week 5, Lab 4: Unsupervised Learning: Hebbian Learning, Competitive Learning & Boltzmann Learning

Week 6, Lab 5: Supervised Learning (Error-Correction learning) and Reinforcement Learning

Week 7, Lab 6: Supervised Learning (Error-Correction learning) and Reinforcement Learning



Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9, Lab 7: Perceptrons and Multilayer Perceptrons

Week 10 Lab 8: Neural network Applications

Week 11, Lab 9: Fuzzy Sets and Operations

Week 12, Lab 10: Fuzzy Representation of Structured Knowledge

Week 13, Lab 11: Fuzzy System application and Fuzzy sense in ANN

Week 14, Lab 12: Expert systems based on fuzzy logic and artificial neural network

Week 15: Exam from lab course

Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK


Teaching Methods

Description

(list up to 4 methods)




  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Consultations

Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

(please write 5-8 outcomes)



On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Designing and applying fuzzy logic system to solve engineering control problems where only expert linguistic knowledge is available,

  2. Designing and applying artificial neural network for solving problems,

  3. Different aspects and methods of applying fuzzy logic system and artificial neural network in Bioengineering,

  4. The difference between the classical algorithmic way of solving the problems and the corresponding learning procedures of artificial neural networks,

  5. Technical possibilities, the advantages and the limitations of the fuzzy logic systems, artificial neural network systems,

  6. Usage of available software tools such as Matlab Neural Network Toolbox.

  7. Developing Intelligent Expert Systems for solving complex problems in the Bioengineering area.

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

S. Kumar, “Neural Networks: A Classroom Approach,” McGraw Hill, 2005.

J.M. Mendel, “Uncertain Rule-Based Fuzzy Logic Systems”, Prentice-Hall, 2001

Timothy Ross, Fuzzy Logic with Engineering Applications, John Wiley & Sons Inc., 2010.

Sandhya Samarasingh, Neural Networks for Applied Sciences and Engineering: From Fundamentals to Complex Pattern Recognition, Auerbach Publications, 2006

S. Haykin, “Neural Networks: A Comprehensive Foundation”, 2nd Ed, Prentice-Hall,1999

L. Fausett, “Fundamentals of Neural Networks: Architectures, Algorithms, and Application s”, Prentice-Hall, 1994



Recommended Literature

None

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

14

14

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project




16

16

Seminar / Presentation




16

16

Total Workload

125

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5


Course Code: GBE 338

Course Name: IMMUNOLOGY AND IMMUNOGENETICS

Level: Undergraduate

Year: III

Semester: VI

ECTS Credits: 5

Status: Mandatory

Hours/Week: 2+2

Total Hours: 30+30

Course Description

This course provides a broad survey of modern immunology, covering such topics as molecular concepts of antigenic specificity, chemistry of antibodies and their interactions with antigens and cells, regulation of the immune response, transplantation, autoimmunity, and tumor immunology. The course is taken concurrently with a lab course, which is teaching students basic experimental concepts in immunology, such as differential blood picture, counting blood cells, HLA typing, and hemoglobin analysis.

Course Objectives

The cognitive, affective and behavioral objectives of this course are following:

  • Providing a theoretical and applied perspective of classical and modern immunology.

  • Teaching students basics of immunogenetics.

  • Explaining HLA typization.

  • Introducing basic Blood tests.

  • Providing basic concepts of allergy.

  • Explaining autoimmunity.

Course Contents

(weekly plan)



Week 1: Properties and overview of immune responses. Innate immunity

Week 2: Cells and tissues of immune system

Week 3: Antibodies and antigens. Major histocompatibility complex molecules

Week 4: Antigen processing and presentation to T lymphocytes. Antigen receptors and accessory molecules of T lymphocytes

Week 5: Lymphocyte development and antigen receptor gene rearrangement

Week 6: Activation of T lymphocytes

Week 7: B cell activation and antibody production

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9: Immunological tolerance. Cytokines

Week 10: Effector mechanisms of cell-mediated and humoral immunity

Week 11: Immunity to microbes

Week 12: Transplantation immunology

Week 13: Autoimmunity

Week 14: Immunity to tumors

Week 15: Hypersensitivity



Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK
LABORATORY CONTENTS

Week 1: Beginning of classes

Week 2, Lab 1: Introduction to lab course

Week 3, Lab 2: Blood smear

Week 4, Lab 3: Leukocyte count

Week 5, Lab 4: RBC count

Week 6, Lab 5: Determination of blood type, bleeding and clotting time

Week 7, Lab 6: Osmotic fragility



Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM WEEK

Week 9, Lab 7: Platelet count

Week 10 Lab 8: Separation of blood components

Week 11, Lab 9: Bacterial antigens

Week 12, Lab 10: Precipitation of blood proteins

Week 13, Lab 11: ELISA (virtual lab)



Week 14: Preparation for practical exam

Week 15: Practical exam from lab course

Week 16: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Teaching Methods

Description

  • Interactive lectures and communication with students

  • Discussions and group work

  • Presentations

  • Laboratory work

Assessment Methods Description (%)

Quiz

0 %

Lab/Practical Exam

20 %

Homework

0 %

Term Paper

0 %

Project

20 %

Attendance

0 %

Midterm Exam

20 %

Class Deliverables

0 %

Presentation

0 %

Final Exam

40 %

Total

100 %

Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Prepare and interpret blood smears

  2. Describe basic organs of the lymph system

  3. Perform ABO, MN, Rh blood typing

  4. Isolate blood proteins

  5. Interpret blood lab results

  6. Perform immunological detection of viruses and bacteria

Prerequisite Course(s)

(if any)


None

Language of Instruction

English

Mandatory Literature

Abbas, A. K., Lichtman, A. H. H., & Pillai, S. (2011). Cellular and molecular immunology, 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA, USA: Saunders

Recommended Literature

Harvey R., Doan T., Melvold R., Viselli S., & Waltenbaugh, C. (2012). Immunology, 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA, USA: LWW

ECTS (ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT’S WORKLOAD)

Activities

Quantity

Duration

Workload

Lecture (15 weeks x Lecture hours per week)

15

2

30

Laboratory / Practice (15 weeks x Laboratory / Practice hours per week)

15

2

30

Midterm Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Final Examination (1 week)

1

2

2

Preparation for Midterm Examination

1

14

14

Preparation for Final Examination

1

15

15

Assignment / Homework / Project




14

14

Seminar / Presentation




18

18

Total Workload

125

ECTS Credit (Total Workload / 25)

5
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